1890's 'Huseby' Timber & Iron Frame Survivor

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Jesse McCauley

McCauley Cycle Works
I have been slowly trying to rebuild this machine for the past few years after finding it as a frame / fork some time ago.
I had a suspicion this could be a Huseby machine but with insight from Jeff Kidder and Matt Stofko that ID seems to be confirmed.

I'm not sure if the badge would have once had an insert or if the framed 'H' image is all there would have been.

Traces of the original paint scheme are visible throughout- green and red pigment together in a way that I have a hard time envisioning what it looked like new.
Gold filigree still holding on visible on the seat tube especially.

Construction akin to tool handles and parlor chairs, it is remarkable to me that this bicycle survived the rigors of 19th century roads and riding.

I would love to find an advert that shows this ladies model, iron frame section that makes up the bottom bracket housing is so strange, I can't for the life of me understand that extended portion of the top tube...unless the top tube itself runs all the way through to the end of that iron housing for structural integrity? Maybe?

Anyway, I love this bike and I hope you do too

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1896 Huseby wooden shell hubs.jpg
 

gkeep

I live for the CABE
The advertisement mentions aluminum or aluminum bronze fittings, are these cast or drop forged steel?

Is that a wedge in the top of the fork like a wedge in an axe handle? It seems like they designed the bike with a remarkable combination of technology from the time used to build farm machinery, wagons, tools , etc. That extra length at the bottom of the top tube must have been to strengthen that like a longer socket for a shovel handle. Maybe all those sockets are fox wedged joints in place of any bolt or screw that would require drilling through the wood and weaken it?

Incredible survivor as you said. I wonder if somewhere there is a small local historical society museum with one of thee sitting in storage or on display.
 
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