How do you fix a grooved (from use) Race?

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popawheelie

Finally riding a big boys bike
Hi all, my Floating Hub on my Miss America was shaking, so I took it apart. Then I found out the bearings were fine, but the Races have grooves in them from 71 years of wear.
How can I fill those grooves and keep the integrity of the races?

It's been suggested that I buy another hub and use it, but if I do, there's no guarantee that the "new" hub won't have the same problem. Plus it's a shame to waste a large and unusual hub like that just because of grooved races.
Can the groove be filled by welding into the groove, and then carefully grind/sand the excess off? Seems like it should be machined to make it right, but seems like an even more costly adventure.
What do you suggest?
Mike at my.ironwork@verizon.net
 

HIGGINSFOREVER

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Your best bet would be to just buy a new set of bearings and pack then (lube) good.Then wait another 71 years and see what happens.
 

Andrew Gorman

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Fixing the grooves is a machine shop job, BUT a bicycle hub is a pretty unstressed application. Use a stone to smooth off any rough edges and re-assemble the hub with new ball bearings and grease and it will probably work just fine. A "slip stone" that matches the cone can help. Here is a link to an expensive and elaborate set:
http://www.thebestthings.com/newtools/norton_slips.htm
to give you an idea what they look like.
 

pedal alley

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Fixing the grooves is a machine shop job, BUT a bicycle hub is a pretty unstressed application. Use a stone to smooth off any rough edges and re-assemble the hub with new ball bearings and grease and it will probably work just fine. A "slip stone" that matches the cone can help. Here is a link to an expensive and elaborate set:
http://www.thebestthings.com/newtools/norton_slips.htm
to give you an idea what they look like.

those aren't necessary .just use a round file.
 

1959firearrow

Wore out three sets of tires already!
In my own opinion it may not be totally correct but I would buy some carbide head porting bits,a high speed dremel tool,and weld the grove then carefully use the bits to make the weld the desired shape. This could get expensive if you don't have the tools already but probably cheaper that a machine shop as long as you have access to a welder.
 

greenephantom

Wore out three sets of tires already!
I'm not familiar with the internals of this hub, but is it possible to remove the races? If you can remove them, then you can likely replace them with decent used races from less desirable sacrificial hub.

Example: I've had several Krate Atom drum hubs with destroyed races, they felt like crap and sounded like crap. Atom used the same race on common rear hubs that take a freewheel, easily found on Schwinn Exercisers. A few minutes with an angle grinder to extract races from the Exerciser hub, a couple minutes to knock out the Atom races with a punch, a couple minutes to press the "new" races in, done.

Cheers, Geoff
 

Old-Bikes

Finally riding a big boys bike
I've fitted a hub shell on a press drill, then used a Dremel with emery cloth on a kind of paddle wheel and I ground the race as it was spinning... this way you are sure you grind it evenly. a bit difficult for races but works a treat on cones! it's worht a try. :)
 
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