• Due to some recent accounts having their passwords hacked, we are requiring that everyone set a new password. On your next login, you'll be given the option to choose a new one. Please follow current password guidelines for secure passwords. Sorry for the trouble!

Ca. 1896 Crawford Racer from Butler

Most Recent BUY IT NOW Items Listed on eBay
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture

dnc1

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Really nice!
Are you going to do any work on that saddle?
I would love to see some details of the shape of the saddle pan if you do get it re-covered.
As Jesse said @Balloonoob, display is probably the best option for something so original.
However, there are people out there who'll swap the wheels and saddle for something more rideable, this gives you the best of both worlds. Me too @GiovanniLiCalsi!
 

Jesse McCauley

McCauley Cycle Works
I'm working on re-fitting a Columbia chainless right now that I put up for sale in my "static display" fashion and realized maybe I should have gone the other way with it.

Added a re-covered original saddle and a set of Harper tires and I'll be re-listing shortly for just that kind of rider.

I'm all for it and don't mean to be dismissive, I'm impressed by the number of miles modern riders put on their century old machines.

This one likely won't see the road again but I'm working on a Snell Special 30" wheel that with new Stutzman hoops I don't see why I shouldn't take it for a lap once things thaw here in Detroit.
 

FreedomMachinist

Finally riding a big boys bike
Hello Everybody.

I stumbeld on this post by random and the photos of the Crawford reminded me of "Lenox".
There are quite a few common features:

Rams Horn, Headset:
1.png


Fork Crown, Cups, Socket
2.png



Adjustable Handlebar Clamping (Toothing + Locknut)
3.png


T-Post, Upper Rear Fork Attachment /Seat Post Clamping
4.png




Chainwheel (5 Circle Pattern)
5.png





Chainwheel attachment to Crankarm
6.png






Open drop outs on chain stays and upper rear fork, chain spanners
7.png






BB-assembly with two piece cranks and special center screw mounting (an ingenious assembly I think)

8.png





Since Lenxo was indeed a factory (Callender, McAuslan & Troup Co, Providence, RI) I would say it is safe to say that Crawford only badged the bike.








In regards to the topic discussed prior "how to conserve", my opinion on this:

For one it always hurts to change anything on such an old bicycle - especially a "straight from the barn" condition is delicate - and even something as easy as cleaning may give me a headache then - once the patina is gone its gone- so slightly cleaning and no major mechanical work, like Jesse suggests, is certainly the best way to go in terms of conservation and keeping the original state.

But I also have to admit that I'm always very tempted to not only conserve, but to also ride the item - where both actions stand in opposition to each other: in order to ride a TOC, you usually have to alter it, unfortunately :(

No doubt about 100years+ tires are not be ridden - some goes for most (if not all) wood rims of that age - even if they are true and look stable, I would not want to risk it.

So for riding, repro-wood rims are a good way to go - but of course kind of expensive (Italian made Chercio Ghisallos are really great, but 500€ for a set is quite an investment, not to mention the costs for period correct hubs, since I would not disassemble the original wheelset - if the hubs have survived in the rims for such a long time (maybe even with tires on them), they should remain there. Only exception might be if the rims are so badly destroyed that you can not even use them for display purpose anymore, then I might spoke in the OG hubs, but I did not need to make this decision yet.

By swaping out wheels (and saddle) for riding you still preserve the fragile OG items and nothing is in danger of being destroyed/lost.

But, for the purists I admit: Once a collector changes an item, it is not original anymore.
 

New Mexico Brant

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Since Lenxo was indeed a factory (Callender, McAuslan & Troup Co, Providence, RI) I would say it is safe to say that Crawford only badged the bike.
Sorry, this is just plain wrong; you maybe should research Crawford a bit more. They had a huge manufacturing facility in Hagerstown, MD. One visit to Mel Short's place one will realize more Crawfords survive today than Lenox bicycles; you will also see a 19th century lithography print of the factory in Hagerstown, Maryland.

It seems more likely the opposite is true and Crawford built your Lenox. Callender, McAuslan & Troup Company was a large department store, not a manufacturing company, in Rhode Island.


Crawford manufactured bicycles from at least 1893 until the ABC buyout. Pope later used the factory to build automobiles (the Pope-Tribune).

 
Last edited:

FreedomMachinist

Finally riding a big boys bike
Hello Brant.

You are right, I should have researched this better, thanks for setting this correct.

My assumption was short handed... After purchasing the bike, I also aquired a Lenox-Catalog
1729175
1729176


and I guess I was fooled by the sales pitch - the description makes it sound as if they make the wheels themselves.
e.g.:

"...increased strenght and better appearance of the wheel induces us as manufactures of strictly first-class bicycles ...."

"... To meet demand for a low-proced wheel, we have built this year The Navarre Model E ..."
1729169


Also, between the pages there was a letter with "jobbing prices" - and I believe "jobbers" are shops which only badge a bike (since I'm not a native English speaker this assumption might be wrong as well...)

1729170


So after googleing Callender McAuslan (which I should have done much earlier) , I agree you are right:
McAuslan only put the name "Lenox" on it, but did not make the bike themselves.
 
Last edited:
Top