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Black Phantom- 1955?- Fair condition- What is it worth?

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furyus

Finally riding a big boys bike
No one asked but I’ll chime in. If I scored a bike in that condition I’d preserve it rather that ”clean it up” or restore it. Wash the dirt off of it, get it mechanically sound and arrest the rust with some light oil. Just arrest it, not remove it. I love survivors; they have a story. That story is lost with over-cleaning or restoring.
 

Nashman

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
No one asked but I’ll chime in. If I scored a bike in that condition I’d preserve it rather that ”clean it up” or restore it. Wash the dirt off of it, get it mechanically sound and arrest the rust with some light oil. Just arrest it, not remove it. I love survivors; they have a story. That story is lost with over-cleaning or restoring.
Hi, I get that opinion, respect it, and it seems over the last decade or so "patina" has become a more appreciated state of a vintage anything. That's good. It's true with many things that if you alter original wear or aging, you are in fact reducing the value and charm of said item. For that matter, "barn find and patina" are the buzz words of the decade. Over used in my opinion as lots of the terms are used inaccurate. A barn is a barn, and patina is from use or shelf/storage age. Not a shed or dumping salt on a repro sign. People have been watching the barns in AP too much.

I grimace at over-restored anything, but it happens and I've been guilty over the years, usually not on purpose. The quality of paint and plating sometimes surpasses the original finish. It happens. It's uncommon to tell a painter to be a bit sloppy or a plater, pin striper to cut a few steps or close one eye on your project. "Drink a 12 of bud before you spray paint my car, or do it Monday morning or just before you quit on Friday?" Hmnn.........

If something has been neglected and deteriorated based on being stored in poor unnatural conditions ( outside/damp/wet basement/ salt or chemicals) and the item can be "brought back" with a little detailing, personally I support that. It is a matter of choice and taste though. That bike looks like it has been neglected, not abused. There is a big difference. If that bike was owned and maintained and stored properly all these years, it would probably shine like new still. Take Bobby U's example he just sold on the Cabe. Survivors are wonderful. It's the state they have survived and how is the question. Lots of us "old school" guys are used to cleaning up the "patina" with some good old "elbow grease". To each their own. Personally, I'd buff the bike from stem to stern and bring back the natural beauty.

 

phantom

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Hi, I get that opinion, respect it, and it seems over the last decade or so "patina" has become a more appreciated state of a vintage anything. That's good. It's true with many things that if you alter original wear or aging, you are in fact reducing the value and charm of said item. For that matter, "barn find and patina" are the buzz words of the decade. Over used in my opinion as lots of the terms are used inaccurate. A barn is a barn, and patina is from use or shelf/storage age. Not a shed or dumping salt on a repro sign. People have been watching the barns in AP too much.

I grimace at over-restored anything, but it happens and I've been guilty over the years, usually not on purpose. The quality of paint and plating sometimes surpasses the original finish. It happens. It's uncommon to tell a painter to be a bit sloppy or a plater, pin striper to cut a few steps or close one eye on your project. "Drink a 12 of bud before you spray paint my car, or do it Monday morning or just before you quit on Friday?" Hmnn.........

If something has been neglected and deteriorated based on being stored in poor unnatural conditions ( outside/damp/wet basement/ salt or chemicals) and the item can be "brought back" with a little detailing, personally I support that. It is a matter of choice and taste though. That bike looks like it has been neglected, not abused. There is a big difference. If that bike was owned and maintained and stored properly all these years, it would probably shine like new still. Take Bobby U's example he just sold on the Cabe. Survivors are wonderful. It's the state they have survived and how is the question. Lots of us "old school" guys are used to cleaning up the "patina" with some good old "elbow grease". To each their own. Personally, I'd buff the bike from stem to stern and bring back the natural beauty.

I get what you are saying. I appreciate aged patina and originality. What I don't get is pictures of a bike with mud, dirt a little surface rust and it's been that way in their possession for months or years in that condition. Bikes can be original and clean at the same time. Removing dirt and grime is not hurting originality.
 
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