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Bike Storage Question

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ian

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Yes, from two hooks, and two straps, the bikes hang more or less parallel to the floor. The strap at the seatpost takes most of the load. The other strap will engage the handlebar or the top tube, whatever works best. There's no tying and untying of knots. Grab a loop, stick it through the frame and hang the resulting two ends over the hooks. Unfasten the outer ends to release the bike. It helps that I'm tall enough to easily reach the ceiling, and strong enough to lift my bikes with one hand. I wouldn't suggest trying this method if one needed a step stool to access the hooks.

I use a similar method, with loops for storing bundles of tires. I salvaged a bunch of soft strapping, nylon and polyester, like this stuff. https://www.uline.com/Product/Detai...er-Cord-Strapping-in-Dispenser-Box-3-8-x-1125 . It's soft and supple, not the stiff plastic strapping that gets heat sealed around packages.

Sorry no pictures of this setup are available.

If one didn't want to scar up their ceiling as much, one could fasten hooks into 2x4s, then screw the 2x4 to the ceiling joists. 3 or 4, 3" long deck screws will hold a lot of weight and leave minimal holes in the ceiling. Be sure to hit the joists with screws, or one could end up with a real mess. Because of the limited thread engagement, if doing this with a 2x4, I might prefer to use machine screw threaded hooks, https://www.zoro.com/zoro-select-hook-bolts-steel-6-lx3-14-hx34-in-w-1rce2/i/G0906017/, rather than lag bolt type.

I've also contrived situations where I didn't want to pierce the ceiling at all, and hung heavy loads from a beam that was wedged up against the ceiling by screw jack poles. The load is carried by the posts. Pressing up against the ceiling gives a lot of lateral stability, so the rig doesn't topple sideways. For lighter loads, one can use studs that are a fraction of an inch longer than the distance from floor to ceiling minus the beam thickness, and hammer them into place, pressing the beam against the ceiling.
Thanks. My basement ceiling is pretty low, but hanging the rides by straps horizontally might give me room below for bins to store small parts.
 

Axman88

'Lil Knee Scuffer
Using loop straps, vs trying to hang bikes directly on hooks, makes a world of difference in ease of handling, in my opinion. Rather than trying to direct a remote part of the bike, like the front wheel, which is rotating all the while in two axes while you are trying to orient it onto a hook, one has the ends of the strap in hand, and hangs them directly onto the hook, and the bike comes along for the ride.

I've also found that I can hook up one end of the strap to the hook, then lift the bike by the second loop end, which reduces the weight I need to manipulate in half, the other half of the load being already on the hook.
 

ian

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Using loop straps, vs trying to hang bikes directly on hooks, makes a world of difference in ease of handling, in my opinion. Rather than trying to direct a remote part of the bike, like the front wheel, which is rotating all the while in two axes while you are trying to orient it onto a hook, one has the ends of the strap in hand, and hangs them directly onto the hook, and the bike comes along for the ride.

I've also found that I can hook up one end of the strap to the hook, then lift the bike by the second loop end, which reduces the weight I need to manipulate in half, the other half of the load being already on the hook.
I know the drill of multi-axis movement trying to place a front or rear rim over a hook in the ceiling. And it sure seems these bikes are kinda heavy too. I may try using parachute cord for straps.
Thanks, Ian
 

Vdubber

Look Ma, No Hands!
I thought about doing this in my newly built storage shed..

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