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1963 Bendix two speed hub rebuild

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ADReese

Wore out three sets of tires already!
I agree, I use light motor oil on the brake parts and a park grease on the bearings and moving parts.
 
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WillWork4Parts

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Yes, pack the bearings with grease to hopefully hold your oil in from just running out of the hub. Grease on the planetary gears makes the hub growl when the gears are engaged. Just oil on the planetary gears seems like it would run dry quicker, so I've been greasing the sides of the gears and shaft....and maybe a little gets in the ring gear too, but I coat all of that with gear oil. Coat all of the internals with gear oil and put a light coat of grease on the brake shoe ramps. Once everything I want greased is greased, I'll assemble one half of the hub and add more oil so that everything is rotating in an oil bath. Just don't fill it excessively to overflow past the bearings.
The NOS red band discs I've had came in the wax paper bag packed with grease. I'd be tempted on my next rebuild to use oil like in a New Departure for the discs too.
The main thing you want to avoid is putting grease on the internal parts too heavy and letting the hub sit to dry out. Grease on the index spring can cause it to stick to the driver and not do it's "ratcheting" job. Very light grease on the driver threads is ok, but once that cakes up, you get actuating issues.
 

spleeft

Finally riding a big boys bike
Ive rebuilt a few and used Phil Wood grease on everything but the brake shoes ( at first a little too much and it leaks out while riding , also was a little hard to turn so I simply partially disassembled and removed the excess ....kind of have to "trail and error" it ). And Pro Gold EPX Cycle grease on the brake shoes ( both Red and Yellow Band ) and actually kind of on the heavy side. The EPX seems to works great. I ride mine a lot also.
Here is my first rebuild thread of the 2-speed kickback, def used too much Phil wood but that amount on the brakes worked out well.
https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/f...-drug-i-think-this-will-be-fun.182807/page-12
 
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Huntingtonbikeguru

Look Ma, No Hands!
Ok gang. I got my courage up and jumped in. Got the Schwinn shop manual open to page 238 Figure 3 and I cannot get the adjusting cone gear to come loose. Now what?

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Huntingtonbikeguru

Look Ma, No Hands!
Cannot get the sprocket to move either direction and the adjusting cone is really tight. I can turn it counter clockwise about 1/8 rotation but then it seizes up.

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ADReese

Wore out three sets of tires already!
It's difficult to explain over text, but you turn the outer piece to the left as the cog goes to the right. They go at the same time. You have to do it by feel so they don't get bound together. The planetary gears inside are turning and disengaging slowly as the outer cone unththreads from the axle.
 
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