Crescent Model No. 10 - Help needed

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Dick Rath

Look Ma, No Hands!
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Dick Rath

Look Ma, No Hands!
Whoops, I hit the wrong button. But heres why I attached these 2 pictures: I need help from someone who has experience with removing the left side crank are on a ladies Crescent Model No. 10 bicycle. I've restored 5 antique Crescents over the past 25 years or so but none have stumped me as this one has as far as disassembling the crank assembly. After removing the left side crank arm nut as seen in picture number 1 it exposed the crank arms internal left hand thread as can be seen in picture number 2. From this point on the problem begins: after firmly clamping the the right side crank arm in a vice my efforts to rotate the leftside crank arm clockwise since the arms exposed internal threads appear, as they should, to be left handed. The arm would not budge; penatrating fluid-no help, tapping- no help, Tapping harder with a lead hammer-no help. Next, after heating witha propane torch to the point of stopping before damage was done to the hardened steel of the crank arm and then, with 4' pipe slid over the crank are for leverage and using all of my strength......nothing.
Am I missing something? You can see in picture number 2 at the bottom of the hole exposed when the nut was removed there is a washer of some sort that has an inward facing tongue pointing and almost touching the threaded shaft; it's purpose I cannot even guess but thought that it somehow might be involved in making my life difficult. Any ideas? Anyone know someone else they might recommend I contact? I'm afraid that anything more drastic in the way of beating the arm with an even larger lead hammer, extending the leverage pipe a few more feet, heating the crank are to red hot and not worry about it's hardness. Somehow it's got to come apart and the pieces must go out to the nickel plater or the restoration procees come to a holt. Any questions or advice? email me directly if you prefer: angelasgrandpa@aol.com or call my cell @ 518-339-7867 Most frustrating to me is that I solved so many "hard to disassemble" cranks, sprockets, hubs, forks, necks, handle bars, etc of 35 years of restoring rusty old basket case bicucles from the turn of the century and to be stumped by one that is sister to at least 5 bikes Crescents that presented no such problems. Any help will be enormously appreciated.

Stay safe my friends.

Dick Rath
Time Machines, Ltd.
Website: timemachineslimited@aol.com



































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Dick Rath
Time Machines, Ltd.
website: timemachineslimited.com

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Rustngrease

Wore out three sets of tires already!
O man I had a heck of a time getting getting a arm off a crescent I am working on. Ended up melting beeswax from a candle down into it , with a pinch of heat on it and finally worked it off , I like the puller idea a little better ha
 

Dick Rath

Look Ma, No Hands!
It looks like it needs a crank puller...you might be able to fabricate one?
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Fordsnake,
Thank you my friend. Analizing the picture you included allowed me to deduce pretty much exactly what I needed; that is what was hidden in the crank housing that I could not see and what the crank puller was desigened and engineered to do. No, unfortunately I didn't have one.....wish I did; however I do have a huge pile of pre 1920 bicycle spares that in one way or another have bailed me out many serious problems that anyone who restores these old beauties will be familiar with. So, seeing what was needed to pull the crank apart I was able to fabricate a puller that allowed me to screw down against the shaft and basicall jack the pedal crank off without doing any damage to the parts. My puller for certain wasn't pretty but with it I was able to continue the bikes disassembly, get the bight finished parts off to the plater and begin the fun part of stripping off the original paint, eeccch. Thanks again; and once again, let me reiterate what a great source The Cabe has been for me insolving some knotty problems, locating parts and obtaining "how to" information that is available nowhere else.
 
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