My 1910 project ( Iver )

Discussion in 'Antique Bicycles Pre-1933' started by filmonger, Apr 1, 2018.

  1. #1 Posted Apr 1, 2018

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    4,840
    Likes Received:
    5,357
    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    IMG_1479.jpg

    My 1910 Iver.... Almost there with making it a rider. Took me quite a while to find the right fork for it. It still needs the badge attached, needs a skip tooth chain, head badge screws, better saddle and a little shim for the left crank arm. Possibly more appropriate rat traps to boot.

    I also have a pair of Iver metal clad that I am in the process of fixing to possibly replace the rider rims with something more period. Though, I kind of like the look of the black rims.

    The Musselman armless on the Iver rims seems to spin backwards over a few rotations before it is engaged. Not sure how to fix this? I'll post a video of it in the next few days.

    Do you guys think I should paint this or leave it as is?.... - most of the paint is gone on the frame. The patina is kind of cool though!

    IMG_1481.jpg
     
    #1 filmonger, Apr 1, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2018
  2. #2 Posted Apr 1, 2018

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,450
    Likes Received:
    4,455
    Location:
    Elysium Fields

    Patina is my favorite even if most of the paint
    is gone from the frame.
    If it was mine, I'd leave it alone and just enjoy
    it as is.
    If painted, even if it's well done, it'll be just
    another nice bike but will never again have
    the originality that it once had.
     
  3. #3 Posted Apr 1, 2018

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    4,840
    Likes Received:
    5,357
    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    Thanks, 2jakes .... Leaning in that direction.
     
    2jakes likes this.
  4. #4 Posted Apr 1, 2018

    I live for the CABE

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,388
    Likes Received:
    3,096
    Location:
    Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK
    A bicycle that looks like it has had a life always looks better to me personally.
    Very nice.
     
    hoofhearted, filmonger, Kato and 2 others like this.
  5. #5 Posted Apr 1, 2018

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    4,658
    Likes Received:
    3,388
    Location:
    Seattle, United States
    Leave it .. it looks nice as it is.
     
    hoofhearted and filmonger like this.
  6. #6 Posted Apr 1, 2018

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

    Joined:
    May 8, 2014
    Messages:
    998
    Likes Received:
    859
    Location:
    Clarksville, TN, United States
    I agree with patina also.
     
    hoofhearted and filmonger like this.
  7. #7 Posted May 10, 2018

    Cruisin' on my Bluebird

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2013
    Messages:
    2,267
    Likes Received:
    892
    Location:
    Kissimmee, FL United States
    Any Updates???
     
  8. #8 Posted May 17, 2018

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    4,840
    Likes Received:
    5,357
    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    Parting it out - in the sale thread. Kelly's sold
     
  9. #9 Posted May 18, 2018 at 3:13 AM

    Saint Lactose The Tolerant

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    3,287
    Likes Received:
    3,572
    Location:
    Fairborn, Ohio

    I totally disagree with that patina ''look''. If you are
    parting-out this machine .. it's not too late to clean-
    up that frame .. wash it with denatured alcohol, rub
    it down with a half of a potato, followed by a decent
    water wash .. then cap it off with the brightest, ''wet-
    look'', fluorescent, metallic,,candy-apple, pearl paint
    available to you.

    An antique racing frame prepared in this manner will
    always command more respect, attention and money
    than one that is in the condition your frame / fork is now.

    Good luck with the sale, Will .....

    ..... patric



    The ''dipped in nail polish'' appearance of the frame
    and fork will always be waaay more impressive than
    just leaving it ''as-is''.
     
    #9 hoofhearted, May 18, 2018 at 3:13 AM
    Last edited: May 18, 2018 at 9:55 AM
    dnc1 likes this.
  10. #10 Posted May 18, 2018 at 8:42 AM

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,450
    Likes Received:
    4,455
    Location:
    Elysium Fields
    :fearscream:.....really?
     
  11. #11 Posted May 18, 2018 at 9:50 AM

    Saint Lactose The Tolerant

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    3,287
    Likes Received:
    3,572
    Location:
    Fairborn, Ohio

    @2jakes
    C'mon, now .. 2jakes ... can't you tell by ALL
    of the technical inclusions I listed in that entry
    that I am being Mr. Smartypants ?!


    Doood ... ya gots t' know I loves patination.

    That new, ''dipped in nail polish'' look initiates
    the Heebie in my Heebie Jeebies ......

    Well ... I guess I can forgive you just this once .........

    ...... patric

    post script ..... after I neutralized any thick and
    active rust on my '17/'18 F-M ... I used the product
    shown in the very last foto. That original paint is
    ''as-found'' ... no other extra paint was added. The
    color of the rust is somewhat controllable. New-
    looking rust is not a desired feature in patination.

    Krylon Matte Finish Spray was used to seal the deal.

    Follow the directions stated on the bottle. Those
    priced vary, but hopefully are current.


    1917  F-M  001.jpg

    1917  F-M  005.jpg


    plum-brown-group.jpg

     
    #11 hoofhearted, May 18, 2018 at 9:50 AM
    Last edited: May 18, 2018 at 3:32 PM
    dnc1 likes this.
  12. #12 Posted May 18, 2018 at 3:54 PM

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,450
    Likes Received:
    4,455
    Location:
    Elysium Fields
    ....me 2....:D
    nabijać-w-butelkę.jpg
     
    dnc1 likes this.
  13. #13 Posted May 18, 2018 at 4:43 PM

    Saint Lactose The Tolerant

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    3,287
    Likes Received:
    3,572
    Location:
    Fairborn, Ohio

    You got me, Big Daddy !!
     
    dnc1 likes this.
  14. #14 Posted May 18, 2018 at 9:48 PM

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,450
    Likes Received:
    4,455
    Location:
    Elysium Fields
    Brush Strokes For A Bonifide Patination :sunglasses:

    In the early days of the automobile, bicycles, master furniture and carriage craftsmen painstakingly applied primitive oil-based enamel or varnish primer and finish coatings along with kerosene by brush!
    These finishes had somewhat poor opacity which required numerous coats for coverage and took weeks to dry.
    They used mainly ink pigments which all tended to be darker colors. These coatings did not withstand weather and sunlight very well and tended to become dry and brittle before long.

    Since those paint jobs didn’t last all that long, in those days, it was common for an owner to get some paint at a hardware store or mail order catalog like Montgomery Ward along with a good horse hair or hog bristle brush and re-paint the car.
    With the idea of preserving the car, some folks even did it every year or so…by brush of course!

    A number of manufacturers including Ford in the Model T line, used a combination of brushing, dipping and even pouring to fully cover and protect the various parts of a car or truck.

    The 1920s saw the beginning of the introduction to spray equipment and nitrocellulose lacquers and primers which were developed together to speed application and dry time to a week or less which cut down dramatically the time required to paint a car although they still required labor intensive and time consuming hand rubbing to achieve a shine.
    This was not especially true in the production of early trucks however, most 1920s to 1960’s trucks were considered to be no-frills pieces of working equipment built to be used and abused, not to be fussed over and pampered.

    A great example of this is with 1930’s Model AA Ford trucks that were built with dull, non-shiny, non-rubbed lacquer finishes.
    Rubbing-out was an extra-cost Ford AA truck option that according to a Ford service letter of May 5,1931; cost $15.00 extra for the cab, cowl and hood while a pickup bed cost $7.00.

    In addition to reduced dry times, nitrocellulose lacquers were more durable and allowed the use of brighter colored although more expensive pigments. Interestingly, although with constant improvements, the organic-based nitrocellulose lacquer was used by some manufacturers well into the later 1950s when it was replaced with the much more durable acrylic lacquers and primers which were synthetics.



    History Timeline and Types of Automotive Paint - Eastwood Garage
     
    #14 2jakes, May 18, 2018 at 9:48 PM
    Last edited: May 19, 2018 at 9:40 AM
    hoofhearted, dnc1 and filmonger like this.
  15. #15 Posted May 20, 2018 at 1:18 PM

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    4,840
    Likes Received:
    5,357
    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    Parting includes rust & patina plus the correct Iver badge .... another mother nature restoration. It takes years for the mother nature restoration service to prepare the patina of this bike.

    .....Usually pronouncing it as pa-TEEN-uh, although PAT-in-a is also correct.

    However you pronounce it, the word is as rich as the objects it describes. A famous New York antiques dealer who lived in the first part of the 20th century said to have used the following analogy to help define "patina" for one of his senior female patrons: "Today you are a lovely woman of 60. However, who you are today is not who you were when you were 20. The difference is patina."
     
    #15 filmonger, May 20, 2018 at 1:18 PM
    Last edited: May 20, 2018 at 1:32 PM
    bikejunk and dnc1 like this.