1950s Schwinn New World

Most Recent BUY IT NOW Items Listed on eBay
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture

Elijah.rain

On Training Wheels
Hey!

I found this at a local thrift store and I'm trying to find out more information about it, including what it might be worth. I'm primarily interested in flipping it, so I'm hoping you all can help me understand what it might be worth and where would be best to sell it.

So far, I've learned that it's a New World Schwinn model produced in either 1952 or 1957 (according to bikehistory.org's serial search tool, although I was told on another forum the bike may be older). The serial number I found on the frame beneath the pedals is: D19494

It's a three speed and everything appears to still function as it should.

I have additional photos of the bike, but can only seem to upload one. Additional photos of the bike can be viewed on a Google drive folder here: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=1SKoyB6Yxmd4HfWRx3YzrsD1l64b04mHy

What do you all think?

IMG_20200812_172537.jpg
 

GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Your link to more pics doesn't work and that serial lookup is wrong again. Your New World is either a 1948 model or possibly a late 1947 issue. I can't help you out with a value, sorry.
 

Miq

I live for the CABE
I agree with @GTs58 on 47-48 dating. The pedals, and seat don't look original and it's missing the mudguards. It's got some nicer features like the 3 piece crank and multi-speed rear hub. With that said, it's not going to bring in a lot of money.
 

Oilit

I live for the CABE
So I wound up buying this bike, and there's a few details that the o.p. didn't notice but CABE members might find interesting. The original dealer looks to have been John's Bicycles of Pasadena, the Sturmey-Archer hub has no date and doesn't even have the "Three-Speed" stamp like most of the post war AW's, there's another set of stainless S-6 rims, and there's an interesting stamp on the bottom bracket above the serial. I read it as "L.A. CO G" which I'm guessing is Los Angeles County, but what's the "G" for?
In any case, my buddy doesn't seem too impressed.

IMG_3222.JPG


IMG_3223.JPG


IMG_3228.JPG


IMG_3236.JPG


IMG_3243.JPG
 
Last edited:

SirMike1983

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
1947 sounds right to me. Looks like a WWII era no-date hub. The stainless rims are a nice upgrade. Schwinn took quite awhile to move away from the old-style shifter. The 1946 and 47 bikes I've owned had the quadrant shifter like that one. A 1948-49 New World had the upside-down style shifter with solid faceplate. By 1948 the quadrant was "long in the tooth" technology. It's funny that the quadrant shifters are so desirable now, because, at that time, the upside down handlebar "click" shifter was considered to be an excellent upgrade. I think you have a good project there.
 

GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Congrats on the new New World @Oilit ! ...... I've been trying to find an early 47 year stamped SA hub and the earliest one I remember seeing was a 47 - 7. SirMike might be the owner of that one now and I think that one I came across when it was picked up by Matt aka mbstude. Here's one that was also on a Continental. Matt had another Continental with a serial real close to your NW and some info is posted below. It would be interesting to know how many weeks/months it was from the time the raw hub shells were stamped to the time Schwinn had them on the assembly line. I'd take an educated guess and say it was to 6-8 weeks.


1599971792089.png



1599971481474.png
 

Oilit

I live for the CABE
Congrats on the new New World @Oilit ! ...... I've been trying to find an early 47 year stamped SA hub and the earliest one I remember seeing was a 47 - 7. SirMike might be the owner of that one now and I think that one I came across when it was picked up by Matt aka mbstude. Here's one that was also on a Continental. Matt had another Continental with a serial real close to your NW and some info is posted below. It would be interesting to know how many weeks/months it was from the time the raw hub shells were stamped to the time Schwinn had them on the assembly line. I'd take an educated guess and say it was to 6-8 weeks.


View attachment 1265538


View attachment 1265537
Thank you!
Interesting that hub you posted still doesn't have the "Three-Speed" stamp, when the 1949 that @Gavin posted does. I've wondered about the dates on the hubs too. 6 to 8 weeks sounds reasonable, I get the impression the hubs were pretty high value and they didn't leave them around to collect dust. Gavin's bike:
 

Oilit

I live for the CABE
According to this postcard, John's Bicycles was established in 1909. Pasadena was probably a lot smaller back then!
 

GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Just hit me in the head after looking at your posting above. Pasadena was in LA County so the G in your stamping is most likely a town designation. There are three G towns in LA County.


GardenaSeptember 11, 1930
58,829​
GlendaleFebruary 15, 1906
203,054​
GlendoraNovember 13, 1911
50,073​
 

SirMike1983

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
I also have no firm idea on when date stamping resumed on the WWII era hubs. The no-date hubs I've seen appeared on bikes from immediately before the war and with a couple years after. The blue Continental had a 47 date code, if I recall correctly. I sold it back to Matt when I moved back to New England.

At one time I thought it might be export-related because the 36 hole hubs were mainly for export (the English used 40 hole for the most part). But then I came across a couple no-date hubs with 40 holes drilled (I have one on a pre-war Phillips roadster), so that went out as well.

I've seen some 1950s era hubs with no date codes, but they had silver cones and splined drivers, so these are kind of a separate issue than the WWII era ones with threaded drivers.

The one place I have not really checked is Tony Hadland's new Hub of the Universe book about Sturmey. Maybe there's an explanation in there, I just haven't had a chance to read though it yet.
 

Oilit

I live for the CABE
Just hit me in the head after looking at your posting above. Pasadena was in LA County so the G in your stamping is most likely a town designation. There are three G towns in LA County.


GardenaSeptember 11, 1930
58,829​
GlendaleFebruary 15, 1906
203,054​
GlendoraNovember 13, 1911
50,073​
That makes sense. According to Wikipedia, L.A. county has a greater land area than Delaware and Rhode Island combined, and a larger population than 41 of the 50 states, so if this was some kind of registration system, they needed a way to narrow it down!
 

Oilit

I live for the CABE
Congrats on the new New World @Oilit ! ...... I've been trying to find an early 47 year stamped SA hub and the earliest one I remember seeing was a 47 - 7. SirMike might be the owner of that one now and I think that one I came across when it was picked up by Matt aka mbstude. Here's one that was also on a Continental. Matt had another Continental with a serial real close to your NW and some info is posted below. It would be interesting to know how many weeks/months it was from the time the raw hub shells were stamped to the time Schwinn had them on the assembly line. I'd take an educated guess and say it was to 6-8 weeks.


View attachment 1265538


View attachment 1265537
Your post sent me looking for Matt's other bike and it took some digging but I found it. You're right, the serial is real close, and going by the ad, the rear hub looks identical. Here are the links:
And the Continental he sold to @SirMike1983 and then bought back is a really nice example. I can see how that would cause second thoughts!
 
Last edited:

SirMike1983

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Your post sent me looking for Matt's other bike and it took some digging but I found it. Your right, the serial is real close, and going by the ad, the rear hub looks identical. Here are the links:
And the Continental he sold to @SirMike1983 and then bought back is a really nice example. I can see how that would cause second thoughts!

It was a nice bike. I kept the black New World and sold back the Continental because I just got more attached to the New World. The Continental was a nicer, lighter, faster bike. But I had just gotten attached to the New World for some reason. I took the proceeds and bought a 1951 Raleigh Clubman though. So I did not end up with that much more free space in the end.
 
Top