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Early Lobdell seat recovering

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tacochris

Finally riding a big boys bike
I am making this thread separate from my build thread as Im sure someone else will have this question at some point.
I am in the process of rebuilding my 30's Shelby Traveler and this seat is the first Ive dealt with that is wrapped in this way. I want to make sure Im correct but the fabric appears to be sewn thru the metal flange underneath the seat and folded under. SO, that being said, would I just fold the pinch flange upward, sew the fabric thru the flange and pinch it back downward? Im probably overthinking it but wanted to ask you fine fellows since I know this is the fountain of all knowledge.

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bloo

Finally riding a big boys bike
Sewn through metal?!!

Can I assume the stitches are also visible on the outside? My best guess is you would have to glue it in place to prevent it walking around, and then sew it by hand with a sewing awl and some really heavy thread. Maybe for shoe repair? Not sure what you mean by pinch flange. I can't wait to see how others would approach this.
 

tacochris

Finally riding a big boys bike
Sewn through metal?!!

Can I assume the stitches are also visible on the outside? My best guess is you would have to glue it in place to prevent it walking around, and then sew it by hand with a sewing awl and some really heavy thread. Maybe for shoe repair? Not sure what you mean by pinch flange. I can't wait to see how others would approach this.
Yeah, in places where the fabric is gone, there is tiny holes every 1/4 inch or so for the fabric to be sewn into the flange. As far as showing thru the other side, if the flange was folded open, the stitch would show thru on the other side. Hard to show in the pic but the part the fabric is sewn to is a seperate piece from the outside pan so its stitched in and pinched underneath the pan (Im assuming) Basically the stitching isnt visible on the outside of the seat....
 

tacochris

Finally riding a big boys bike
Lol! As simple as that sounds, the one thing that concerns me is the flange its sewn into folds around the outside of the seat pan and stops about a 1/4" up so its almost as if this piece of pinched metal is only maybe welded onto the outside pan or something. When I bend this flange upwards to sew on the cover, will it detach from the pan itself?
 

AndyA

Finally riding a big boys bike
Tacochris:
Not sure, but I looks like your second picture shows welting that was sewn around the edge of the saddle covering. The construction may not be exactly the same but below are photos of a deconstructed saddle from a Flightliner. Pics show components from the bottom up 1) steel pan (repainted), 2) liner of leather or synthetic leather, 3) synthetic leather cover with fibrous padding, 4) welting. Soft components were sewn together with welting around the entire edge, which held the assembly to the pan. The last photo shows an intact saddle and a good view of the welting. Have fun!
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tacochris

Finally riding a big boys bike
Tacochris:
Not sure, but I looks like your second picture shows welting that was sewn around the edge of the saddle covering. The construction may not be exactly the same but below are photos of a deconstructed saddle from a Flightliner. Pics show components from the bottom up 1) steel pan (repainted), 2) liner of leather or synthetic leather, 3) synthetic leather cover with fibrous padding, 4) welting. Soft components were sewn together with welting around the entire edge, which held the assembly to the pan. The last photo shows an intact saddle and a good view of the welting. Have fun!
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Hey thanks for stepping up with info!
Mine is somewhat similar but the leather is actually sewn directly into the steel flange of the seat pan. I should have taken a closer pic of the pinch but in places where there is no fabric you can see a sew-hole in the steel pinch every 1/4 inch or so.
Im assuming it will go about how I can imagine it should but wanted to throw it out there,
 

Freqman1

Riding a '37 Dayton Super Streamline
Tacochris:
Not sure, but I looks like your second picture shows welting that was sewn around the edge of the saddle covering. The construction may not be exactly the same but below are photos of a deconstructed saddle from a Flightliner. Pics show components from the bottom up 1) steel pan (repainted), 2) liner of leather or synthetic leather, 3) synthetic leather cover with fibrous padding, 4) welting. Soft components were sewn together with welting around the entire edge, which held the assembly to the pan. The last photo shows an intact saddle and a good view of the welting. Have fun!
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Totally different on the Lobdell than this seat. V/r Shawn
 

tacochris

Finally riding a big boys bike
Totally different on the Lobdell than this seat. V/r Shawn
Im probably greatly overthinking how this needs to be done but I was kinda hoping someone else had charted those waters before and had any experience-based advice to throw in before I jump in. Lol
 

Freqman1

Riding a '37 Dayton Super Streamline
I personally don't think this is a seat I would tackle. I had Bob U. do one of these for me early last year. Worth every penny of saved frustration! V/r Shawn

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STRADALITE

I live for the CABE
Don’t be scared of this challenge.
Bend the inner metal piece up to about this point. The nose area will be the toughest part.
Then remove the material.
This is how the seat will look.
Get a curved mattress needle for easier stitching.
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tacochris

Finally riding a big boys bike
Don’t be scared of this challenge.
Bend the inner metal piece up to about this point. The noise area will be the toughest part.
Then remove the material.
This is how the seat will look.
Get a curved mattress needle for easier stitching.
View attachment 1337916

View attachment 1337917

View attachment 1337918

View attachment 1337919
Now THATS the kinda feedback im lookin for! Thanks for the vote of confidence and it looks to be exactly like i expected it to be!
Are you doing any kind of glueing of the fabric or is it all done in the stretch when the pinch is folded back under?
Im all about doing things myself so i will be doing this myself!
 

Freqman1

Riding a '37 Dayton Super Streamline
Boy thats a mighty fine looking seat. Is it just the complexity of the sewing side of things that would make you not want to tackle it?
I know I'm not capable of a pro looking result on the first try and that's the least I will accept. V/r Shawn
 

tacochris

Finally riding a big boys bike
I know I'm not capable of a pro looking result on the first try and that's the least I will accept. V/r Shawn
Im just the kinda crazy who wont accept letting someone else do something i believe i can do i guess. Im willing to mess up to get it right....
 

1motime

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
If you want to try it yourself go for it. All that can happen is you get frustrated and waste a lot of thread.
Just a tip. If you do it yourself or send it out spend some time getting rid of the rust, getting metal as clean as possible and priming with a good rust preventive primer. These pans rot big time! Wet thread, passage of years, and metal. What could go wrong?
 

tacochris

Finally riding a big boys bike
If you want to try it yourself go for it. All that can happen is you get frustrated and waste a lot of thread.
Just a tip. If you do it yourself or send it out spend some time getting rid of the rust, getting metal as clean as possible and priming with a good rust preventive primer. These pans rot big time! Wet thread, passage of years, and metal. What could go wrong?
This is probably the cleanest pan i currently own but im still gonna clean and paint it nice and black before i wrap it.
 
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