Identification help, please

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rjb1

On Training Wheels
I just bought this one and hope that someone can tell me what kind it is and when it was made.
Thanks,
Joel
 

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RMS37

I live for the CABE
Hi Joel,

This bike is a Cleveland Welding built bicycle. It is a postwar bike and the serial number along with the shape of the downtube and the dropouts dates the bike to 1947-1949. I would guess the bike is from the early end of that period. The frame style is the Straight-Bar style, which was developed for the Luxury Liner models and trickled down to be used on other, lesser equipped, models.

I suspect that the chain ring was swapped out at some time because CWC predominantly still used 1” pitch drivelines during that time. It was probably changed to allow for the use of ½” chain, which is more readily available

The stem and front fender are correct for the bike but the forward most fender brace is on backwards.

Looking at the photos it appears that there is a fillet weld at the joint between the head tube and the top tube, this joint is atypical for this frame as this is usually an internally lugged, electro-forged junction; it may be that this joint failed and was repaired with a fillet weld.

What is not possible from the photos is the ability to determine how the bike was originally badged and branded. CWC sold these bikes through many distributors and retailers and while the location of the badge holes and their spacing or a ghosting of the original badge under the repaint might shed some light, it is still often does not provide conclusive evidence.
 

rjb1

On Training Wheels
Thanks Phil, I was most curious about the date of manufacture. If it was some rare type the manufacturer or seller might be more important.
The post-manufacture fillet welds, presumably a repair job, are an interesting aspect. My dad owned a welding business, and his policy was never to charge kids for bike repairs. Over a number of decades there is no telling how many bicycles he fixed for free.
I have all the parts for this one, and for $25, it is worth cleaning up, painting, and restoring (At least I think so...).
Thanks again,
Joel
 
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