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Delta Defender Questions

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elginkid

Finally riding a big boys bike
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Does anyone have a diagram or patent drawing for the Delta Defender?

After years and years, I finally have a Delta Defender for the back of the ‘35 Colson. The holes were present, but the light was long gone. I cleaned up all the corrosion from an aging battery, got a new bulb, cleaned up the spring, and when I complete the circuit with a screwdriver it lights up fine. When I put the cover on, the switch doesn’t do anything. I tried bending the contact, and it just made it stay on permanently. I’m trying to figure out exactly how the contact that holds the battery in needs to interface with the switch so that it works reliably. There doesn’t appear to be corrosion on either of the brass contacts on the switch.
 
These things can be a little finicky. It's possible when attaching the cover its moving something just a little interrupting the circuit. I'd keep messing with it and it will work--until you hit the first bump!
 
I've never owned one of these but it looks like the switch needs to connect the battery negative to the case of the lamp. When you see it working are you connecting the batt neg to the base plate? This is my guess at how it should work:
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I noticed that the switch looks like it intentionally has the smaller lower block connected to the frame of the switch. The circuit likely relies on the case sheet metal and the screws to complete the circuit. In the drawing above, that's represented by the yellow line floating in the air to the left of the switch. Make sure there is a good conductive path between both sheet metal parts where the screws join them together mechanically. That is also the electrical connection it looks like.
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If you touch that lower switch block with the battery negative contact, it will stay on all the time.

Inside the switch there is another contact, that slides back on forth with the button, that electrically connects the two brass blocks. If the inside of the switch is corroded you may need to spray some contact cleaner in there, or just push down a little and slide the switch back and forth a few times to clean the metal parts inside.

Original photos credit: @catfish
 
One might be able to supplement the electrical connections made by mechanical contacts (affected by corrosion), by soldering copper electrical wires between the switch contacts (brass blocks) and the other two points.

That would introduce some complexity, especially if disconnect connectors are also added (and 2 wire pieces become 4).
 
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