Collectors,,,,what to do about large collection and tires going flat over time?

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John G04

I live for the CABE
Oct 17, 2016
1,971
57
Bethlehem, PA, United States
The only bike I don’t ride often is my 24 inch which is in the house. If I don’t ride any of my bikes in 6 months it gets sold. Also for east coast people as long as its not windy its fun riding the balloners in snow so we can ride all year:p
 

SKPC

I live for the CABE
Feb 2, 2018
1,465
63
Utah - United States
Put more air in the tires. If you don't ride your bikes in a year, I would then sell it or give it to goodwill or some friends who you like. What good does 35 bikes stuffed in a basement or shed do anyone? Not much IMO. I guess you could look at these hidden bikes as future money. Tires though? In terms of old cracked tires on old unridden bikes, I cannot help you with that!!:p I cannot understand why anyone would go on any ride more than 100' with tires like that. I would throw the shot ones away, especially the white walls.:eek:
 
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MrColumbia

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Dec 23, 2009
2,478
Western Mass
I use the RYOBI pump that OLD HOTROD shows above and it works great. No fooling around with power cords, compressors or long air hoses. It pumps up a tire in seconds.
 

nick tures

Finally riding a big boys bike
Jan 25, 2016
241
20
manhattan
I have heard take the valve stem core out and grease it on a new tube ….
 

Gil Mangels

On Training Wheels
Nov 16, 2019
1
77
Polson, Montana
Most of my bikes (about 50 of the 70 some) are hung on display and while a low tire sags a bit, the majority of visitors appreciate seeing the bikes, and only once in a while alert me to a low tire and it's usually informative instead of criticism. For scooters like some of my Cushmans, Doodlebug, Salsbury, and some of the smaller cycles, I cut a wooden block about a 4"x 6" or so shimmed to barely let the tires touch the floor when placed under the frame in the vicinity of the motor/transmission area. The machine is then safely balanced vertically instead of leaning. I agree w/ scrubbinrims that older tubes hold better. With my older cycles, (over 70 dating back to a 1912 Harley) have to bite the bullet and air at least a cuple of times a year. The clinchers are the worst as if the tire pops out of the clinch groove, it's a real pain to get it back w/ wheel still in the bike. On some of my motorbikes, like Whizzers, Simplex, Smith Motor wheel, etc. I have welded about a 5 or 6' piece of 3" channel iron atop a desired length of 2 1/2" pipe on a substantial stand and welded a notched or drilled flat iron piece on each side of channel when placed under the front and rear axles keep weight of the tire. These stands between some of my cycles save floor space. I'm having trouble posting photos, but you might see some of our collection on www.miracleofamericamuseum.org.
 

Barto

I live for the CABE
Mar 13, 2015
1,876
Somers, United States
Most of my bikes (about 50 of the 70 some) are hung on display and while a low tire sags a bit, the majority of visitors appreciate seeing the bikes, and only once in a while alert me to a low tire and it's usually informative instead of criticism. For scooters like some of my Cushmans, Doodlebug, Salsbury, and some of the smaller cycles, I cut a wooden block about a 4"x 6" or so shimmed to barely let the tires touch the floor when placed under the frame in the vicinity of the motor/transmission area. The machine is then safely balanced vertically instead of leaning. I agree w/ scrubbinrims that older tubes hold better. With my older cycles, (over 70 dating back to a 1912 Harley) have to bite the bullet and air at least a cuple of times a year. The clinchers are the worst as if the tire pops out of the clinch groove, it's a real pain to get it back w/ wheel still in the bike. On some of my motorbikes, like Whizzers, Simplex, Smith Motor wheel, etc. I have welded about a 5 or 6' piece of 3" channel iron atop a desired length of 2 1/2" pipe on a substantial stand and welded a notched or drilled flat iron piece on each side of channel when placed under the front and rear axles keep weight of the tire. These stands between some of my cycles save floor space. I'm having trouble posting photos, but you might see some of our collection on www.miracleofamericamuseum.org.
Wow!!!!! Did I say Wow? Well what I meant to say was, Wow!
 
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