Rear hub disassembly??

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guzziworksman

Finally riding a big boys bike
I need to remove the guts of this rear hub in order to respoke the wheel. How, is the question? It doesn't seem to disassemble - at least, in terms of getting this cog off, by working from the nondrive side. If so - how/what removes, here? I can get the bearing cone off, no problem. Does the inner "ring" remove next - either using a special tool/or my old standby, a punch and a light hammer - by tapping in a ccw direction? So far - it won't budge. OR - by applying the same thinking to the outermost "ring"? Same deal - it won't budge, either. I'm asking before I break out the 3-lb. hammer and doing something I'll always regret. Thanks. BTW - this is a non-geared, no-coaster-brake, freewheeling hub.
1391776
 

rustjunkie

. . . . . . .
Moderator
didn't we solve this problem already?

you need a freewheel tool and a vise.
don't use a punch and hammer

 

guzziworksman

Finally riding a big boys bike
didn't we solve this problem already?

you need a freewheel tool and a vise.
don't use a punch and hammer

No...we didn't solve this specific hub...this is a new one. I never did get the hub all the way off on the Japanese bike. What I discovered - on that one - was that the hub didn't need to be removed to get at the spokes. The flange was slotted so the spokes could be worked on with the hub intact. That was a different case of my ineptitude. I have a tool that'll grip on either one of the places on this hub. Just need to know which one. I'll bet it's the inner one, first. But it might pay me to get up off my lazy butt and review my other request. Thanky.
 

SKPC

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Tough job removing these. When it fails, you have to remove it anyway...or get a new wheel? Yes, these dumb freewheels get very tight over time. I recently had a fight with a badly stuck freewheel that ended up breaking my bench vise as I torqued on it! I think a modified tool like what you propose would work. Grind off two of the tabs and file the other two to fit. And perhaps most important in this endeavor, HEAT!!! Lots of gas torch heat on the freewheel (inside and out) as there should be no plastic or rubber material in it. This will, through simple physics, expand the metal of the threaded freewheel assembly, forcing the tight metal threads to loosen up just enough to let go.
 

guzziworksman

Finally riding a big boys bike
Tough job removing these. When it fails, you have to remove it anyway...or get a new wheel? Yes, these dumb freewheels get very tight over time. I recently had a fight with a badly stuck freewheel that ended up breaking my bench vise as I torqued on it! I think a modified tool like what you propose would work. Grind off two of the tabs and file the other two to fit. And perhaps most important in this endeavor, HEAT!!! Lots of gas torch heat on the freewheel (inside and out) as there should be no plastic or rubber material in it. This will, through simple physics, expand the metal of the threaded freewheel assembly, forcing the tight metal threads to loosen up just enough to let go.
You broke a vise. VERY impressed.
 

rustjunkie

. . . . . . .
Moderator
a tight fit between the tool and the notches is important.
Thread the axle nut on to hold the tool in place, but don't leave play between the tool and the axle nut.
This type of 2-notch freeweel isn't the greatest design (to say the very least) so the nut needs to be tight against the tool so just a tiny bit of "unscrew" of the freewheel is possible.
Break it loose just enough, then you can loosen the axle nut a bit and proceed.
Leave the tool just a bit too loose and it'll make a mess of the notches then you're worse off than before.
 
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