Cicli Vecchi, Roma, Italia

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Freqman1

Riding a '37 Dayton Super Streamline
It’s been a while since I’ve researched these but it looks like most bikes I’ve seen are ‘47-9. I believe the Paris Roubaix was introduced in about ‘49 and was used through about ‘51. As others mentioned this is surprising to me given there were easier to use shifters out by this time. It’s hard to beat the cool factor though!
 
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Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
It’s been a while since I’ve researched these but it looks like most bikes I’ve seen are ‘47-9. I believe the Paris Roubaix was introduced in about ‘49 and was used through about ‘51. As others mentioned this is surprising to me give their were easier to use shifters out by this time. It’s hard to beat the cool factor though!
I think a lot of it still had to do with companies sponsoring top teams and riders. Keeps your name/product in the public's eye. Considering frames had to be built for those designs; I doubt many builders would have spent the time and effort on something that they thought wouldn't be backed up with use by prominant teams.
 

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
@dnc1 , Here is an excerpt from my Italia Bicyclopedia with the Vecchi entry including your post properly credited and referenced, and surrounded by many other 'well known' Italian brands:
...
Vagner*
(fork crowns; 40s?-80s? *French company, but also utilized by Italian builders)
Vaira (builder?, from Pinerolo Torino; private bike shop selling own brand Italian bikes; Bianchi dealer of Lombardia region)
Valentino (need to research)
Valla (need to research)
Vallorani (need to research)
Valloreia (need to research)
Varsalona (need to research)
Vecchi, Cicli (shop brand?, possible Antonio Alpi built frame?; est. 1938?; address Via Ravenna-38 Roma) [mid-late 1940s? frame example with 2nd-3rd? gen. Cambio Corsa shifting system and internal cable routing on top tube, Libelulla tubing] ["a shop at Via Ravenna 38, Roma is still there in the same form as a small shop; but today it, and the adjacent unit, is an opticians. The optician's shop is owned and run by a Signor Fulvio Vecchi, and their website says that the family has been in operation from this building since 1938! I am guessing that he may be the son, grandson, or great grandson of this bike's originator." {October 2021; from dnc1; https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/cicli-vecchi-roma-italia.199049/unread}]
Vecchietti (need to research)
Vedovati Benedetti (need to research)
Vektor (Magliano Alpi)
Velital (by Olmo, Celle Ligure)
Veloetruria (need to research)
...

That is essentially what my current list looks like. Anything in bold is referenced. As you can see (and can't see); many many names without any info, so much work is left to do.
 

Freqman1

Riding a '37 Dayton Super Streamline
@dnc1 , Here is an excerpt from my Italia Bicyclopedia with the Vecchi entry including your post properly credited and referenced, and surrounded by many other 'well known' Italian brands:
...
Vagner*
(fork crowns; 40s?-80s? *French company, but also utilized by Italian builders)
Vaira (builder?, from Pinerolo Torino; private bike shop selling own brand Italian bikes; Bianchi dealer of Lombardia region)
Valentino (need to research)
Valla (need to research)
Vallorani (need to research)
Valloreia (need to research)
Varsalona (need to research)
Vecchi, Cicli (shop brand?, possible Antonio Alpi built frame?; est. 1938?; address Via Ravenna-38 Roma) [mid-late 1940s? frame example with 2nd-3rd? gen. Cambio Corsa shifting system and internal cable routing on top tube, Libelulla tubing] ["a shop at Via Ravenna 38, Roma is still there in the same form as a small shop; but today it, and the adjacent unit, is an opticians. The optician's shop is owned and run by a Signor Fulvio Vecchi, and their website says that the family has been in operation from this building since 1938! I am guessing that he may be the son, grandson, or great grandson of this bike's originator." {October 2021; from dnc1; https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/cicli-vecchi-roma-italia.199049/unread}]
Vecchietti (need to research)
Vedovati Benedetti (need to research)
Vektor (Magliano Alpi)
Velital (by Olmo, Celle Ligure)
Veloetruria (need to research)
...

That is essentially what my current list looks like. Anything in bold is referenced. As you can see (and can't see); many many names without any info, so much work is left to do.
Not to hi-Jack this thread but I mentioned in this thread I recently purchased a Nical Baldini with a Cambio Corsa but can find nothing on the company. The seller stated that he was the uncle of champion Italian cyclist Ercole Baldini. Any info or help is much appreciated. I’ll start a separated post on the bike as well. V/r Shawn
 

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
Thanks @juvela and @Freqman1
I know there are many omissions, but just showing a small bit of the list makes it quite obvious that it is incomplete. I will add the Velocina brand; feel free to provide any other brands you want. I will double check all submissions. I had Baldini on the list already, but no information on it yet; as with many brands all I have is a name at present. I have added the information provided. I'll check a couple European resources and ask if they might have any input on the Baldini, and I'll keep an eye out for the post if I am not overwhelmed by the new COVID strain. Already lost 60% of our OR Pre-Op staff last week; hoping I won't get bit!
 

dnc1

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
@dnc1 , Here is an excerpt from my Italia Bicyclopedia with the Vecchi entry including your post properly credited and referenced, and surrounded by many other 'well known' Italian brands:
...
Vagner*
(fork crowns; 40s?-80s? *French company, but also utilized by Italian builders)
Vaira (builder?, from Pinerolo Torino; private bike shop selling own brand Italian bikes; Bianchi dealer of Lombardia region)
Valentino (need to research)
Valla (need to research)
Vallorani (need to research)
Valloreia (need to research)
Varsalona (need to research)
Vecchi, Cicli (shop brand?, possible Antonio Alpi built frame?; est. 1938?; address Via Ravenna-38 Roma) [mid-late 1940s? frame example with 2nd-3rd? gen. Cambio Corsa shifting system and internal cable routing on top tube, Libelulla tubing] ["a shop at Via Ravenna 38, Roma is still there in the same form as a small shop; but today it, and the adjacent unit, is an opticians. The optician's shop is owned and run by a Signor Fulvio Vecchi, and their website says that the family has been in operation from this building since 1938! I am guessing that he may be the son, grandson, or great grandson of this bike's originator." {October 2021; from dnc1; https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/cicli-vecchi-roma-italia.199049/unread}]
Vecchietti (need to research)
Vedovati Benedetti (need to research)
Vektor (Magliano Alpi)
Velital (by Olmo, Celle Ligure)
Veloetruria (need to research)
...

That is essentially what my current list looks like. Anything in bold is referenced. As you can see (and can't see); many many names without any info, so much work is left to do.
Thanks for the insight.
I have a better photo now of that other bikes headbadge from a couple of days ago and it looks like I was wrong re. the name.
It is "CICLI G. FIORI" of Forli.
Keep up the great work.
 

dnc1

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
I went out for another practice run today.
15 miles, fairly flat terrain.
Two gear changes attempted, and I'm very happy to report, both attempts were successful!
Finally.....
20220105_135508.jpg
 

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
@dnc1 , glad you were able to get out and give it a good ride. Was the gearing fairly reasonable? It looks like a 46t-48t front; I didn't really look at the rear sizes. I did notice that the freewheel teeth appeared rather "worn" on the 2 smaller cogs. Do you know if that is a designed tooth specifically for these shifting systems, or is it just decades of wear from use? I was wondering before your ride post if that might have affected gear shifting above and beyond the shifting system itself.

While perusing European sales sites I stumbled across an old "Cambio Corsa" frame set for $125 USD (decals were gone so unidentified brand). All I would need to do is spend about $800-$1000 to build it up with the shifting system (I saw the spoke guard on sale recently for $175); that wouldn't even include the wheels or brakes!
 

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
While doing some research on other Campy stuff I ran across this timeline referencing
the Cambio Corsa system. I am not sure if the 1934 entry referring to the advert means that it was published in 1934 also.

"1933
After fabricating parts in the backroom of his father's hardware store (Corsa Padova 101, Vincenza), Tullio starts Campagnolo, S.r.l. with the production of the quick release hub. The sliding hub, dual seatstay rod operated, back pedal derailleur (cambio prototype) is patented on May 4th and introduced in August. The pieces of the prototype derailleur are all handmade requiring a massive investment of time and labor. Fratelli Brivio of Brescia (F.B.) becomes the subcontractor for the parts and supplier of the three-piece (steel barrel with aluminum flanges) hubs. Later, the official corporate name becomes Campagnolo Brevetti Internazionali SpA (translation: Campagnolo International Patents Incorporated).

1934
Cambio a bacchetta (translation: rod changer) or Cambio "CAMPAGNOLO" is the name used for sliding hub, dual seatstay rod operated, back pedal derailleur. The slogan becomes "Senza attriti e senza rumore" (i.e., Friction-free and noise-free). The first advertisement for the Cambio "CAMPAGNOLO" appears in Gazzetta dello Sport."

credit: velo-retro; Chuck Schmidt
 
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