Schwinn Lightweight Forks

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Schwinny

Finally riding a big boys bike
I have never see a Tange fork on a Paramount, unless you mean the Later "Series" Asian built versions.
It was a year ago I went to a bike get-together here in town and there was a late 70's Paramount there for sale. I looked it over pretty good and I thought the fork looked like the Tange one above.
Of course that's what the thread here is about. That could have been a replacement or I could have been mistaken.
Personally I dont need a bike that finely crafted. But I will juggle those parts when they come up.
What about those 76-78 last generation Filet brazed models? I Think the Sierra and Superior and Sport Limited were using the Tange. MMMmmmmm.... sport limited.....
And the Super Sports. But was the Suburban using a Tange?
What forks were used over time since Schwinn stopped making their own?
 

Eric Amlie

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Interesting thread, and something I've never looked into.
Looking forward to more responses and learning more about this.
 

Lightweightbikes

Look Ma, No Hands!
Ive been playing musical forks lately. I didn't realize how many Schwinn Lightweight forks I had until I started looking for a particular one. When I had 8 lying out I realized I didn't have the one I was looking for anymore and I started looking at the others. Then I remembered a pic I found long ago of a page in a Schwinn book that showed their TOTL forks for that period but there are many more.
Has anyone started a comprehensive Schwinn fork thread?
I think I know what bikes the ones I have came off of, all but one. I'd like to know what bike it came off of also but its an oldie.
From what Ive seen The Ashtabula forks came in two blade shapes and two lengths for 26" and 27" bikes starting in 56'? I dont know.
Maybe folks could dig out forks and take pics of forks on bikes till we have a comprehensive pictorial of Schwinn forks. (26"-27"-28")
Was there a special fork for larger wheel track racers?
When did they start using French and Japanese forks? others?
Heres the pic of a Schwinn Parts books showing four types of early forks. I have two early ones and neither are one of these.

View attachment 1401270

As far as early forks go, I have locking fork I thought was from the early 50's but now Ive seen a 54' traveler that has a locking fork that is different from mine. On mine the caliper pivot bolt is a stud screwed into the fork. The hole doesn't go through because the lock is in the way. On this 54', the pivot bolt goes through and the fender is hanging on it but it still has a lock. I'd like to see that one close up. This 54' also has the early Weinmann alum. Calipers.
View attachment 1401280

View attachment 1401281

Heres mine with no hole in the rear. Also came with the metal Schwinn Caliper.
I will take more pics and post them.

View attachment 1401282
Very interesting I have a 54 continental I'm looking a few parts I have one pedal that I need the right-side shaft only that side but if I can get the pair even better
1404095

Let me know if you have parts for this pedal and the caliper brakes for the same year schwinn stamp
 

SirMike1983

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Trying to pin down all the variations would be difficult. A pre-war New World might have a tubular fork that had a flat-ish plain shoulders at the crown. They have a kind of primitive look to them. The post-war New World often will have the torpedo shoulder fork in plain steel with no tabs drawing in shape on the design of the older Superior fork. But then some New Worlds show up with actual torpedo shoulder Superior forks as an upgrade. The Continental borrows the design in its own scheme and material. The post-war Superior, used the torpedo shoulder as well. Finally, the basic base level bikes converted to the flat Ashtabula fork.

And then the forks seem to behave differently when subjected to damage/abuse. The torpedo shoulder ones love to bend down about halfway along each blade, and sometimes they'll twist along the vertical axis if they suffer damage. The pre-war plain shoulder forks love to bend up high near the shoulders if they get a front end hit. The Ashtabula forks have more lateral flex compared to a conventional fork. Within reason, you can fix them using the fork jig and the frame/fork arm. The tubular types are preferable over the Ashtabula because of the side-to-side flex with the Ashtabula.

The torpedo shoulder forks are very attractive and streamlined, but also somewhat fragile and spindly compared to something like a Raleigh or Rudge English fork.
 

Schwinny

Finally riding a big boys bike
Very interesting I have a 54 continental I'm looking a few parts I have one pedal that I need the right-side shaft only that side but if I can get the pair even betterView attachment 1404095
Let me know if you have parts for this pedal and the caliper brakes for the same year schwinn stamp
Ive seen those before but I don't have any parts for them. But I really want a pair of those.
Thanks for putting that bug in my bonnet.... Ugh.
Now that they are in the bank, they'll turn up eventually.
If I get more than I need, I'll contact you.
 

Lightweightbikes

Look Ma, No Hands!
Ive seen those before but I don't have any parts for them. But I really want a pair of those.
Thanks for putting that bug in my bonnet.... Ugh.
Now that they are in the bank, they'll turn up eventually.
If I get more than I need, I'll contact you.
Okay let me know well I need the 1950 calllipers to finish my project it was another pair of those pedals on ebay the other day but a little differentsame style shaft but those no butterfly look more European schwinn style for the 50's but they were sold for 480.00 I do not know how those reach that price I never seen those before... ...

20210408_190655.jpg
 

SirMike1983

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Those lightweight pedals are really nice, but they're hard to find in complete and good condition today. The guys who have the old Continentals, Superiors, Paramounts, etc. tend to like and collect those pedals and pay the big bucks for them. On my 1947 Continental, I just used Torrington #10 pedals. I eventually sold it back to the prior owner. On my 1947 New World, I have the Schwinn label copy of the #10.
 

Lightweightbikes

Look Ma, No Hands!
I need the 1950 caliper brakes good condition Ive seen those before but I don't have any parts for them. But I really want a pair of those.
Thanks for putting that bug in my bonnet.... Ugh.
Now that they are in the bank, they'll turn up eventually.
If I get more than I need, I'll contact you.
Okay let me know well I need the 1950 calllipers to finish my project it was another pair of those pedals on ebay the other day but a little differentsame style shaft but those no butterfly look more European schwinn style for the 50's but they were sold for 480.00 I do not know how those reach that price I never seen those before ...
Trying to pin down all the variations would be difficult. A pre-war New World might have a tubular fork that had a flat-ish plain shoulders at the crown. They have a kind of primitive look to them. The post-war New World often will have the torpedo shoulder fork in plain steel with no tabs drawing in shape on the design of the older Superior fork. But then some New Worlds show up with actual torpedo shoulder Superior forks as an upgrade. The Continental borrows the design in its own scheme and material. The post-war Superior, used the torpedo shoulder as well. Finally, the basic base level bikes converted to the flat Ashtabula fork.

And then the forks seem to behave differently when subjected to damage/abuse. The torpedo shoulder ones love to bend down about halfway along each blade, and sometimes they'll twist along the vertical axis if they suffer damage. The pre-war plain shoulder forks love to bend up high near the shoulders if they get a front end hit. The Ashtabula forks have more lateral flex compared to a conventional fork. Within reason, you can fix them using the fork jig and the frame/fork arm. The tubular types are preferable over the Ashtabula because of the side-to-side flex with the Ashtabula.

The torpedo shoulder forks are very attractive and streamlined, but also somewhat fragile and spindly compared to something like a Raleigh or Rudge English fork.
The fork on the schwinn wor
Trying to pin down all the variations would be difficult. A pre-war New World might have a tubular fork that had a flat-ish plain shoulders at the crown. They have a kind of primitive look to them. The post-war New World often will have the torpedo shoulder fork in plain steel with no tabs drawing in shape on the design of the older Superior fork. But then some New Worlds show up with actual torpedo shoulder Superior forks as an upgrade. The Continental borrows the design in its own scheme and material. The post-war Superior, used the torpedo shoulder as well. Finally, the basic base level bikes converted to the flat Ashtabula fork.

And then the forks seem to behave differently when subjected to damage/abuse. The torpedo shoulder ones love to bend down about halfway along each blade, and sometimes they'll twist along the vertical axis if they suffer damage. The pre-war plain shoulder forks love to bend up high near the shoulders if they get a front end hit. The Ashtabula forks have more lateral flex compared to a conventional fork. Within reason, you can fix them using the fork jig and the frame/fork arm. The tubular types are preferable over the Ashtabula because of the side-to-side flex with the Ashtabula.

The torpedo shoulder forks are very attractive and streamlined, but also somewhat fragile and spindly compared to something like a Raleigh or Rudge English fork.
Hi the schwinn world the fork is a little different to the continental and superior touring bikes ones of the main changes is the front caliper with locking fork and with out locking also can be replace by a front drumbrake or the brakes they are adjust to the each leg of the fork
 

Lightweightbikes

Look Ma, No Hands!
Very interesting I have a 54 continental I'm looking a few parts I have one pedal that I need the right-side shaft only that side but if I can get the pair even betterView attachment 1404095
Let me know if you have parts for this pedal and the caliper brakes for the same year schwinn stamp

Very interesting I have a 54 continental I'm looking a few parts I have one pedal that I need the right-side shaft only that side but if I can get the pair even betterView attachment 1404095
Let me know if you have parts for this pedal and the caliper brakes for the same year schwinn stamp

20210507_181951.jpg


20210507_181915.jpg


20210507_181951.jpg
 
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