1899 Columbia chainless Mod. 59

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jpromo

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Bars and fork installed. Crank fully greased and reassembled. Spins smooth as silk.
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The Admiral

Finally riding a big boys bike
Thanks! Judging by the spinning direction and logic, standard would have been my guess. The issue with removing from the back is that you still won't be able to fully disassemble it as the driveshaft can slide out the back, but not out the front. Without a rear wheel on, I could not hold the rear bevel gear tight enough to get the front nut off. I maybe could have adjusted the lash cones in to free up that nut, but I opted to give a clean and grease as best I could in one piece. Good to know for the future if I ever restore the bike.

If you put a socket wrench on that rear nut, it’ll spin the whole driveshaft and loosen the square nut in front. Then the driveshaft will slide out the rear. But if it spins well, no need to mess with it. I only took it out on mine because it was caked with old, gritty grease and wouldn’t spin well at all. Good luck with the rest of your project!


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jpromo

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
If you put a socket wrench on that rear nut, it’ll spin the whole driveshaft and loosen the square nut in front. Then the driveshaft will slide out the rear. But if it spins well, no need to mess with it. I only took it out on mine because it was caked with old, gritty grease and wouldn’t spin well at all. Good luck with the rest of your project!


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Ahhhh, yes, it seems so obvious now! Thank you.
 

jpromo

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Unfortunately found one specialty piece missing--the expander to lock the seat post.

1252327

Hey, I know where I can find a wedge piece that should work.

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From some Musselman guts I had laying around. Oh shoot, but the piece also needs to perfectly match the seatpost radius.

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Heh, sometimes you get lucky. But now it needs some modifications to sit inside its new home.

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I swear I'm not drinking in the shop. Function over fashion.

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Had to thin it down just a hair.

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Voila.
 

Velocipedist Co.

I live for the CABE
Unfortunately found one specialty piece missing--the expander to lock the seat post.

View attachment 1252327

Hey, I know where I can find a wedge piece that should work.

View attachment 1252328

From some Musselman guts I had laying around. Oh shoot, but the piece also needs to perfectly match the seatpost radius.

View attachment 1252332

Heh, sometimes you get lucky. But now it needs some modifications to sit inside its new home.

View attachment 1252333

I swear I'm not drinking in the shop. Function over fashion.

View attachment 1252334

Had to thin it down just a hair.

View attachment 1252335

Voila.

Excellent work!
 

jpromo

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
I posted in the wanted listings, but I will mention here that I am looking for a solid, usable, 28 hole 28" wood hoop. The 36h rear was good but of course the uncommon 28h front was blown up.

I will be getting some Deans for this and the end goal is a rider. I may still end up getting Stutzman hoops, but budget is finite right now.
 

jpromo

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Alright, after a bit of hem-hawing, trying to find an original 28h hoop, and ultimately ordering some from Stutzman, we're back to working on the chainless.

Stutzman aluminum lined 700c. Beautiful as always. Now to make them look old.

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Yes, yes. Now this gave me the perfect opportunity to use one of my favorite wood finishing techniques.

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Black Tea and ironized vinegar courtesy of steel wool and other assorted nuts and bolts laying around left to sit for a day or so. Brush on tea, followed up with a brush of the vinegar solution. It doesn't doesn't look like anything is happening for maybe an hour. Don't fret. The idea is that the tea absorbs into the wood, then the vinegar solution reacts with the tannic acid giving the wood an aged look. Buckle up. Two passes of this and you have a lovely, weathered gray, hundred year old hoop (set against my 100 year old wood floors).

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Two coats of tung oil, which I prefer for antique finishes as it protects, but retains a natural, wood-like appearance instead of a glazed look more apt for a restored bike.

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