Help with shipping Black Phantom

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Coachmule

Look Ma, No Hands!
Mar 24, 2020
44
55
San Diego, CA, USA
I'm new to this so any help would be appreciated. I need to ship a black phantom from Philly to San diego, can anyone recommend how to do this through what company?
 

John G04

I live for the CABE
Oct 17, 2016
1,980
57
Bethlehem, PA, United States
What size box would I put that size bike in? Sorry my cousin is shipping it to me and knows as much as I do about shipping this beast.
You have to go to a bike shop and get a box. Then once you have a box you just measure that and plug the numbers into the website and it gives you a price. Shipping will probably be around $80.
 
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bobcycles

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Sep 30, 2006
4,805
13
so cal beaches
Some tips

Often times bike shops are the absolute worst option shipping a bike..You pay through the nose...typcaiy 60 -100
just for the pack job and they very often do a horrendous job with vintage bikes.

Your best bet.
1 determine if the bike is a nice original or a junker/parts bike

Junker ...completely disassemble it your self...hit your local bikeshop for a Free empty bike box
Be sure adult size 26" or larger bike...You can fit a complete Phantom in on adult size box..
tight, but it fits.

If it's a NICE bike...same routine completely disassemble and use 2 boxes so you won't risk
the damage.

By all accounts AVOID bike shops for packing vintage bikes..I've been down that road when there was no
other option (elderly seller etc) and majority of the time...the bike got eft up in some way due to monkeys
at the shop doing this task.

It is NOT rocket science to pack and ship a bike.

bike shops make plenty of dough with repair work... save your vintage Phantom from the mishandling that will occur.
and put that $ in your pocket instead.

Ship with SHIPBIKES.COM and save $
 

fattyre

I live for the CABE
Oct 22, 2014
1,027
Chicagoland
I agree bike shops packing can a pretty big gamble. Shipping bikes is a pita an anxiety causing endeavor. You might find the exact right person todo the job well at a shop, but dumb high school kids also work in bike shops too. Another factor is time of year. Spring summer and early fall? Forget it. Especially somewhere where there are cold winters. People are ready to go in the spring and bike shops are typically very busy starting this time of year. Also factor in COVID 19 (my friend in Chicago says they are slammed with repairs already?!) They have plenty of ways to make money easier than spending the time to pack an old bike right. Perhaps you can find someone on here to help or a solid recommendation on a shop to go to.
 
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piercer_99

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Dec 27, 2015
2,239
59
Sanger, TX
another option, would be, find a caber in the Philly area, who has experience shipping bikes and enlist their help on getting it to you.

Someone with experience in this is always a plus.

I have received bikes that have been packed with care, and I have received them that have been packed with air.

Care is better, reduces the risk of damage.

Finally, no matter how well they are packed, there is always a risk of damage in transit. Even if you drive it across country yourself.
 

kreika

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Dec 7, 2016
3,013
51
Santa Cruz
Great advice above. Bike shops these days are used to road bikes and mountain bikes. Take off the front wheel, turn the bars sideways and call it good. Vintage bikes need better care for shipping. If your Phantom is in good shape go the extra mile. Make sure nothing is metal on metal and has sufficient padding/protection. I’d recommend Fedex over Ups. Good luck! Post a pic of your phantom if you get a chance. We do love pics.
 

Coachmule

Look Ma, No Hands!
Mar 24, 2020
44
55
San Diego, CA, USA
Thanks for all the input, wholly cow my brain is going to explode. My cousin wrapped it in bubble wrapped taped it really well, took off handle bars, and is usually a freak to make sure things get done right. He went and picked up a large box and is looking at Uship and shipbikes.com.
 

rustjunkie

Moderator
Staff member
Jul 11, 2012
13,694
Monrovia, CA 91016
www.rustjunkies.com
Thanks for all the input, wholly cow my brain is going to explode. My cousin wrapped it in bubble wrapped taped it really well, took off handle bars, and is usually a freak to make sure things get done right. He went and picked up a large box and is looking at Uship and shipbikes.com.
amtrak
i've shipped and rec'd many bikes in SD with them
safest way imo:
call station(s) nearby to confirm they accept bikes and have a box for you, or if already boxed ask if they'll take it that way
remove pedals, saddle, handlebars, and package them in a small box or wrap in bubble
take bike to amtrak
roll bike into box, put the parts in, tape up
near zero handling, loaded onto train, unloaded, you pick up
improper packaging aside, damage occurs during handling by shippers, fedex (shipbikes) and ups have many handling points often with long drops.
 
Last edited:

Coachmule

Look Ma, No Hands!
Mar 24, 2020
44
55
San Diego, CA, USA
amtrak
i've shipped and rec'd many bikes in SD with them
safest way imo:
call station(s) nearby to confirm they accept bikes and have a box for you, or if already boxed ask if they'll take it that way
remove pedals, saddle, handlebars, and package them in a small box or wrap in bubble
take bike to amtrak
roll bike into box, put the parts in, tape up
near zero handling, loaded onto train, unloaded, you pick up
improper packaging aside, damage occurs in handling during shippers, fedex (shipbikes) and ups have many handling points often with long drops.
Cousin got a box from the bike shipping company especially for Phantoms. My cousin is a freak so I know it's going to be packed right. He's like you'll be able to drop it out of C-130 when I'm done. I'll update everyone next week.
 

SirMike1983

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 27, 2008
3,201
Inactive
It's certainly doable for a first-timer, but it's important to pad all sheet metal parts carefully, and to fully inner-box or wrap hard parts (e.g., pedals, stem, etc.) so that they do not become battering rams inside the box. The perimeter should be fully padded, that is to say - no bike parts in direct contact with the outer surface of the box. Make sure there is padding all around the edges. Make sure the front and/or rear forks are supported so that they do not get bent or collapsed in if the box ends up on its side.

The thing some people forget is that you don't just disassemble and pack, you want to take the individual assemblies that you take off the bike, and then fully wrap those or put them in their own little boxes that then go inside the main box. I've had people come to me with damaged bikes in the past, where someone just took off the pedals and dropped them into the box loose. They turn into battering rams inside the box once things start to shake about en-route. If you're lucky they sift to the bottom and stay down there. If you're unlucky they beat the hell out of everything on the way down during the ride.
 
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Coachmule

Look Ma, No Hands!
Mar 24, 2020
44
55
San Diego, CA, USA
It's certainly doable for a first-timer, but it's important to pad all sheet metal parts carefully, and to fully inner-box or wrap hard parts (e.g., pedals, stem, etc.) so that they do not become battering rams inside the box. The perimeter should be fully padded, that is to say - no bike parts in direct contact with the outer surface of the box. Make sure there is padding all around the edges. Make sure the front and/or rear forks are supported so that they do not get bent or collapsed in if the box ends up on its side.

The thing some people forget is that you don't just disassemble and pack, you want to take the individual assemblies that you take off the bike, and then fully wrap those or put them in their own little boxes that then go inside the main box. I've had people come to me with damaged bikes in the past, where someone just took off the pedals and dropped them into the box loose. They turn into battering rams inside the box once things start to shake about en-route. If you're lucky they sift to the bottom and stay down there. If you're unlucky they beat the hell out of everything on the way down during the ride.
I'll find out in a few days, he said he took the handle bars off and the front wheel, he totally wrapped every part in bubble wrap, honestly I'm not going to stress over it , it is what it is. Good advice going forward if I decide to do this again.
 
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