Hi my Grandpap has a 1883 American Star bicycle


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Colbz

Look Ma, No Hands!
Jun 27, 2018
59
25
32
USA
#4
I'll have to get some he just told me about it tonight actually when i saw him for my grams birthday and he pulled out this white paper and asked if i could look something up for him cause he dont do computers and i have no clue on vintage bikes so i figured someone on here does lol. And i could find very few things on the internet about it only seen 3 on ebay for 5k, 5k and 12k but there not the same name as this and the one had some missing spokes.
 

TR6SC

I live for the CABE
Jun 12, 2016
1,003
2,619
66
Eureka, CA
#7
This is probably a bike you would want to keep. The Star was pivotal in the transition from High Wheels to the chain drive safety. Although it didn't use pedals, it did have that ratcheting hub that allowed for a larger effective wheel size (speed). It was also rear wheel driven and front wheel steered, a new concept. It was a cycle that didn't need to be sized to the riders leg length. Short people pedaled (treadled) up high, while the taller folk worked the treadles nearer the bottom. And, because power to the wheel was not dependent on the orientation of the crank arm to the wheel, power was supplied as fast as one could pump, i.e. FAST.
This is a rare bird that would be a very special heirloom. You're gonna wanna teach your grandkids to ride it.
 
Last edited:

Colbz

Look Ma, No Hands!
Jun 27, 2018
59
25
32
USA
#8
This is probably a bike you would want to keep. The Star was pivotal in the transition from High Wheels to the chain drive safety. Although it didn't use pedals, it did have that ratcheting hub that allowed for a larger effective wheel size (speed). It was also rear wheel driven and front wheel steered, a new concept. It was a cycle that didn't need to be sized to the riders leg length. Short people pedaled (treadled) up high, while the taller folk worked the treadles nearer the bottom. And, because power to the wheel was not dependent on the orientation of the crank arm to the wheel, power was supplied as fast as one could pump, i.e. FAST.
This is a rare bird that would be a very special heirloom. You're gonna wanna teach your grandkids to ride it.
Thanks man i could not find anything hardly on this bike on the internet it's my grandparents so idn what there going to do with it i think he wants to get a price on it then sell it..I'll have to go out and take pictures of it tomorrow or the next day and post them on here. I couldnt find any information on it and found this site and figured someobdy has to no something about these kinda bikes i didnt relize it was such a rare piece thanks TR.
 
Likes: tripple3

TR6SC

I live for the CABE
Jun 12, 2016
1,003
2,619
66
Eureka, CA
#9
Thanks man i could not find anything hardly on this bike on the internet it's my grandparents so idn what there going to do with it i think he wants to get a price on it then sell it..I'll have to go out and take pictures of it tomorrow or the next day and post them on here. I couldnt find any information on it and found this site and figured someobdy has to no something about these kinda bikes i didnt relize it was such a rare piece thanks TR.
It's not so much about rare. There are quite a few bikes in the game where only a handful exist. These bikes will out-value the Star. The Star was in it's day relatively popular, so more than a handful exist today. My grandson just rode his first 26 inch balloon tire tank bike with a rack and fenders and a light. He loved the horn. The lay person couldn't tell you if he was on a Huffy or an Aerocycle, but he got compliments. People love these bikes. The Huffy finds its way into the dump. The Aerocycle...Well, just ask Val. The Aero is an icon, PERIOD. Not for sale. Like Bond's Aston Martin DB5. Not for sale. I remember dumping a VW 23 window Safari....
 

Craig Allen

Finally riding a big boys bike
Jun 23, 2016
112
248
64
Millville NJ
#10
The early Stars had a definite clicking sound as the ratchets moved around the hub and cannot be wheeled backwards. If you try forcing it the ratchets will break and then you got problems. Later Stars are the silent type and can be moved backwards.
 

Colbz

Look Ma, No Hands!
Jun 27, 2018
59
25
32
USA
#12
It's not so much about rare. There are quite a few bikes in the game where only a handful exist. These bikes will out-value the Star. The Star was in it's day relatively popular, so more than a handful exist today. My grandson just rode his first 26 inch balloon tire tank bike with a rack and fenders and a light. He loved the horn. The lay person couldn't tell you if he was on a Huffy or an Aerocycle, but he got compliments. People love these bikes. The Huffy finds its way into the dump. The Aerocycle...Well, just ask Val. The Aero is an icon, PERIOD. Not for sale. Like Bond's Aston Martin DB5. Not for sale. I remember dumping a VW 23 window Safari....
Got a ? for you im almost 100% positive he has and 1881 american star first year ever made which i no has a lot of value do you no how many were made the first year? i no it was a small company in new jersey i dont believe they even made 100 of them in the first year. I no that because it dont have brakes and the first year american star ever made a bike they made them without brakes until 1882 when people were complaining.
 

Colbz

Look Ma, No Hands!
Jun 27, 2018
59
25
32
USA
#13
Or does anyone know how many were made the first year i cant find any information or any 1881 bikes online in either antique bike shops or bike museums the earliest ive seen was like 1884
 

Colbz

Look Ma, No Hands!
Jun 27, 2018
59
25
32
USA
#14
IMG_0005.jpg
The vast collection of bicycles at the Bicycle Museum of
America is made all the more impressive by the
tremendous amount of cycling-related items and
materials that accompany the displays.
Among some of the most notable bicycles is an 1816 Draisine, which is one of only six that are known to exist in the world. In addition to that, the museum also has an 1850 Ward Quadricycle, an 1870 Boneshaker, an 1881 American Star, an 1887 American Safety, an 1891 Victor Light Roadster, an 1897 Waverly, an 1898 Old Hickory, and so many others.
 

Freqman1

Riding a '37 Dayton Super Streamline
Jul 14, 2009
16,014
16,606
Evans, GA
#15
View attachment 857261 The vast collection of bicycles at the Bicycle Museum of
America is made all the more impressive by the
tremendous amount of cycling-related items and
materials that accompany the displays.
Among some of the most notable bicycles is an 1816 Draisine, which is one of only six that are known to exist in the world. In addition to that, the museum also has an 1850 Ward Quadricycle, an 1870 Boneshaker, an 1881 American Star, an 1887 American Safety, an 1891 Victor Light Roadster, an 1897 Waverly, an 1898 Old Hickory, and so many others.
Been there done that
 

Colbz

Look Ma, No Hands!
Jun 27, 2018
59
25
32
USA
#18
My orginial original post i thought it was an 1883 but i believe its an 1881 the first year they were made i was asking if anyone new how many were made in 1881 i no there was not many because they didnt come with brakes the first year and they didnt make alot for that reason until 1882 when they made it with brakes
 

Colbz

Look Ma, No Hands!
Jun 27, 2018
59
25
32
USA
#19
Im going to find out tomorrow when i call a few shops and museums to find out i just thought maybe 1 of you guys maybe new cause u cant find to much information on this bike.
 
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