His & Hers Raleigh bikes find

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Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
I had not really looked closely at your photos, but the decals match (or very nearly match) my 1970 Sports (different model than yours), and the shifter with the plastic guard dates it more to the late 60s if it is original. I do not believe the gold bands were used for more than a couple years. My Sports happened to have an odd hub date code of 69 13 (last 2 numbers of year and number of calender month); but only 12 months per year so dates technically to what should be 70 01 (Jan. 1970). My OE shifter is the same as yours and was presumably the last year that style was used. My '72 has the next newer style shifter with same plastic guard, but different script (black letters with outline banner and no red 3 speed marking. B.72 is definitely the proper saddle for the period and is most likely OE.

My '70 Sports, and '41-'43 roadster (before completion).
1733839
 

jimbo53

I live for the CABE
When I started collecting vintage British bikes at the start of the pandemic, my first bike(s) were this 74 Sports Jack and Jill set just like yours. (Pics as found) Great riders, and the paint and chrome were high quality, which meant a pretty easy clean and lube. New tires and tubes got me on the road. These rod brake bikes are a bit of a niche market due to Rube Goldberg mechanicals and less than efficient stopping power…non-existent in the rain. Have fun!
1733848

1733849
 

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
When I started collecting vintage British bikes at the start of the pandemic, my first bike(s) were this 74 Sports Jack and Jill set just like yours. (Pics as found) Great riders, and the paint and chrome were high quality, which meant a pretty easy clean and lube. New tires and tubes got me on the road. These rod brake bikes are a bit of a niche market due to Rube Goldberg mechanicals and less than efficient stopping power…non-existent in the rain. Have fun!
At least those mid 70s and later bikes had the model on them. I would assume the OP's bikes are probably of the same model or variant thereof (Dawn Tourist, et al.)
 

SirMike1983

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
That article about the shifters is generally pretty good. A note on the quadrant - the one shown is the type made for the AW and the K. The article notes it's for the K, but the one shown is the later AW/K type. There is an earlier, flat-faced series of quadrants that is specifically for the K.

The embossed 1938-48 GC3 comes in two models - a black faced one and a plain brass faced variety. Both are uncommon (rarer than the quadrant) and both have a fragile external flat spring.

The model 1948-49 GC2 silver face and black face are rare as well, used only for a year or two. Both are rarer than the quadrant.

The 1950s shifters have overlaps in production. The article's order of shifters looks generally right to me. There is a significant overlap in production on 1950s shifters, with multiple variants produced at the same time, especially in the mid-1950s era shifters.

The model GC3B from the late 1950s, I would guess goes out about 1960 or so. I've had 1958 and 1959 bikes with those shifters, but around 1960 or so the "thumb shifter" style comes in. I think the article is right about the 1960 estimated date for the transition.

A note on the early 1970s shifter with the italic block type text - I would guess runs through 1976, when the black plastic comes into use.
 

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
That article about the shifters is generally pretty good. A note on the quadrant - the one shown is the type made for the AW and the K. The article notes it's for the K, but the one shown is the later AW/K type. There is an earlier, flat-faced series of quadrants that is specifically for the K.

The embossed 1938-48 GC3 comes in two models - a black faced one and a plain brass faced variety. Both are uncommon (rarer than the quadrant) and both have a fragile external flat spring.

The model 1948-49 GC2 silver face and black face are rare as well, used only for a year or two. Both are rarer than the quadrant.

The 1950s shifters have overlaps in production. The article's order of shifters looks generally right to me. There is a significant overlap in production on 1950s shifters, with multiple variants produced at the same time, especially in the mid-1950s era shifters.

The model GC3B from the late 1950s, I would guess goes out about 1960 or so. I've had 1958 and 1959 bikes with those shifters, but around 1960 or so the "thumb shifter" style comes in. I think the article is right about the 1960 estimated date for the transition.

A note on the early 1970s shifter with the italic block type text - I would guess runs through 1976, when the black plastic comes into use.
Thanks a lot for this info Mike. I hope you do not mind if I anotate my print out of the shifter history with what you provided. Everything helps and I will scan my copies with the added info so next time there will be an even more complete reference resource should it be needed.
 
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