Bottom bracket noise.

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ian

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Doesn't look sharktoothed to me.
I didn't think so either, but I thought I'd ask anyway. There are untold amounts of experience on here that I refer to often, and someone on here prolly has an answer.
Thanks for the help.
Ian
 

ian

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Ouch ooo, yikes~ while probably unrelated, get U some lock, biting washers on the axel nuts! Those drop-outs can be a real pain and worse without proper washers. 😉
The dropouts are spread a bit, and when I use washers, the chain gets too tight. The washers contact where the axle adjusters are and pushes the axle/rim back. Does this make sense ?
 

Archie Sturmer

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Sometimes, I use 5/16” USS standard flat washers (versus SAE), that have a reduced OD (compared to 3/8”), and usually fit 3/8” axles.
 
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Jeff54

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
The dropouts are spread a bit, and when I use washers, the chain gets too tight. The washers contact where the axle adjusters are and pushes the axle/rim back. Does this make sense ?
When I was a kid, just big enough to ride a 26" bike with wood blocks on the pedals, my dad brought 3 bikes home from the junk yard or something -junk bikes. 2 were probably CWC and 1 was a Schwinn. I learned then and why I favored the Schwinn. On the CWC drop-outs, they were thinner and softer steel. ya gotta set the axel adjusters just right and without a thick and hard washer; As you squeeze it tight the nut can bend in the washer, spread the drop-out and push the axel out of adjustment. I can't remember if I ever solved that where it didn't need constant adjusting. Yet cheap 50-60's Murry and huffy with forward drop outs would spread easy too. Had to hammer them back which caused the metal to become weaker. Schwinn lock washers are harder and thick so, usually will not become depressed and spread the drop-out again. They can bite the steel and help. As I have not played with this problem in many, many years , others may know a better solution but for me these worked:

.
s-l400.jpg
 

ian

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
When I was a kid, just big enough to ride a 26" bike with wood blocks on the pedals, my dad brought 3 bikes home from the junk yard or something -junk bikes. 2 were probably CWC and 1 was a Schwinn. I learned then and why I favored the Schwinn. On the CWC drop-outs, they were thinner and softer steel. ya gotta set the axel adjusters just right and without a thick and hard washer; As you squeeze it tight the nut can bend in the washer, spread the drop-out and push the axel out of adjustment. I can't remember if I ever solved that where it didn't need constant adjusting. Yet cheap 50-60's Murry and huffy with forward drop outs would spread easy too. Had to hammer them back which caused the metal to become weaker. Schwinn lock washers are harder and thick so, usually will not become depressed and spread the drop-out again. They can bite the steel and help. As I have not played with this problem in many, many years , others may know a better solution but for me these worked:

.View attachment 1657307
I have a pair of these in my stash. And yes, the dropouts have spread a bit, enough so the cone nuts fit inside. Heat and a big hammer is next!
 

lordscool

Finally riding a big boys bike
The pedals seem to spin freely without any noise, but I may trade them out and try that too. Good thing I have a big stash pile 😀
Change it to a 175mm 3 pc crankset with sealed bearings, nice conversion kits pretty reasonable. Way better, smoother and quieter than old ball bearings. you will be way happier. You can always put it back if you sell it. Also is you sprocket tight to the crank? That will also make bad creaking noises.
 
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