07/10/1950 Schwinn World – 21” Frame – SA 3 Speed – Black

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rennfaron

Wore out three sets of tires already!
As stated in a previous post, I almost never see the World models pop up. I was able to buy the bike from a fellow CABE’er and am fortunate to be the next caretaker of this bike. You don’t really come across them like this: all original, first year production example, hard to find model and in top notch condition. Although the World Travelers were more expensive they tend to pop up a lot more than these Worlds do and I consider them more uncommon.

The World model started in 1950 along with its more expensive, big brother the World Traveler. The World was the base model of all the lightweights at the time, but still a killer bike. The World model was discontinued at the end of 1953 and started back up again in 1955 for a short period and was again discontinued, and this time for good (as far as the 1950s style bikes go).

Overview:
  • The paint is a very deep opaque black with outstanding pin striping and color blocking. I really like the stainless steel fenders that went on the World Travelers, but the color blocking and striping on the fenders is very nice. The striping on the fork dart always gets me because you almost never see them strip down to the drop outs on the lightweights of this time (it is pretty unique). Also noting that all the lightweights during the 50s received the front peak fender style.
  • The World got the same style decals as the World Traveler at the time. These style graphics are and obvious iteration of the 40s Continental decal package. For whatever reason the early Worlds did not get a chain guard decal and it was left clean, similar to how the higher end lightweight guards were treated: without decal. Look at the decal condition overall!
  • As noted in other places, the early (1950-51) World Traveler and World models got the same New World head badge used on the New Worlds during the 40s. As the New World ended in 1949/1950 it transitioned to the World Traveler and World models as the mid to lower end light line.
  • The stem is a razor stem and only found on these early models and was quickly phased out by 1952. The bars are the same swept back gull wing touring bars found on all tourist setup lightweights during the early to mid 1950s. The grips are the typical oval script design found on the mid to lower end lightweights of the 50s (note the earlier oval design have the groove lines wrap around the ends, the later design stopped at the ends. A subtle change over the years). Calipers are the ones you find on this ear of lightweight and are a carry over of the type used on the 40s lightweights. These were phased out pretty quick for a new style starting in about 1951/52. Look at those original cloth wrapped cable housings…they held up over the years!
  • This shifter/hub setup is a 3 speed Sturmey Archer found on all the upper end models of the era. You almost never ever, ever see the red paint infill still intact on these. I forgot to get a shot of the hubs and will update.
  • The saddle is a Brooks mattress saddle used at the time and on the early World Travelers you saw them use a bunch of English saddles before they really switched over to badging everything Schwinn. The brands I see pop up the most are Brooks and Wrights. I like that stamp on the side that stays Brooks—I don’t think I have seen that before. The seat post is the Schwinn script you see often in the 50s and the seat clamp is the same used on all these during the early to mid 50s (I think they call that the D style clamp). Calipers have the Schwinn script and are also a style that carried over from the 40s style found on lightweights. Pads are gone but I think I have some originals around here.
  • Crank is a one piece and chain ring is the clover style, both from this era.
  • Wheels are the tubular S-6 setup found on the lightweights of the 50s. It has the knurling down the centerline and this has the very early knurling pattern that was eventually phased out for another pattern style. Tires are Schwinn Straight Side Sports Touring and are original. You find these across the board on the Schwinn lightweights of the time.
  • Lastly, the pedals are the Schwinn Approved type before the large caps became the norm.
  • Serial – G185000
I am pretty excited about this bike and thank the previous owner for allowing me to take care of it for many years to come. Enjoy!

Other bikes I have posted:

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49autocycledeluxe

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
they don't come much nicer than that one. my 1950 Traveler has a Schwinn Tag on the seat and no Brooks embossing as well as a different seat frame.... the cover itself is slightly different as well. I wonder if mine was swapped out, there are no hooks for the seat bag.

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49autocycledeluxe

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
... I actually prefer the painted fenders. I am going to put one together using the extra parts from a 1950 Girls bike I have using a later mens frame. if I get to the paint part of it, it will be black or maroon with the scallops on the fenders.
 

rennfaron

Wore out three sets of tires already!
I like the painted and SS fenders, but sometimes the painted ones just hit a little harder than the SS ones. But then sometimes I see the SS ones and all the shiny metal looks great. Just depends on the day.

Your saddle is correct. I wasn't saying that you only see Brooks or Wrights but they seem to turn up more in the early models. Schwinn had their own touring saddles they used during the time too. That is an early Schwinn badged saddle and my 1951 World Traveler has another Schwinn badged iteration/variant of that one. Those seemed to come on the early World Travelers before they switched over to the more triangular shaped mattress saddle.
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Here is another 1950 World Traveler that has the same saddle you have.
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Oilit

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Wow! The number of bikes from 1950 that have survived original and untouched in that kind of condition has to be a small and select group. Congratulations on another great find!
 

rennfaron

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Wow! The number of bikes from 1950 that have survived original and untouched in that kind of condition has to be a small and select group. Congratulations on another great find!
More to come...
I agree, any nice condition lightweight from the early to mid 50s is hard to come by. I luckily have come by a few of them.
Big thanks to the previous owner for saving it and keeping it well all these years!
 

49autocycledeluxe

Cruisin' on my Bluebird

this one has been on the Bay Area Craigslist for a while now. I'd say the vintage lightweight crowd is pretty small. I think it was discussed here. that seat would have to go, it looks like a rotten banana.

1417408
 

rennfaron

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Maybe the lightweight community is small...and smart... I would hope they saw that all the frame decals have been newly applied on top of the old decals...That thing got Bicycle Bone'd... Good parts though...or a frame swap.
 

SirMike1983

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
The painted fenders are more interesting than the stainless ones. The situation over the years has reversed itself - at that time, the stainless were something a little more exotic and offered rust resistance. Today we're used to seeing stainless, chrome, or aluminum fenders on bikes, so the silver metal seems kind of common today and it's the hand-detailed and striped fenders that seem different.

The dart series painted fenders are a nice touch and show a little more youth-oriented compared to the more conservative box pinstriping of the 1940s New World. I like how the darts draw on Schwinn's history with balloon tire bikes in the colors and style. It's very much a "flashy" bike with the large transfers on the frame and the striking paint scheme. The mechanical side is conventional, which is probably a good thing in terms of reliability and replacement parts.

The main drawbacks are the difficulty finding the 23 inch frame if you prefer that size, and the under-sized seat post for those who want to use a modern Brooks as a workhorse for riding around. The original mattes saddles from that era are nice display items for an original bike, but I have never been impressed with how they ride today.
 
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