Model year of Mom’s childhood Rudge Whitworth

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Goldenrod

I live for the CABE
I think that here is a Rudge river in England. Maybe they dipped the bikes in it before shipping.
 
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GRANDPAS_RIDE

'Lil Knee Scuffer
Well, the C clamp method wasn’t successful. Those pins are really seized. I don’t want to damage the shaft, bearings, or cranks, so resisted the uncontrollable urge to reach for a big hammer.

I noticed on the crank tube that there is what appears to a ball type grease port. I am wondering if I can use that to add fresh grease to the bearings. Does anyone know if this is the intended purpose for this port?

Thanks in advance for any experiences and suggestions.

28D8CEE2-B32F-4C83-B598-A8C70DEE8628.jpeg
 

dnc1

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Well, the C clamp method wasn’t successful. Those pins are really seized. I don’t want to damage the shaft, bearings, or cranks, so resisted the uncontrollable urge to reach for a big hammer.

I noticed on the crank tube that there is what appears to a ball type grease port. I am wondering if I can use that to add fresh grease to the bearings. Does anyone know if this is the intended purpose for this port?

Thanks in advance for any experiences and suggestions.

View attachment 1639940
Yes, but it's for oil and not grease in that instance.
 

bulldog1935

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
For removing the pin, I would try something like Kroil - penetrating oil.
Note it can take time - it can take a lot of time.
It took a lot of time to get where it is now.
I've had frozen (chalk corrosion) aluminum thumbscrews on antique fishing reels let go after 6 months.
 
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bthoff

Look Ma, No Hands!
I'll second the suggestions for penetrating oil and time. I'll usually cinch down the clamp very tight and walk away for a day or two. Often enough when I come back the pin has moved a bit. Once it moves, it's as good as done. When all else fails you can drill the pin out but it's better to use patient persuasion. Or you could end up like me and haul a crank arm to the scrap heap with a drill bit broken off inside a hollowed out, but still stuck, cotter pin.
 

SirMike1983

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Well, the C clamp method wasn’t successful. Those pins are really seized. I don’t want to damage the shaft, bearings, or cranks, so resisted the uncontrollable urge to reach for a big hammer.

I noticed on the crank tube that there is what appears to a ball type grease port. I am wondering if I can use that to add fresh grease to the bearings. Does anyone know if this is the intended purpose for this port?

Thanks in advance for any experiences and suggestions.

View attachment 1639940

The port is for adding oil, which then flows (eventually) down to the bearings. The issue with just adding oil is that after so many years, you don't know the condition of the bearings and bearing surfaces inside the bottom bracket.

With a bike that has been sitting for a long time and the condition of the bearings and races is unknown, it is best to remove the pins and cranks, and to open the bottom bracket it up to see if anything needs to be replaced. The reason for this is that some of the parts wear out faster than others, and if you use the bike with worn parts, it will then cause other parts to begin to fail.
 
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