Schwinn Lightweight LOCKING Forks

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Schwinny

Wore out three sets of tires already!
I've had this old front fender for many years. I've saved it for a specter of an idea that one day I would have The Continental, Superior or Paramount that would need this.
I got tired of looking at it once and tried to sell it off but there were no takers because of the crimps at the forks. I asked around extensively and most said it wasn't a Schwinn fender. It's is true that Many companies put this type on their bikes in the early days. I guess it kind of signified a higher end bike or whatever.
It is the exact diameter without question for a 27" tire. It looks too big for a 26" from all angles. I even mounted it on a Racer once to check it out before the hangar was removed. The crimps are a factory roll job. Not a pliers crimp job.
Notice the brace attachment style (one hole) and the original paint (blue) underneath the drab green it had been painted. Its a 40's-50's Schwinn Blue (the pic doesn't do it justice). I've put it up next to a bike of the same color and they match perfectly. It is a very pretty electric blue.
But with nobody to validate it as a Schwinn, It went into the rafters.

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Then, I found this fork that was another piece I couldn't resist and after studying it from all angles, I realized it was not just different because it is the locking style, it is very different.
From the crown bottom to the axle centerline is 14.5", THAT is a 27" fork measurement. The brake caliper is on a stud, there is no caliper bolt going through to hold the fender. Meaning of course it takes a special fender also. Things evolve and I thought of selling the fork. The fender and the fork ended up within a few feet of each other and it hit me, they match up. They fit perfectly together with the hangar in place being held tight by the caliper stud in front. The crimps line up exactly with the caliper arms.

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So if anyone knows more, or is intrigued past..... meh.
Does anyone here own a Schwinn Lightweight with this locking fork and fender?
What could they have come on?

Thanks for the lock work Wes.
And guess what? I just found a Conti frame this set may end up on.
Anybody?
 

Schwinny

Wore out three sets of tires already!
I just saw @HARPO 's Conti he posted not long ago and it looks to have the same fork but there was a question about the fenders....
Did that ever wring out?
 

HARPO

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
That's a project that's been sitting since I posted it. To many other bikes have gotten in the way to work on it. Hopefully one day soon!!! 😩 But it turned out the fenders on that one were newer (see original Post).
 

GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
I've never owned a Town & Country Tandem, is there a chance that fender could have been is used on those? I know most had the front expander brake in the earlier productions but I've seen some 50's with calipers.
 

ccdc.1

Look Ma, No Hands!
Interesting fork and fender. The fork ends look to be the crimped variety (not brazed in) so not a Paramount/Superior(early ones)/Continental fork. The long indents on the inside of the fork legs are unusual to me. As to the 27" sizing, I don't have much experience with the 1950s Varsity/World/Traveler lightweight ranges..did any come with 27" wheels?
 

SirMike1983

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
I thought of the tandem when I saw that fender as well. The Town & Country used a fender shape similar to the Continental.

With the long notch fork, I believe those are slightly later than short notch 1940s type version. I've had a couple of each and the short notches came on my 1946-47 New Worlds, while the long notch ones were on a couple mid-1950s era three speeds I had. I don't know when exactly they changed the fork though.
 

Schwinny

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Looking at dozens of pictures, it looks like all of them have a lot of space between the top of the tire and the crown so maybe the length is standard.
I just sold a 40's brazed pocket tip version (not locking) that I was told was a Superior fork and the two have the same legs metal construction. Not lightweight by any standard, but that's where it ends, the rest was very different from the rake to the stiffening crimps

I think the tandem or maybe trike sounds interesting for the fender. Even though it fits like a glove, the caliper doesnt even come close to needing the fender crimps. You can almost squeeze them completely together before the arms touch the fender.
This fork was originally Black with handprinted Chevrons w/red edges. The paint was pretty bad and it looked like it had been buried for awhile.
Side note being that the metal surface of the fork is VERY rough. They used a lot of primer to fill in the chatter marks from grinding and smoothing the welds, etc.

Well in the end, I'll put these two together, or at least keep them together.
Seeing that the fender is obviously a rarity of some sort. It will be available in the future for anyone that actually needs it for its original use.
 

Vicious Cycle

Finally riding a big boys bike
I have a very early ("A" prefix) Superior that has that fender, in Burgandy, I think thats what it came on, The early Varsity's that I have seen , and the one I own, has a peaked front fender.
 
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