Re-cover A Saddle Quick & Cheap.

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49autocycledeluxe

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Another great saddle job, Balloonoob!

how's that chair working out for you? got to watch out for chairs ion the side of the road. saw a cool chair along the road out by my work that is at the end of the road so people dump stuff there... saw a dead calf once... saw a chair, thought I should go look but didn't. later it was gone, then I saw on online, it was an Eames (?) chair worth some money even on poor condition.
 

Balloonoob

I live for the CABE
So my second attempt at a "real" saddle recover. I sacrificed a brand new modern seat that I found on clearance at Walmart for a dollar just for the padding. Glad I did. This thing is going to be really comfy. The last one i did (see post 46 above) was much flatter with far less curves and it had a pinch pan. Did not turn out comfortable at all. Perhaps on this new one I did had i started from the middle it may have had less creases but I started on the back as i had to cut slits to accommodate the Troxel tag. I'm happy enough with it as I'm sure it will be comfortable for riding.

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the tinker

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
First off. Don't be tempted to cover over the old pad. Any imperfections will show. Always work with the seat pan facing up. Start with firmly molding your material on the top, pushing straight down to the side, not pulling off to an angle. Starting out by pulling your material to an angle causes wrinkles that will be impossible to get out later. Once you have the top started off correctly, trim to size and make slits about every inch or so. Leave ample material, so you don't come up short, but only enough to lap about an inch over the bottom of the pan. You can't pull it tight if you leave too much material. When pulling your tabs, do it with the seat pan facing up, don't turn it upside down to do it. That way you can see what is happening on the top of your saddle. No one cares what the bottom looks like. Always firmly pull your tabs straight down. Go off to one side or the other, even slightly, and it will cause a wrinkle. Make sure it's perfect before you fold under. The tabs have to be pulled
1276660


really tight. From start to finish will take less than a half hour. That includes putting the padding on.
1276664


1276669

The black seats are from an old worn out leather couch. The white one is new material.
 

Balloonoob

I live for the CABE
First off. Don't be tempted to cover over the old pad. Any imperfections will show. Always work with the seat pan facing up. Start with firmly molding your material on the top, pushing straight down to the side, not pulling off to an angle. Starting out by pulling your material to an angle causes wrinkles that will be impossible to get out later. Once you have the top started off correctly, trim to size and make slits about every inch or so. Leave ample material, so you don't come up short, but only enough to lap about an inch over the bottom of the pan. You can't pull it tight if you leave too much material. When pulling your tabs, do it with the seat pan facing up, don't turn it upside down to do it. That way you can see what is happening on the top of your saddle. No one cares what the bottom looks like. Always firmly pull your tabs straight down. Go off to one side or the other, even slightly, and it will cause a wrinkle. Make sure it's perfect before you fold under. The tabs have to be pulledView attachment 1276660

really tight. From start to finish will take less than a half hour. That includes putting the padding on.View attachment 1276664

View attachment 1276669
The black seats are from an old worn out leather couch. The white one is new material.
Thanks man. Wah wah wah wah.... Maybe I'll redo this one later.
 
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westwildcats

'Lil Knee Scuffer
Thought provoking thread. My question is on leather thickness. I plan on going to Tandy and purchasing new. Any advice on what ounce leather I should be looking for? Thinner leather will conform more easily and cost less, thicker should be more sturdy? 5-6 oz? 6-7 oz? A voice of experience would be most welcome.
 

the tinker

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Thin chrome tan leather, used for upholstery. Hobby lobby sells it. Veg tan is too heavy. Veg tan is thick, can be moistened and formed. It's used on horse saddles. Best bet, carry a razor blade in your car. I just scored enough dynamite red/brown leather to do a dozen saddles off an old couch. Done many, many saddles and have never bought any leather.
 

STRADALITE

I live for the CABE
The question is do you want to do your seat cheap or do it right. The problem with using an old jacket or couch is it’s the wrong type of leather.
Veg tan is the only way to go. I’ve done hundreds of seats so I have some first hand knowledge.
I use 3oz and I wet form it. It’s the only way to get all the wrinkles out.
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