Called--Under Desk Bike-Japan, Umbrella in Europe and Kayak Folding bike in USA --One Squeeze Fold

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Goldenrod

I live for the CABE
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On display in New York.
The Bridgestone Picnica (Japanese: Burijisuton Pikunika line of collapsible bikes, some models featuring belt-drives, were introduced in the early 1980s and carried in the Bridgestone Cycle USA catalogs from 1985 through 1990.[1][2] It weighs 29 pounds, and belt-drive models use a tooth-belt drive like auto timing belts and Harley-Davidson drive belts, along with a novel two-part chainring that increases belt tension with increasing load. In April 1987, Popular Mechanics described Bridgestone's Beltrex system as follows: "Unlike the belt-drive motorcycles, which can slide the rear wheel back to keep the belt taut, the Beltrex uses a floating pulley that's cogged to the drive gear. Tension on the pedal cranks drives the floating pulley forward, taking up belt slack and preventing tooth slippage."[3] Pinch brake is in front but an effective strap-over-drum brake in the rear for an antique-caveman-old-school experience. Mine must be missing the fenders so my under-carriage delicates will get dirty or stoned.

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A limited number of Picnica folding bikes were imported to Europe. This 1990 belt-drive model in Germany features an extended seat post for high saluting in parades?
The Picnica is a folding bicycle, and part of the appeal of the belt drive is cleanliness. It is a small wheel bicycle, so belt tension may be less than on a bicycle with standard-size wheels.

The folding mechanism is extremely simple, which accounts for the fact that the Picnica was marketed as the "One-touch Picnica" (You squeeze it, you Doooncuffs). We TOUCH only our designated ladies or the MEs and the TOOs will drag us behind our bikes. In a review, the Picnica folding mechanism was described as a "case of the frame collapsing backwards on itself, with the handlebars and seat post falling to the top of the rear wheel. To this end, the main part of the frame is a quadrilateral with a pivot at each corner, and a rear triangle made collapsible by hinged seat stays. It's those seat stays that hold everything in place. In the riding position they're straight and rigid, as on any bike. The upper part of each seat stay is locked in a retaining channel by spring pressure; squeeze the upper seat stays inwards and they pop out of their channels, and the hinge 'unlocks'. The upper and lower seat stays then fold over as the main frame folds – the whole bike collapses under its own weight."[4] After the owner folded it, I slid helplessly into ownership and it has become my favorite bike.

The Picnica was apparently commercially successful, but was offered mainly in Japan, where it sold for around 35 000 Japanese yen. The belt-drive version retailed for 45 000 yen.[5] About $350 in the USA. Only one has been sold on Ebay up to today's date? Any others in CABEland?
These were popular vehicles for looking for parts at car shows but avoid craters. It has no gearing because it is so light. The belt drive is a hoot. Notice that the dog poo bags are for when I ride with CABERs. Most of them are only semi-feral.

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ricobike

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Funny, I used to keep a Firestone Vagabond under my desk at the Amoco Building in Chicago when I worked for Amoco. Never thought to call it an "under-the-desk" bike. It was fun to take out on Navy Pier, people would ask me where they could rent one :).
 

Goldenrod

I live for the CABE
I have been on it each day and it takes so little effort that I am lowering my level of exercise. I am 170 lbs. and I am sure that it has a weight limit but where are more of these? Bridgestone tires stores didn't sell them?
 

Fritz Katzenjammer

Finally riding a big boys bike
Odd coincidence that this should be posted now, one of these little freaks showed up in our shop for a tune up and tires this week. The owner had brought it with her when she emigrated to Canada.

the next day an old bike with shaft drive showed up... it was truly odd bike week.
 

FICHT 150

Finally riding a big boys bike
Interesting little bike. I actually have two Raleigh 20s, and I am somewhat embarrassed to admit, I have never folded either bike. I just never had a good reason to. But, I think if you are going to call a bike a “Picnic Bike” it needs to have a picnic basket on it, and the blue 20 has one that Yogi bear would be proud to get into. Usually is full of beer and ice though.

Ted

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Goldenrod

I live for the CABE
Interesting little bike. I actually have two Raleigh 20s, and I am somewhat embarrassed to admit, I have never folded either bike. I just never had a good reason to. But, I think if you are going to call a bike a “Picnic Bike” it needs to have a picnic basket on it, and the blue 20 has one that Yogi bear would be proud to get into. Usually is full of beer and ice though.

Ted

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I don't have a twenty. I have an 18"-- slow, fat, mistake they made before the 20. The picnic or with an "a" at the end (Pikunika) means something else in Japanese. These are often in good shape, not ridden?
 

FICHT 150

Finally riding a big boys bike
I’ve never seen the little bike you posted about. But, along with the Raleigh SMW (small wheel bikes) they are sort of a novelty, and useful only in a narrow window of use. I think most buyers don’t realize that when they get one, and the bikes do t get used all that hard.
I’ve seen a few that were chained to something outdoors, and lived like that for decades, in all weather. They were junk, but, not from meaningful use.

Ted
 

66TigerCat

I live for the CABE
Interesting little bike. I actually have two Raleigh 20s, and I am somewhat embarrassed to admit, I have never folded either bike. I just never had a good reason to. But, I think if you are going to call a bike a “Picnic Bike” it needs to have a picnic basket on it, and the blue 20 has one that Yogi bear would be proud to get into. Usually is full of beer and ice though.

Ted

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Ah yes, the Raleigh Twenty. The only folding bike that gets bigger when folded :)
 
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