Are these Colson Disks Good or Bad?


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jchicago

Finally riding a big boys bike
Jul 28, 2017
113
193
Lake Zurich, IL, United States
#1
I've completely disassembled my Colson Snap Tank.

I'm wondering if these brake disks are still good, or should they be replaced?

Picture 1 is side one. Picture 2 is side two.

(Too hard to tell?)

Colson Discs.jpg


Colson Discs 2.jpg
 

fordmike65

Riding a '37 Colson Imperial
Mar 4, 2012
17,035
25,923
East Los
#4
Those aren't bad at all. I resurface them by hand with whatever roll of sandpaper is hanging in the parts Dept. Usually 80-120 grit. Then finish them off with a Scotchbrite pad. Wash them off with brake clean and dry them with shop air. Fill a spray paint can cap with 30wt oil and let them soak.
 

Boris

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Feb 16, 2008
11,311
5,555
Portland, OR 97206
#6
They look good to me, but you may want to resurface them as mentioned above. If the edge of any tab catches on your fingertip, file it down smooth and you should be good to go after sloshing 'em down in some 30wt motor oil or something similar.
 

jchicago

Finally riding a big boys bike
Jul 28, 2017
113
193
Lake Zurich, IL, United States
#8
Those aren't bad at all. I resurface them by hand with whatever roll of sandpaper is hanging in the parts Dept. Usually 80-120 grit. Then finish them off with a Scotchbrite pad. Wash them off with brake clean and dry them with shop air. Fill a spray paint can cap with 30wt oil and let them soak.
I'm on it.

Disk Supplies.JPG
 
Likes: Miyata FL.

TR6SC

I live for the CABE
Jun 12, 2016
1,006
2,628
66
Eureka, CA
#9
After you're done the stack should measure 0.750". This is the thickness when new.
The shorter the stack, the more kickback required to engage the brakes. Also, due to wear of the clutch sleeve and inner surface of the hub, you make have too much kickback for your liking. More discs can be put in to shorten the play.
 

Boris

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Feb 16, 2008
11,311
5,555
Portland, OR 97206
#10
After you're done the stack should measure 0.750". This is the thickness when new.
The shorter the stack, the more kickback required to engage the brakes. Also, due to wear of the clutch sleeve and inner surface of the hub, you make have too much kickback for your liking. More discs can be put in to shorten the play.
Like, like, like, like, like!
 

Autocycleplane

I live for the CABE
Jan 6, 2010
1,624
3,921
NorCal, United States
#11
After you're done the stack should measure 0.750". This is the thickness when new.
The shorter the stack, the more kickback required to engage the brakes. Also, due to wear of the clutch sleeve and inner surface of the hub, you make have too much kickback for your liking. More discs can be put in to shorten the play.
There isn't much about these hubs I like, but that is one nice little trick I learned about them long ago. When a Morrow has too much kickback, unfortunately you gotta replace a bunch of parts to fix it. Nice tip, way to share. :cool:
 

fordmike65

Riding a '37 Colson Imperial
Mar 4, 2012
17,035
25,923
East Los
#12
After you're done the stack should measure 0.750". This is the thickness when new.
The shorter the stack, the more kickback required to engage the brakes. Also, due to wear of the clutch sleeve and inner surface of the hub, you make have too much kickback for your liking. More discs can be put in to shorten the play.
One day Scott(rustjunkie) and I were rebuilding the rear hub on my HTB Monark when he suggested adding a disc to lessen the kickback issue I mentioned. Worked like a charm.
 

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