Sturmey Archer Tricoaster

Discussion in 'Antique Bicycles Pre-1933' started by fordsnake, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. #21 Posted Dec 20, 2017

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    This is how the puzzle comes together...one piece at a time! It may take a while to collect all the pieces…but with the help of others the evidence will eventually prevail!
    We can narrow down the origins of your hub by a few known facts; the English & US versions of the The Tricoaster were identical, except for two distinct differences.

    1) On the English version, the word NOTTINGHAM was stamped under the word (patented) .
    Sturmey Tricoaster Illus.jpg


    2): Early English hubs were typically 40 holes. The below diagram of the Tricoaster produced in 1914 at the Sturmey-Archer Gears LTD plant in England illustrates 40 holes. The 36 holes version was first introduced for SA on the Tricoaster 1914 version (US made). It wasn't until after WW1, did Sturmey Archer offer a hub with an option of 36 or 40 holes.
    Sturmey Diagram .jpg
    The above diagram found on the SA’s website, contradicts information posted also on the SA site http://www.sturmey-archerheritage.com/images/photos/pic-493.4.jpg this statement suggests there was a TYPE "F". As I've mentioned (see post #3 of this thread), I can not find evidence of a TYPE 'F' Tricoaster. I believe it was a typo and the author was referencing the TYPE ‘FN’ Tricoaster (as seen in the diagram) It's identical to the US version and also produced in 1914.
     
    #21 fordsnake, Dec 20, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2017
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  2. #22 Posted Dec 20, 2017

    Finally riding a big boys bike

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    Hi Fordsnake,

    a few more parts to the puzzle (but no solution yet)!

    From a CABE members site (below, midway down the page) there is a discussion of early S-A hub markings in the UK. It does mention F as bieing used for a prefix to the serials when they changed the hub thread to a finer type on the X type hub. (F for Fine, I guess).

    http://www.oldbike.eu/museum/bike-i-d/1910-1914-sturmey-archer-type-x-three-speed/

    The page comes from a book:

    "THE STURMEY ARCHER STORY" by Tony Hadland 1988

    This is a rare book, long out of print. See the price here:

    https://www.abebooks.com/Sturmey-Archer-Story-Tony-Hadland/22521834620/bd

    Tony Hadland still maintained an interest in this until at least 2012, when he wrote the end of the story, and published it online. This proabaly gives an idea of the detail of the content.

    https://hadland.wordpress.com/2012/07/02/the-sturmey-archer-story-supplement/

    You may be able to contact him through the link at the base of the page. I guess if anyone should know, it would be he.

    Best Regards,

    Adrian
     
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  3. #23 Posted Dec 20, 2017

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    Yes...I have reached out to both Tony Hadland and Sturmey Archer (SunRace).
     
    #23 fordsnake, Dec 20, 2017
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  4. #24 Posted Dec 21, 2017
    sam
    sam

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    The question was asked "did Sturmey Archer( in England) make 36 hole tricoaster hubs?" I'm of the belief they did. Export trade was an important part of their business. France,Canada and the U.S. all used the 36 hole rims---why would they pass up such an opportunity. And I have a set of old 36 hole rod brake rims made in England. Got them from Oldy57 as they were made for the Canadian market.
     
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  5. #25 Posted Dec 21, 2017

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    The intent of this post was to address the TYPE ‘S’ on the S-A Tricoaster hub – American-made between 1914-1919.
    Why those years? Because the earliest known evidence of the TYPE ‘S’ Tricoaster was manufactured at the King Sewing Machine Co.,Chicago, late 1914. The last known appearance on US bicycles (around 1919)? I’m not sure about this date?

    Many of us forget about the importance of WW1 and how it impacted the bicycle manufacturing! When America finally joined its allies to fight in 1917, the US government subsequently placed restrictions on the production and manufacturing of bicycles and its parts!

    SA WAR .jpg


    (Indian, one of many manufacturers complied with the government's restrictions)

    SA Indian .jpg



    When the King Sewing Machine Co began manufacturing the Tricoaster in 1914 , England was already at war! Around the same time, the British government took control of the entire Sturmey Archer Nottingham factory to supply its troops!

    SA WAR 2.jpg


    When the war ended in 1918…many bikes were just warmed-over models of their previous year (inventory was low)...there was nothing new!
    (below is an announcement for the Indian - note ND as rear option).

    Indain SA.jpg

    I offer Indian as an example, because the Sturmey Archer Tricoaster was optional equipment.

    SA Indian Ad.jpg


    As a side note: in 1919 the Black Beauty offered a 36 or 28 hole drilled Tricoaster (US made)
    SA black Beauty .jpg


    So, Sam, with this chronological timeline of the S-A Tricoaster short life, what year do you believe the exporting of the English hub occurred? Because, all my documented evidence pre-1914 suggests the early British S-A Tricoasters were drilled w/40 holes. However, post WW1, S-A Nottingham did offer a Tricoaster 36 & 40 hole hub.

    Tircoaster catalog .jpg
    40 drilled .jpg
     
    #25 fordsnake, Dec 21, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2017
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  6. #26 Posted Dec 29, 2017

    Finally riding a big boys bike

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    Hi Fordsnake,

    Thanks for publishing the details of WW1 restrictions to bicycle manufacture in the US. There were similar restrictions during WW2, but this is the first time I'd seen them for WW1.

    Incidentally, do you have a date for the first newspaper article? I think it would have been in October 1918, rather than 1917, because Bernard Baruch only became chairman in Jan 1918.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Industries_Board

    As a result, it would have had little influence on Bicycle manufacture, with the war finishing Nov 11th 1918, unless it was kept in place for the Russian Expeditions of 1919.

    Do you mind if I copy the articles for use in an article about the WW1 Columbia Military Model?

    Thanks,

    Best Regards,

    Adrian
     
    #26 Mercian, Dec 29, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2017
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  7. #27 Posted Dec 29, 2017

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    Adrian, That restriction clause is a "Chitown" discovery. Chris is one of the best forensic sleuths the CABE has. You're right about the date, see post #107 https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/show-your-davis-built-bicycles.20560/page-6

    My statement was to recognize the impact the war had on bicycle manufacturing after America joined its allies in 1917. Prior to this mandatory "restriction" policy (that lasted for a few months) bicycle makers were requested to voluntarily build armaments! Here are a few excerpts from manufacturers that pledged to do their patriotic part.
    Patriotic .gif
    Hendee .gif
    Dutch Cleranser .gif
     
    #27 fordsnake, Dec 29, 2017
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  8. #28 Posted Dec 29, 2017

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    After the Armistice, many manufacturers suffered great loss from their war involvement. The "restriction" policy was immediately termed as a voluntary "conservation" policy.
    conservation 1.gif
    conservation 3.gif
    conservation 2.gif
     
    #28 fordsnake, Dec 29, 2017
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  9. #29 Posted Dec 30, 2017

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    Thanks for the references and further clarification, Fordsnake.

    The great losses felt by the manufacturers were still in their memories when WW2 came around. The damage to the motor industry due to overproduction, and the government selling surplus nearly new vehicles into the civilian market was huge (although it has been argued that this availability of cheap trucks also grew the industry later when the cheap trucks needed replacing, and the buyers who had come to rely on them could now only purchase direct from the manufacturer). One result of this bad memory was that in WW2 there was an agreement that military vehicles produced in the US and shipped overseas would not be reimported. This is one reason why the vehicles were either sold cheaply in other countries, or destroyed/dumped at sea at war end.

    The surplus of WW1 also means that today there are still new/unissued items of web equipment being released from storage that were made in 1917/18.

    Best Regards,

    Adrian
     
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  10. #30 Posted Dec 30, 2017

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    One manufacturer that never recovered from the war’s intervention was The Davis Sewing Machine Company. If you thought bicycle manufacturing was the bread and butter of The Davis Sewing Machine Company...you would be wrong...it was their sewing machines!

    Davis Sewing.gif

    By the end of the war…Davis had a surplus of sewing machines (Posts #2 & #3) https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/davis-sewing-machine-co-info.32329/

    And to make matters worse, Sears, Roebuck Company, their largest client canceled their sewing machines contract! Forcing The Davis Sewing Machine Co., to sell their business! Subsequently, Horace Huffman (son of George P. Huffman, founder of the Davis Sewing Machine Co) was placed in charge of liquidating the Davis assets. Huffman used the profits to form the Huffman Manufacturing Company. That’s another bicycle story that deserves another thread.
    Davis .gif

    For now, I want to stay focused on the Sears, Roebuck Company’s involvement and its influence on bicycle manufacturing.
    More to come…
     
    #30 fordsnake, Dec 30, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2017
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