Seat clamp set screw-Rambler? 1899

Most Recent BUY IT NOW Items Listed on eBay
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
These ads go away when you register for an account!

mrkmcdonnell

Finally riding a big boys bike
Apr 3, 2013
265
New Jersey, United States
Looking for one seat clamp set screw. This came off a Ladies 1899 Rambler although it possibly could be found elsewhere. The best I can determine it is 5/16" nominal diameter and 22 TPI but can't swear it's 5/16-22 BSF if you know what I mean. It came off a Rambler so who the hell knows for sure? The hex head is 5/16" and thread length is appx 5/8"

I know this chicken scratch ain't worth your time so if you have one, charge accordingly or I have some interesting TOC smalls to offer in trades well.
20190124_160654.jpg


20181218_212501.jpg


20181218_212422.jpg
 

Andrew Gorman

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 15, 2008
2,889
Pasadena (Hastings Ranch), United States
the 1890s were a wacky period. MAYBE it is a British Standard Cycle thread, but that did not use 22TPI. Check it over with every thread pitch gauge you can borrow. Maybe it is just worn, or maybe it is some Rambler specific thread. Slap a hand lens on the bold to see what the thread profile looks like. As a last resort, or to just get the bike on the road there are always helicoils or you could re-tap.
 

mrkmcdonnell

Finally riding a big boys bike
Apr 3, 2013
265
New Jersey, United States
the 1890s were a wacky period. MAYBE it is a British Standard Cycle thread, but that did not use 22TPI. Check it over with every thread pitch gauge you can borrow. Maybe it is just worn, or maybe it is some Rambler specific thread. Slap a hand lens on the bold to see what the thread profile looks like. As a last resort, or to just get the bike on the road there are always helicoils or you could re-tap.
Ramblers in particular I'm finding seem to have a prioritized thread. Best I can determine is all their threads are an oversized British standard but can't swear to it. I have gauges and it seems to match up to 22 tpi... I think.

Sure would hate to alter it but the thought has occurred to me.

Thanks for your input.
 

Andrew Gorman

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 15, 2008
2,889
Pasadena (Hastings Ranch), United States
True enough... Maybe try to find a retired Machinist/Tool and Die Maker who knows how to measure oddball threads and identify them. If you have a railroad museum or an historic ship museum near you, that's where you can find them. Try posting at
https://www.hobby-machinist.com/forums/
You need to find someone who knows how to use thread wires to pin this bolt down
 

mrkmcdonnell

Finally riding a big boys bike
Apr 3, 2013
265
New Jersey, United States
True enough... Maybe try to find a retired Machinist/Tool and Die Maker who knows how to measure oddball threads and identify them. If you have a railroad museum or an historic ship museum near you, that's where you can find them. Try posting at
https://www.hobby-machinist.com/forums/
You need to find someone who knows how to use thread wires to pin this bolt down
I'm not a machinist, but even if the threads are identified correctly a die must be available to cut the threads, no? Can they be cut any other way?

I'm certain the threads are nothing currently in use and I assume the likelihood of finding a die, whatever GJ used is impossible.

That's an interesting website. Thanks for the tip.
 
This ad goes away when you register for an account!

Andrew Gorman

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 15, 2008
2,889
Pasadena (Hastings Ranch), United States
Internal and external threads can be cut to any size or pitch on a lathe, if the operator knows what they are doing. With almost all machine work being done CNC these skills are not commercial, but are mostly in the hobbyist and old guys spheres. It's a cool old bike and an interesting problem. I'm sure you can find some help.
 

mrkmcdonnell

Finally riding a big boys bike
Apr 3, 2013
265
New Jersey, United States
Internal and external threads can be cut to any size or pitch on a lathe, if the operator knows what they are doing. With almost all machine work being done CNC these skills are not commercial, but are mostly in the hobbyist and old guys spheres. It's a cool old bike and an interesting problem. I'm sure you can find some help.
 

FSH

Finally riding a big boys bike
Aug 27, 2018
260
Corona
I'm not a machinist, but even if the threads are identified correctly a die must be available to cut the threads, no? Can they be cut any other way?

I'm certain the threads are nothing currently in use and I assume the likelihood of finding a die, whatever GJ used is impossible.

That's an interesting website. Thanks for the tip.
I can make one. I just need the original...
 
This ad goes away when you register for an account!