Overweight middleweights

Discussion in 'Middleweight Bicycles' started by Honestherman, Mar 16, 2015.

  1. #21 Posted Jun 4, 2016

    I live for the CABE

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    Production bikes built now all have robotically laced wheels. They never stay true. Never properly tensioned, and the spokes will loosen up as they seat in and you've got a wobbly wheel.

    Most human-built wheels will stay true for a long time, no matter the spoke guage, as long as they're built right.

    I've built wheels for klunkers that get beat to hell on trails, motorized bikes that get raced on go kart tracks at speeds of 45-50mph, bar-hopping beach cruisers that get seriously mistreated, and the only time they get tweaked is from hitting curbs, rocks, and other immovable objects.

    Even with alloy wheels and 15g spokes.

    Junky rear hubs, and hubs that aren't maintained are a big problem, especially with those that are, uh, on the huskier side.

    Riding style is a major factor, too. If you're a big guy and never get off the seat, you're crushing the bike over potholes, curbs, etc. Gotta learn to unweight yourself and glide.
     
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  2. #22 Posted Jun 4, 2016

    Cruisin' on my Bluebird

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    I have taken bottle brackets apart at 200 more than 250 or even 300. My legs do that.
     
  3. #23 Posted Jun 12, 2016

    Finally riding a big boys bike

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    I'm 240 and never had a problem with any of my old school bikes, I don't have anything newer than 70's and certainly no made in China Walmart crap. I did put a set of heavy gauge spoke wheels off a Schwinn tandem on my Schwinn middleweight panther because it has that "heavy duty" look and ya know, just in case.
     
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  4. #24 Posted Jun 16, 2016

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    Seats & seat clamps. That is the most common weak point I've found on older bikes.

    I routinely ride 70+ year old wheels that have been rebuilt with all original components. I just make sure spokes are tensioned & not bound up and nipples are lubed. I might break a spoke every other year or so.


    New bikes (80's & up) are a completely different story. You get what you pay for!
     
  5. #25 Posted Jul 2, 2016

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    Reminds me of the time I saw a fairly substantial High wheel rider attempt a track stand in front of a large group of oglers. Potato chipped rim, I think is the term! How embarrassing.
     
  6. #26 Posted Jul 2, 2016

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    They make fat bikes! A skinny dude on a fatty looks little......a fat dude on a fatty looks proportionate!
     
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  7. #27 Posted Nov 1, 2016

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    At 5'8" and 175 lbs ergonomics have never been important to me. On every one of my MW's and HW's I run the stem down all the way and get the seat as low as possible. Sometimes I will mount the seat directly to the seat tube and bypass the post. This drops the seat about another 2"....Just a look I like and am comfortable with. When I see a bike with the seat post way up and the bars all high it's like looking at a convertible with the windows up.
     
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  8. #28 Posted Feb 23, 2017

    Finally riding a big boys bike

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    This reminds me of an episode of BikeMan4U where he's railing about the rim on a new "Schwinn" that crapped out. If an American company built something like this, the product liability lawyers would sue them out of business. Do the big box stores just pay settlements as part of their overhead?
     
  9. #29 Posted Feb 23, 2017

    I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!

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    I'm 265 ish, and I know I look preeetty stupid on a regular bike. Sooooo loose weight I hope to do.
     
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  10. #30 Posted Mar 23, 2017

    Look Ma, No Hands!

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    I am 6'1 and was at 230 and found no problem with a repop Phantom or a 1961 middle weight Schwinn Hornet. I also had a Sport Tour and a few others.
     
  11. #31 Posted Mar 24, 2017

    I live for the CABE

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    If you check the advertisements for these bikes, they were marketing them almost exclusively to children. I more than suspect the designers didn't have 200++ pound, stinky, old, bearded bike collectors in mind, either.

    0d2371ae82b3e23b4199ddf45714c4d3.jpg
     
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  12. #32 Posted Mar 29, 2017

    I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!

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    I concur. Bicycling started out as a hobby for wealthy adults, and grew into transportation for kids in the 1940s, just after WWII. It was that way until the mid 1970s, when health and environmental effects began to enter people's minds.

    Yeah, sure, some YOUNG adults bought 3-speed or 5-speed touring bikes, folding bikes, or an occasional cruiser. But most were marketed and bought by kids!
     
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  13. #33 Posted Mar 29, 2017

    I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!

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    I did read a story on here thought, about a 80 year old man who sold his 1959 or 1960 Murray cruiser to a Pawn Shop, and a member here bought the bike and got the story from the pawn shop owner. The original owner would have had to be in his 20s when the bike was new.
     
  14. #34 Posted May 8, 2017

    Finally riding a big boys bike

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    I'm 6' 1" 240 lbs (I know fat) and have never had a problem with any of my bikes. Never broke a spoke. I like the advice earlier about riding style. I think that makes a difference.
     
  15. #35 Posted May 9, 2017

    Finally riding a big boys bike

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  16. #36 Posted Jul 1, 2017

    Look Ma, No Hands!

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    I AM FOR ONE READY TO RIDE ANY SIZED BIKE IF ONLY FOR A TEST RUN...SO IT IS THAT THE RIDER MUST USE COMMON SENSE BEFORE TRYING TO BREAK ANY SIZED BIKE...A CHILD IS SAFE IF HE RIDES CAREFULLY..AN ADULT IS NEVER GOING TO BE SAFE NO MATTER WHAT HIS OR HER WEIGHT IS INVOLVED IF.....THEY ARE NOT CAREFUL WITH THE BIKE AND THE USE IT WAS INTENDED FOR.......BREAKING A BICYCLE IS JUST A CASE OF POOR USE AND JUDGEMENT RATHER THAN CONSTRUCTION OF SAME....BE WISE...CHOOSE CAREFUHLLY BEFORE GOING DOWN THAT HILL OF OVER THAT JUMP THAT JUNIOR BUILT IN THE BACK YARD.....