Replacing Speedometer Lens

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partsguy

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Aug 13, 2008
10,810
The Land of Oz
Good day and Happy New Year,

How would I go about taking apart this speedometer? I need replace the lens and probably clean / re-lube all the internal parts. the face and cosmetics need cleaned too. This is the original speedometer from my bike and I really want to make this beautiful again, AND functional.

The way I see it I have to remove the jam nuts on the back, and some how remove the chrome trim ring that is pressed on. How do I remove it without destroying it or damaging the speedometer further?

speedometer.jpg
 
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T.J. Higgins

Look Ma, No Hands!
Apr 16, 2014
79
Rochester NY
To remove the bezel, lube up with pb blaster where bezel meets speedometer can, Let it soak for a while before you flip it over. loosely install a piston ring compressor (pictured) so it slides over can and stops at bezel. Slam speedometer and compressor on work bench (multiple times) can slides down inside compressor hitting bezel off.

1578154161438.png
 

partsguy

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Aug 13, 2008
10,810
The Land of Oz
To remove the bezel, lube up with pb blaster where bezel meets speedometer can, Let it soak for a while before you flip it over. loosely install a piston ring compressor (pictured) so it slides over can and stops at bezel. Slam speedometer and compressor on work bench (multiple times) can slides down inside compressor hitting bezel off.

1578154161438.png
I have nerve damage in my hand from using one of those 11 years ago. I’ll wear gloves this time!
 

Andrew Gorman

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 15, 2008
2,942
Pasadena (Hastings Ranch), United States
Work gloves are good. Take some time and find some that actually fit and keep them handy, rather than just grabbing a pair of White Mules. Not cheap, but a worthwhile investment.
 

partsguy

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Aug 13, 2008
10,810
The Land of Oz
Work gloves are good. Take some time and find some that actually fit and keep them handy, rather than just grabbing a pair of White Mules. Not cheap, but a worthwhile investment.
I have a pair, but not at trade school. We weren’t given any.
 

Andrew Gorman

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 15, 2008
2,942
Pasadena (Hastings Ranch), United States
For a safety geek, that is a problem. Gloves really do cut down on scrapes, cuts and light contusions, but like all safety gear they only work when you are wearing them. And people hate wearing gloves that don't fit. And even though employers are obligated to provide safety equipment for their employees under OSHA, they usually cheap out and buy adequate- not good-gloves that usually don't fit. I worked as a subcontractor in a chemical plant that would routinely send people home for a week for a safety violation, and one of the most common was not wearing the crappy gloves they provided. Faced with a week without pay, they STILL wouldn't wear their gloves. It takes a lot of time to find a pair that fits and protects you from the hazards you face, but get them and give the boss the bill. Point out that a pair of gloves is a lot cheaper than a lost time injury. More than 30 years ago I did archaeology field work and ran through a couple of pairs of XL and XXL of White Mules provided by the lab every week. Everyone hated them. Too big, fingers too long or short, palms too loose or tight etc. Then an outlet mall with a Black and Decker store opened up on the interstate outside of town and word spread they had leather work gloves in Women's and Children's sizes! It was an obligatory stop on the way to the field after that.
 
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Nashman

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Oct 2, 2016
2,587
62
Winnipeg, Canada
I made one up with tin from a furnace manufact. plant. I had them roll the tin based on the speedo diameter/some overlap, then duct taped it to exact size. Worked well, just be cautious as the where you hammer it, best on wood, ( with gloves on/maybe protect your eyes too? I used to sell Indust. safety equipment, rarely used it duh?) Got this idea from the Cabe a few years back. It works!!
 
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Sevenhills1952

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Dec 20, 2018
593
68
US
Yes a little PB Blaster or Aerokroil is good, laid face down so it can soak in. The few I've taken apart I have used a piece of hardwood like oak, about 1"x1"x6" (A helper is good) hold it while wood against ridge and lightly rap with small hammer going all around. It may move just a tiny bit and takes a while. It's tough of course because you don't want to bend or knock any chrome off. Wood held on grain side, ground on grinding wheel "U" shape slightly so it conforms to round shape is better.

Sent from my SM-S320VL using Tapatalk
 
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partsguy

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Aug 13, 2008
10,810
The Land of Oz
Thank you everyone! I’ll work on it tonight or Saturday
 
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