Easy spray paint removal.

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TheMonarkMan

Look Ma, No Hands!
All paint is not equal/same. I think you lucked out big time! Nice job, and if I strip another bike I hope I luck out too. I wonder what paint was used on that, most paints aren't bothered that much by gasoline.
I believe OG paint is baked on, spray paint normally doesn't stick as well. Some guys use simple oven clean to strip spray paint. This gasoline was stronger so I didn't have to scrub so hard and starts removing the spray paint and doesn't seem to hurt the orignal paint as long as you don't apply too much pressure with your rag.
 
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SirMike1983

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
All paint is not equal/same. I think you lucked out big time! Nice job, and if I strip another bike I hope I luck out too. I wonder what paint was used on that, most paints aren't bothered that much by gasoline.

This is true. Whatever works and leaves as much original paint as possible should be used.

A lot depends on the pre-spray prep the person did before overspraying. Old paint, especially old baked-on paint will tend to be stable while the new paint won't adhere very well to it. I've had no luck with gasolene, kerosene or denatured alcohol when I tried to strip spray paint. I've had some luck with Xylene and MEK. Acetone will also work but is hard to control and will pull original paint. It also evaporates very quickly. I've had mixed luck with oven cleaner as well. Regular oven cleaner will work but, again is hard to control and will pull original paint. I've had no luck with environmentally-friendly oven cleaner at all.

The last time I did this, I pulled out a 1980s-era bottle of Tru-Value "Stripz 'Em" paint stripper and tried that. It worked very well and pulled spray paint with one wipe. It was like dusting the bike, but it was removing spray paint rather than dust - one wipe and it was back to original paint. Again, in this case there had been no real prep for the spray, so it worked out well. The stripper can and will absolutely pull original paint if you get too aggressive though. I have no idea if this stuff is still sold, but I wish I had tried it sooner because it seems the best of any approach I have tried. I put a tiny amount on a rag and start to act as if I am "dusting" the bike. It beats spraying stuff with oven cleaner and hoping I have not over estimated the pickling time.

I will add though that I tend to avoid bikes where this kind of work is needed in any great quantity. Stripping spray paint is one of my least favorite things.
 

TheMonarkMan

Look Ma, No Hands!
The flash points on Xylene, MEK, Acetone and even Laq. Thiner are hot don't leave it on to long. Most older spry paints were Laq. base, most now days are enamel, so enamel reducer will work too. All are dangerous tho.
Thank you I will keep this in mind
 

TheMonarkMan

Look Ma, No Hands!
This is true. Whatever works and leaves as much original paint as possible should be used.

A lot depends on the pre-spray prep the person did before overspraying. Old paint, especially old baked-on paint will tend to be stable while the new paint won't adhere very well to it. I've had no luck with gasolene, kerosene or denatured alcohol when I tried to strip spray paint. I've had some luck with Xylene and MEK. Acetone will also work but is hard to control and will pull original paint. It also evaporates very quickly. I've had mixed luck with oven cleaner as well. Regular oven cleaner will work but, again is hard to control and will pull original paint. I've had no luck with environmentally-friendly oven cleaner at all.

The last time I did this, I pulled out a 1980s-era bottle of Tru-Value "Stripz 'Em" paint stripper and tried that. It worked very well and pulled spray paint with one wipe. It was like dusting the bike, but it was removing spray paint rather than dust - one wipe and it was back to original paint. Again, in this case there had been no real prep for the spray, so it worked out well. The stripper can and will absolutely pull original paint if you get too aggressive though. I have no idea if this stuff is still sold, but I wish I had tried it sooner because it seems the best of any approach I have tried. I put a tiny amount on a rag and start to act as if I am "dusting" the bike. It beats spraying stuff with oven cleaner and hoping I have not over estimated the pickling time.

I will add though that I tend to avoid bikes where this kind of work is needed in any great quantity. Stripping spray paint is one of my least favorite things.
Acetone was the first thing I tried, then the oven cleaner. Either were worked very well. I'm super happy with using gas, just have to rub softly so you don't take OG paint off.
 

TheMonarkMan

Look Ma, No Hands!
This is true. Whatever works and leaves as much original paint as possible should be used.

A lot depends on the pre-spray prep the person did before overspraying. Old paint, especially old baked-on paint will tend to be stable while the new paint won't adhere very well to it. I've had no luck with gasolene, kerosene or denatured alcohol when I tried to strip spray paint. I've had some luck with Xylene and MEK. Acetone will also work but is hard to control and will pull original paint. It also evaporates very quickly. I've had mixed luck with oven cleaner as well. Regular oven cleaner will work but, again is hard to control and will pull original paint. I've had no luck with environmentally-friendly oven cleaner at all.

The last time I did this, I pulled out a 1980s-era bottle of Tru-Value "Stripz 'Em" paint stripper and tried that. It worked very well and pulled spray paint with one wipe. It was like dusting the bike, but it was removing spray paint rather than dust - one wipe and it was back to original paint. Again, in this case there had been no real prep for the spray, so it worked out well. The stripper can and will absolutely pull original paint if you get too aggressive though. I have no idea if this stuff is still sold, but I wish I had tried it sooner because it seems the best of any approach I have tried. I put a tiny amount on a rag and start to act as if I am "dusting" the bike. It beats spraying stuff with oven cleaner and hoping I have not over estimated the pickling time.

I will add though that I tend to avoid bikes where this kind of work is needed in any great quantity. Stripping spray paint is one of my least favorite things.
They definitely didn't prep the fender very well which was good for me. I'd rather strip paint then polish chrome rims! LOL
 

Andrew Gorman

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
My go to is goof off graffitti remover. Watch it carefully and wipe it down with burlap or a red shop rag- the chicom rags tend to bleed a little but it does not show.
 

TheMonarkMan

Look Ma, No Hands!
Recently discovered how to remove spray paint from the fenders on my Shelby and the trick worked amazing! Seen online where a guy used gasoline and it worked! Tried the oven cleaner technique but I think gas works way better! Thought I would share the tip! Happy riding and collecting! Here's a before and after!

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