Model D conversion

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jacob9795

I live for the CABE
Sep 21, 2014
1,098
Central Valley, CA, United States
Does anyone know of an aftermarket 24T cog that’ll work on the model D hubs? Has anyone ever modified these hubs to fit ceramic bearings?
 
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fattyre

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Oct 22, 2014
934
Chicagoland
Ceramic bearings? Can't tell if thats a joke or not.

On a hub that chews up its own races under normal load and has tons of friction with the brake disks constantly dragging?

Morrow for the best vintage reliability or buy a modern bike.

You could just buy loose ceramic balls and use them if you'd like, but my guess is the only benefits you'll notice are talking to others about your ceramic bearings.

 
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jacob9795

I live for the CABE
Sep 21, 2014
1,098
Central Valley, CA, United States
Should we polish the friction disks and use oil only? That makes sense as to why the oil insert is there. When I open these hubs up, the races usually have worn spots in them, and I can’t imagine the original bearings to be as round as they once were.
My idea is to reduce friction due to wear in a hub just for fun.
I was thinking of an enclosed bearing insert that you set in there and ceramic came up but I see that there are steel versions too. It sounds like cyclists argue over what their bearings are made out of.
 
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vincev

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Nov 2, 2008
13,151
crown point<indiana
Interesting concept. Nothing wrong in experimenting. I would not go through that expense unless you are planning some really high mileage on this bike.Good luck and post results.
 

fordmike65

Riding a '37 Colson Imperial
Mar 4, 2012
19,942
East Los
When I was into R/C racing, ceramic bearings were the way to go if you wanted to shave an ounce or so off your competitive buggy or 1/10th scale on-road car. I've heard the roadie hype on using them on their lightweight road bikes. I can't see it making a noticeable difference on a ballooner. Just replace any worn or pitted races/cones and pop new bearings into your cages. On ND hubs, I use a Scotchbrite pad or sandpaper to scuff up the brake disc surfaces. I used to soak them in 30wt motor oil before installing & had pretty good results. After a couple screechers, I started lathering them up with a mixture of Park grease & oil. That worked better, but after a few hard stops they'd start making noise again. My latest is to use a grease my shop mistakenly ordered, but ended up working quite well so far. Sta-Lube New generation Wheel Bearing Grease. I currently have this in at least 4 bikes without any noise or issues. Until I do, it's the one I'll continue to use.
1578934887607.png
 

fattyre

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Oct 22, 2014
934
Chicagoland
@jacob9795

I too have day dreamed about a precision coaster hub that could go the distance. One you could use for some actual heavy duty off road use or hundreds miles of adjustment free normal riding. Dust seals, less slop in the driver and of course oversized precision bearing races with a more reliable adjustment system that stays adjusted. Maybe even an adjustment for the brake engagement free play as long as I'm dreaming.

Problem is who would buy it? A money loser for sure. It would take some serious effort to engineer, produce and test.

I just take it for what it is. I see no way to improve any of these hubs other than maintenance and ultimately replacement with good or new parts. Morrow holds up the best for me as long as you have a good stock of #113 & #114. Those teeth can get chewed up pretty quickly riding single track (because coaster brake single track MTB'ing can be extremely fun as long as you keep those pedals off the ground!).

And yeah, I think ceramic bearings are a gimmick in low rpm bicycle applications. You gain more by having no dust seals...
 
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Gordon

I live for the CABE
May 22, 2006
1,870
Ottertail, MN
With regard to your question about using a 24 tooth cog, I "think" you can change the ND driver, clutch, transfer spring and driver dust cap with those from a Mattatuck. The Mattatuck driver accepts the 3 lug cogs and I know Bendix made a 22 tooth.
 

jacob9795

I live for the CABE
Sep 21, 2014
1,098
Central Valley, CA, United States
I’m just bored. No business ideas here.
When I was into road bikes, I put all dura ace on my bike thinking it’s the bike that made me slow, that’s when I found out that it was me that needed to be replaced on the bike.

The only way around the friction disk is to machine a similar hub and go with a freewheel and disk brake, but I wanted the hotrod idea to be discreet. Might as well go with a modern hub and skip having to buy a metal lathe and drill press.

I know a guy who knew a guy that machined an old hub for better bearings, it might be an urban legend, I’ll have to shake the bushes around town and find the guy.
 

jacob9795

I live for the CABE
Sep 21, 2014
1,098
Central Valley, CA, United States
With regard to your question about using a 24 tooth cog, I "think" you can change the ND driver, clutch, transfer spring and driver dust cap with those from a Mattatuck. The Mattatuck driver accepts the 3 lug cogs and I know Bendix made a 22 tooth.
Thanks I’ll check into this, I’m just trying to save my knees and stay on a vintage bike
 
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