Model year of Mom’s childhood Rudge Whitworth

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GRANDPAS_RIDE

'Lil Knee Scuffer
Hello all,

If anyone is able to help me determine the model name and year of my Rudge Whitworth step through frame bicycle I would greatly appreciate it. The bicycle was purchased used for my mother in 1956 for $25 by my grandparents.

I’d also be interested to know where it was manufactured or any other information you may be able to provide.

The serial number is stamped on the top left hand side of the seat tube. It has a BC on top with 65396 stamped below that. I have attached a photo of the serial number and the entire bike.

Thanks If you are able to assist.

Grandpa’s Ride

ABCA0C3D-55BC-4CFC-AF2A-75E692FE8E98.jpeg


6DAC189F-05D5-476F-AD55-A197DE629F88.jpeg


F278BDB3-65DB-42CC-ACB2-4C104EE686A5.jpeg
 

bulldog1935

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Raleigh took over Rudge-Whitworth in 1943.
Your frame number scheme matches Raleigh post 1955, and I doubt if you can narrow it down closer than you already know.
Likely manufactured in Nottingham.

Unfortunately, date code is NA for Sturmey coaster-brake hubs.

One on-line reference for a wartime Rudge has 5 digits and a single letter.
This serial number was posted for a known 1938 - A592537

The pre-Raleigh badge said Coventry
rudgedecal.jpg


There may be more information at Rudge Enthusiasts Club in UK, but their website is blocked for malware.
maybe @dnc1 can provide better information.
 
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dnc1

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Raleigh took over Rudge-Whitworth in 1943.
Your frame number scheme matches Raleigh post 1955, and I doubt if you can narrow it down closer than you already know.
Likely manufactured in Nottingham.

Unfortunately, date code is NA for Sturmey coaster-brake hubs.

One on-line reference for a wartime Rudge has 5 digits and a single letter.
This serial number was posted for a known 1938 - A592537

The pre-Raleigh badge said Coventry
View attachment 1628167

There may be more information at Rudge Enthusiasts Club in UK, but their website is blocked for malware.
maybe @dnc1 can provide better information.
@bulldog1935 is probably correct re. the frame number being from around 1955.
Definitely produced in Nottingham.
Probably the last year of the ladies 'loop frame' design as it doesn't feature in their '56 catalogue.
Here are some images from the V-CC library site of the '54 catalogue.
Unfortunately there is no Canadian export catalogue available online and the only '54 catalogue is the Belgian version, hence the French/Flemish wording.
Cover.....
Screenshot_20220518-110744_Chrome.jpg


...looks like yours is (based on) is the 'Model 10L'.....
Screenshot_20220518-110756_Chrome.jpg


...here are colour options for that year.....
Screenshot_20220518-110708_Chrome.jpg


...if your paint is original, it could either be a faded Red, or perhaps the Orange.

I hope that helps.
 
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GRANDPAS_RIDE

'Lil Knee Scuffer
Thanks for the replies. Maybe I should start a new thread for a question I have, but I’m going to throw it out anyway.
I am trying to remove the cranks and the pin is either seized or threaded in. Does anyone have a disassembly procedure? I hope the photos I have included are useful.
Thanks

71D6A336-2D24-41E4-A0E2-26CED9FD26FB.jpeg


36A3B1DA-7E3E-4EF3-AF19-DF6887CFEF04.jpeg


6D6AA593-64D9-4E58-BB13-F134370B377B.jpeg


D1C97B86-EBE1-4EB8-87DA-4AEFC7A82A22.jpeg


E5A8AA16-60BC-4B9C-918D-A0DE64533720.jpeg
 

dnc1

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
You will probably need a cotter pin removal tool/press.
The best ones are actually available from your side of the pond from:


It looks like this.....
Screenshot_20220524-143414_Chrome.jpg




Alternatively you can use something like a small 'G-Clamp' with a small socket acting as a spacer on the non-threaded side of the cotter pin.

Or, you could use a large hammer, LOL, the method used by every small boy in England back in the day!

I'm not suggesting you do it, but often, if you screw the nut back on (to protect the threads) and give it a sharp tap with a hammer (from the threaded side) it may well free up and pop out.
Be warned though that this may well damage the crank axle bearings and cups on an old frame.


These cotter pins are not threaded into the crank but are a cylindrical shape, with a taper ground on one face, forming a wedge, as in this photo.....
Screenshot_20220524-142854_Chrome.jpg



...they are often awkward to remove.
 

juvela

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
-----

the heads of both wedgebolts appear to have been mushroomed by pounding

this is not a good sign

possible you may discover the bearing races to be brinelled when you get things disassembled

using a C-clamp as a press; can be used for both removal and installation -

1632926


the machine's chainset appears to be a Nicklin product

----
 

dnc1

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
-----

the heads of both wedgebolts appear to have been mushroomed by pounding

this is not a good sign

possible you may discover the bearing races to be brinelled when you get things disassembled

using a C-clamp as a press; can be used for both removal and installation -

View attachment 1632926

the machine's chainset appears to be a Nicklin product

----
That's what I suggested, but apologies for not realising that you guys call them "C-Clamps"; across the pond they are "G-Clamps" over here.
 
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GRANDPAS_RIDE

'Lil Knee Scuffer
Thank you @dnc1 and @juvela

I really appreciate the help. I love the visuals. I have a C-Clamp that I can try. At one time I would have got the hammer out first and then tried to recover later. I must be getting a little smarter with age.

I’ll post a few photos of the finished product when it’s rolling.
 

SirMike1983

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
I know Sheldon Brown's website described bolstering the crank and smacking the pin end with a hammer, but I never really liked that method. It's just too hard to control the blow unless you've done it that way... many times. You also do not know how embedded the pin is until you subject it to force. If you strike hard on a pin that moves, you can end up smashing right through the pin (pin goes flying) and put a nice mash in the crank side. If the pin is frozen up solid, you can quickly mushroom the pin end. The thing is that you just don't know what you're hitting until you hit it and find out...

The clamp and socket piece method at least lets you apply gradual pressure until the point that the pin moves. The press works the same way - no excessive force needed, just enough to move the pin. The downside of the wrench and socket piece method is that it may not work if the pin is really, really frozen in place. The Bikesmith style press will get those. The Bikesmith press is capable of a great deal of force, but it allows you to control how much force you use so that it's just enough for the job.
 
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