Resilion brake cable clone

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Alan Brase

Finally riding a big boys bike
Just a note on the age.
If that Cyclo is original, The back of the derailleur arm will have a number at the top. That is the manufacturing date of the derailleur. Im pretty sure the "C" cutout chrome derailleur bracket is post war but check the date.

Im getting ready to re-sheath a set of old WW2 era cables to replace the cloth/lacquer original sheathing.
One question I ask of your job is how the cable end nibs were removed and re-attached?
Are they simply soldered together?
Fabulous work by-the way
I think I remember in some old motorcycle factory manual (likely Triumph) it showed silver soldering them.
 

Schwinny

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Good. I'll work up my nerve to get that done.
I want to re-sheath my Cyclo cable, ratted up lacquer/cloth sheathing.
I've got two sizes of sheathing and the smallest (1/8") would be best but the cable end will have to come off to use it. I've already re-done some brake cables with 1/4" but it is a bit of a loose fit. It also enlarges over the end of the cable with no disassembly required, whereas the 1/8" won't open that wide.
 

Bazil4696

Look Ma, No Hands!
When I decided to tackle this project, I chose the route of "All New" modern components.
Because finding the original style sheathing was not panning out.
So, I chose silver Jagwire housing with a slippery lining, and polished stainless cables. I had to modify the ends to fit the resilion brake levers, as the original cables have a slightly different shape.
If I had to remove the ends, I would fabricate new blanks from brass and silver solder them to the cable ends.
I believe the ends are just solder, formed in some mould, like pouring bullets, and heating them to remove them would result in a blob of solder on the floor.
I haven't tackled the cyclo cable yet, but purchased all components to attempt this soon. I'm unsure how the cables run through the shifter and what drives the cables and locates them to the shifter.
I'm also not 100% on the method of attachment at the derailleur for BOTH cables
 

Schwinny

Wore out three sets of tires already!
When I decided to tackle this project, I chose the route of "All New" modern components.
Because finding the original style sheathing was not panning out.
So, I chose silver Jagwire housing with a slippery lining, and polished stainless cables. I had to modify the ends to fit the resilion brake levers, as the original cables have a slightly different shape.
If I had to remove the ends, I would fabricate new blanks from brass and silver solder them to the cable ends.
I believe the ends are just solder, formed in some mould, like pouring bullets, and heating them to remove them would result in a blob of solder on the floor.
I haven't tackled the cyclo cable yet, but purchased all components to attempt this soon. I'm unsure how the cables run through the shifter and what drives the cables and locates them to the shifter.
I'm also not 100% on the method of attachment at the derailleur for BOTH cables
Well if you can make up all the parts needed as you've done with the brakes, you shouldn't have any problem with the Cyclo cable.
It is one cable with a shifter nib soldered to the middle of the length. Sheathing on either side of that nib and then the other end(s) are soldered together to another nib The nibs fit into recess' in the shifter barrel groove on one end, and the the barrel wheel that is on the derailleur shaft. It creates a push/pull movement. All the derailleur movement comes from inside the derailleur arm mount where there is a helical roller channel that slides the arm back and forth across the shaft as the cable is pulled about 60 degrees either way.
My version uses the shifter tension as the only means to fix the derailleur placement. The next version had a flat helical coil spring along the derailleur shaft that helped keep tension in one direction and the shifter held that spring tension.
My set-up is curious to me in that the shifter had no means of tightening or adjusting the tension at all. Other similar shifter versions Ive seen have a tightening screw in the center but mine was a brass rivet. When I re-did the shifter, I replaced the rivet with a brass post that works to adjust tension. I did have to make a bushing to make the post work, but it now looks and works like it was made that way.
Notice the stamping on the derailleur arm, that number at top is the year of manufacture.
If you haven't settled on a year of manufacture, yours could date your machine.

1560304


1560305


cyclo-1s.jpg
 

Bazil4696

Look Ma, No Hands!
Well if you can make up all the parts needed as you've done with the brakes, you shouldn't have any problem with the Cyclo cable.
It is one cable with a shifter nib soldered to the middle of the length. Sheathing on either side of that nib and then the other end(s) are soldered together to another nib The nibs fit into recess' in the shifter barrel groove on one end, and the the barrel wheel that is on the derailleur shaft. It creates a push/pull movement. All the derailleur movement comes from inside the derailleur arm mount where there is a helical roller channel that slides the arm back and forth across the shaft as the cable is pulled about 60 degrees either way.
My version uses the shifter tension as the only means to fix the derailleur placement. The next version had a flat helical coil spring along the derailleur shaft that helped keep tension in one direction and the shifter held that spring tension.
My set-up is curious to me in that the shifter had no means of tightening or adjusting the tension at all. Other similar shifter versions Ive seen have a tightening screw in the center but mine was a brass rivet. When I re-did the shifter, I replaced the rivet with a brass post that works to adjust tension. I did have to make a bushing to make the post work, but it now looks and works like it was made that way.
Notice the stamping on the derailleur arm, that number at top is the year of manufacture.
If you haven't settled on a year of manufacture, yours could date your machine.

View attachment 1560304

View attachment 1560305

View attachment 1560307
Thank you for that detailed description!
Because the shifter actually still works freely, I've been reluctant to replace it.
I do have two tandem length cables, cause I wasn't sure how the cable was assembled.
I thought I might need to splice them at the shifter.
But I have a better grasp of how it functions now! I'm sure this project will eventually get all new cables, while saving the original ones as sample models.
We intend to ride old Claud when the weather breaks here in Canada.
If I don't have enough gear range, I have a N.O.S. Sturmey Archer 3 speed AM (hub brake model) 40 hole hub that came with a N.O.S. three speed sprocket that I would build to have a hybrid 9 speed.
All I need is the Dunlop 26 x 1 1/4" 40 hole rim and a handful of spokes.....
 

Bazil4696

Look Ma, No Hands!
So, after countless hours researching and fabricating components in the shop, many dollars purchasing parts, not including international shipping and four pages of discussion here, I FOUND MY UNICORN!
1565164

Of course I bought it.
Turns out this looks like the elusive "Ladyback" length, which happens to be longer than the gents/gents version, of which seems common compared to how many ladyback Clauds were built. With Resilion brakes as the option...
Now to find the front one....YEESH.
Welcome to old bikes.
 
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