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1920s Umberto Dei stayer

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labile

Look Ma, No Hands!
Just want to share with you the oldest bike I have.
1923-24 Umberto Dei stayer frameset + crankset, the oldest U.Dei stayer I've ever seen.
Still looking for the right components to properly finish it!

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congratulations on this wonderful find

expect you are enjoying lots of good fun researching it and questing for appropriate bits

chainwheel pattern makes suspect chainset a Way-Assauto product

dentition quite small for a stayer; this may have been used for training...

wonder if lug pattern may be something from Malaguti

would expect the integral headset to have u-races and employ 1/8" ball

wonder if shell width could be seventy-four

do you envision applying transfers?


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I’ve bought this frameset in 2018 and it’s still the same as it was back then, so I’d add a bit of frustation to the fun. Honestly, the “easier” way to properly complete the bike would be to find a donor bike of the same era (or from 1930s) and move the components to this frame.

It was originally sold to me as a late 1930s bike, but a bit of research had the main result to bring the production year back to 1923-24.

You’re right about gearing, although I’ve found some pics of 1920s-30s stayer bikes in action that show small chainring setup (I’ve been told by a former stayer rider that for really small velodromes they used a significantly smaller chainring than standard).

Also, I’ve found many cases in which stayer frameset were just plain painted without any transfer applied. I’ve been told this might be a resprayed frameset, but the paint used is very old and I’ll stick with the current configuration.

Regarding the headset, I’ve not checked it. 1/8” were used for Bianchi semi integrated headset, likewise wouldn’t sound strange if U.Dei used the same ball bearings diameter.
 
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the recently concluded Mostra Scambio Novegro event in Milano would have been an excellent place to search for appropriate fittings

or perchance you were able to attend...

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I've been to Novegro swap market many times, but even that is not the right place to find what I'm looking for.
Seems to be strange, but for me it has always been easier to find difficult components on the web rather than locally.
 
Nice bike...I do love those stayers. Ive built up a few stayer frames and alot of old track frames. The beauty of these are alot fewer parts and pieces. The roadbikes need so much more...see my masi mess post. On the stayers the right wheelset can be tough to find and then theirs matching the patina of your parts to an original bike. Keep us posted
 
I'm curious about the fork end axle cutouts. The short 650mm wheel fork legs would be much too stiff to spread, and I do not see the advantage to the large "keyhole" axle cutout shape. I'm wondering if they might have used a "cone shaped" washer under the axle nut for a positive axle retention.

That cone shaped "safety washer" combined with a keyhole cut fork end was adopted by Schwinn in the 1970's to help comply with the then new CPSC axle retention regulations. In this world nothing is ever actually new, it's just old ideas that find new applications.

John
 
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keyhole fork ends -

when one gets far eno' back in time there were hubs produced whose axle locknuts had a raised curcular shape on their face which corresponded with the axle opening on the frame's fork ends


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keyhole fork ends -

when one gets far eno' back in time there were hubs produced whose axle locknuts had a raised curcular shape on their face which corresponded with the axle opening on the frame's fork ends


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That makes perfect sense, a very simple solution to the wheel retention.

Thanks, John
 
Nice bike...I do love those stayers. Ive built up a few stayer frames and alot of old track frames. The beauty of these are alot fewer parts and pieces. The roadbikes need so much more...see my masi mess post. On the stayers the right wheelset can be tough to find and then theirs matching the patina of your parts to an original bike. Keep us posted
yes, road bikes needs many more components but 99% of the times those are much easier to find (especially talking about 70yo bikes or younger). I agree about the wheelset, but I've noticed finding the right stem or saddle is the biggest challenge
 
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