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Paint Stripper Recommendations Please.

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GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
I recently stripped a frame with auto brake fluid described this link:
Post in thread 'What bike did you work on today?' https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/what-bike-did-you-work-on-today.161390/post-1434659

Also brushed coat of auto brake fluid on house/spray painted steel wheels, paint bubbled peeled off easily.
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Looks like that rim was originally plated. 🤨 At work I soak plated nuts, bolts and washers that were painted, primer underneath, in a jar of xylene for 5 minutes and the paint wrinkles up and falls right off. These were from a factory painted machine where some parts were attached before painting. Removing the paint on the parts and castings that were not plated takes considerably more effort and time.
 

Jeff54

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
No help these days unless U no an old auto shop guy like, in the woods somewhere.
I knew a repair shop guy, in the 60's, he acid dipped my Schwinn frames and never even changed me. Not a spec of paint was left over anywhere.
 

J-wagon

I live for the CABE
Looks like that rim was originally plated. 🤨 At work I soak plated nuts, bolts and washers that were painted, primer underneath, in a jar of xylene for 5 minutes and the paint wrinkles up and falls right off. These were from a factory painted machine where some parts were attached before painting. Removing the paint on the parts and castings that were not plated takes considerably more effort and time.
Yup, I noticed the paint peeled off rims super easy like sunburned peeling skin. The schwinn frame required a plastic scrapper.
 

reverenddrg

Look Ma, No Hands!
I recently stripped a frame with auto brake fluid described this link:
Post in thread 'What bike did you work on today?' https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/what-bike-did-you-work-on-today.161390/post-1434659

Also brushed coat of auto brake fluid on house/spray painted steel wheels, paint bubbled peeled off easily.
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Noice! Forgot about brake fluid, mate had his car doused in it from a angry wife lol strips clean
 

Houndsworth

'Lil Knee Scuffer
In the U.S. that would be DOT 3 or DOT 4 brake fluid. Glycol based. Not DOT 5 silicone, which some car restorers switch to because spills don't affect the high dollar paint jobs.

It could be the paint strippers in California and others that follow CA emissions rules are made with less aromatics. I think CA-compliant spray solvents like brake cleaner, carb cleaner, and maybe spray paints are like that. Not as good.
 

AndyA

Wore out three sets of tires already!
After wasting my time stripping this frame, I had to spend more time getting rid of all the rust. After this experience I have never chemically stripped a frame again.

Dr. Flingdangle:
I have to agree with Professor GTs58. You're going to have to sand or media blast before painting in any case. Stripping is an unnecessary step. I usually wet sand* until I get enough paint and rust off for the paint job I have in mind. You don't need to get all the old paint off if it's sound. You can prime and paint right over it once it's smooth. Have fun!

*wet sanding makes a smoother job and keeps you from breathing paint dust
 

tacochris

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
I have become so proficient at doing this very thing that i have been hired to do it for other people. I have a customer bus lined up this weekend actually....
First example is my bug that came to me in a THICK coat of nasty blue house paint and I was able to remove all of it down to the original 60-only Indigo Blue all by hand in my garage.
The next one is my old 60 walk-thru panel I took from a nasty coat of white down to the original dove blue and was even able to save the logos.

My process is using aeresol aircraft stripper and 4/0 steel wool and a LOT of patience. Its pretty bad stuff so I spray it on a small area, count to about 5 or 10 and start scrubbing and get off as much as possible easily and then immediately dilute it with water (do not force scrub, if it doesnt come off easily, dilute and start over). Its a fairly easy process and works better than any process ive tried and yes Ive tried them all, from citrus strip, to goof off to easy off to graffiti remover and NONE worked as good or as quick as this method.
Ive done multiple bikes as well and will post pictures if need be.

my bug 1.jpg


my bug 2.jpg


my panel.jpg
 

buickmike

I live for the CABE
Today, a other attempt at paint removal.
1731728

Allready familiar with acetone.. Multiple apps on these. Last couple passed the loosened paint was smeared rather than removed.. Underneath of fender shows black- but although some spots on top black had come thru. I can't say it is primer orOG. .Gonna try quick wipes with fingernail polish remover and 2ply napkins. Since remover is colored purple any paint lifted should be seen on napkin. I n theory of course.
 

AndyA

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Allready familiar with acetone.. Multiple apps on these. Last couple passed the loosened paint was smeared rather than removed.
I know what you mean about smearing. When using acetone, I found that I had to attack a small area with the acetone and 4/0 steel then immediately wipe the area with a rag before it dried. If you don't remove the smear before it dries, it will stick again. Have fun!
 
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