Terminology

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all riders

Finally riding a big boys bike
As long as we're making U-turns while driving in the wrong lane going the wrong direction on a one-way street. Try this one on. Seven different ways that words containing the tetragraph 'ough' are pronounced. Each of the following words has a different pronunciation for ough. Do you know each of the seven?

rough
cough
drought
although
bought
slough
thorough

These are words used in common American English and do not include words used in British, Scottish, Australian, and New Zealand English. Most of those words are names of places so they don't count unless you live there.
Now you know why people immigrating to America find it difficult to learn English. Basically the only rule is 'There are no rules when it comes to pronunciation.'
All bear the stamp of the Germanic origin of English. It's a wonder some of these have not yet transformed into more Anglicized forms. Consider Draught-now Draft or Draw (as in beer for instance). Or Plough--now commonly Plow, Perhaps Americanized is more accurate
 

Balloonatic

Riding my '39 Silver King 26X
Language is what binds us. It is a living, breathing, flowing thing that changes and where the shared vernacular gets added to all the time, or words or phrases fall completely out of use. It's also give and take. It requires collaboration with another person in conversation. As long as you both know the thing you're talking about, then you agree. If one wants to use the correct terminology when describing things, that's passion for the subject, and a desire to elevate the conversation, not necessarily snobbery, or pedantry. A person's lexicon is there to share with others, but also what defines them. Should we be arguing over nomenclature? I don't think so... we should be trying to learn from one another and shaping this thing we all share, language.

When I first rode a high-wheeler I didn't really know what to call it? Big wheel bike seemed more like a plastic trike you rode as a kid, and Penny Farthing didn't make any sense since I had no idea they were coins from England. Some called it a high-wheeler, but even that sounded like the circus. Our bike brother TR6SC, (RIP Mikey) who was showing me how to ride it told me that in the day (1870s to 1890s) they were often simply referred to as "the machine" and often lived in the house; a very serious, revered piece of personal transportation equipment. not a kid's toy or for fun/exercise. After a while they were called "ordinary"... they are anything but ordinary these days, but they were quite ordinary by about 1875.. There are references to them as "the horse that nerry says neigh", they were the only other choice for personal transportation next to something you had to feed, clean, house and take to the vet... the ordinary quickly became far superior.

Sorry if that sounds elite, snobby, or pedantic, I'm just trying to elevate the conversation by enlightening; you are welcome to tell me to go F myself but unfortunately that's the dead end of the conversation.
 
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Rivnut

I live for the CABE
One last one from yours truly.

A different spelling for a common noun.

GHOTI

Anyone care to take a guess?
 

Barto

I live for the CABE
I used to run an Aviation School. We teach people from all over the world and at times using full translation.- need to be specific in what we say, no slang or jargon. Had one instructor who we hired from the shop who always used slang terms for some components, Dog bone, Dog Teeth, Slider, and a few more vulgar terms. Sure, every one in our shops understood but our foreign customers struggled with the terms. Not sure why he persisted, especially when speaking to people who are not native English speakers, but overall he was a great instructor. I think he just liked to test me..lol!

With that said, this is a hobby, even if we call it the wrong thing but we understand anyways...what ever! The world is totally falling apart right now and I just wanna chill, crack a beer or two, sit on my butt and pretend everything is all right. Hell, Ill go sit in my bike room just to find peace
 

SKPC

I live for the CABE
The English language is wonderfully ambiguous. This flexibility allows lawyers to prosper and everyone to say the same thing while disagreeing at the same time. Politics also falls prey to this ambiguity while solidifying it. Like Clinton said..."I did not have SR with that woman!" Wisdom-filled sayings from our past that addresses this ambiguity we tend to ignore. If so, it unfortunately relegates us to repeat our past failures. A good one in this context is..."Believe none of what you hear (or read) and 1/2 of what you see". Conversational colloquialisms allow us to say the same thing in a different way, right? Popcorn?
 
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Autocycleplane

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Seven pages of nonsense and not a single person has bothered to question the obvious logical fallacy presented in the original post. A "pie plate" is slang, a "dropout" is a technical term. Suggesting that someone using slang in an unrelated circumstance would somehow discount their observation about the misuse of a technical term shows poor logic and a lack of critical thinking skills.
 

Freqman1

Riding a '37 Dayton Super Streamline
Seven pages of nonsense and not a single person has bothered to question the obvious logical fallacy presented in the original post. A "pie plate" is slang, a "dropout" is a technical term. Suggesting that someone using slang in an unrelated circumstance would somehow discount their observation about the misuse of a technical term shows poor logic and a lack of critical thinking skills.
Guess I'm just stupid my point was if ya want to be technical then be technical--big picture it don't make a rat's azz if 98% of the people understand what you're talking about. I guess there's another one for the ignore list!
 

Superman1984

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Language is what binds us. It is a living, breathing, flowing thing that changes and where the shared vernacular gets added to all the time, or words or phrases fall completely out of use. It's also give and take. It requires collaboration with another person in conversation. As long as you both know the thing you're talking about, then you agree. If one wants to use the correct terminology when describing things, that's passion for the subject, and a desire to elevate the conversation, not necessarily snobbery, or pedantry. A person's lexicon is there to share with others, but also what defines them. Should we be arguing over nomenclature? I don't think so... we should be trying to learn from one another and shaping this thing we all share, language.

When I first rode a high-wheeler I didn't really know what to call it? Big wheel bike seemed more like a plastic trike you rode as a kid, and Penny Farthing didn't make any sense since I had no idea they were coins from England. Some called it a high-wheeler, but even that sounded like the circus. Our bike brother TR6SC, (RIP Mikey) who was showing me how to ride it told me that in the day (1870s to 1890s) they were often simply referred to as "the machine" and often lived in the house; a very serious, revered piece of personal transportation equipment. not a kid's toy or for fun/exercise. After a while they were called "ordinary"... they are anything but ordinary these days, but they were quite ordinary by about 1875.. There are references to them as "the horse that nerry says neigh", they were the only other choice for personal transportation next to something you had to feed, clean, house and take to the vet... the ordinary quickly became far superior.

Sorry if that sounds elite, snobby, or pedantic, I'm just trying to elevate the conversation by enlightening; you are welcome to tell me to go F myself but unfortunately that's the dead end of the conversation.
Go F Yourself. Just kidding! I have no idea what to call those damn things either other than high wheels as it's higher than any other bicycle wheel I have ever seen. I doubt I could ever ride 1 but I do understand how they surpassed a horse & or buggies. I love the fact they even carried pistols & or guns on them for protection from dogs, kids, people etc who would attack/rob them. I assume only the wealthier side had them in those times. Way beyond my time but I am still amazed to see them so I respect people who enjoy them.
 

1motime

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
The original poster used the term "Terminology". In general. No sub heading about slang or technical usage only. Seven pages of words and an implication gets taken personally. Sticks and stones can break my bones but wo............... Popcorn at the very least
 

Rivnut

I live for the CABE
FISH!

Get it? GH as in tough, O as pronounced in little women, and TI as in nation.

English is such a crazy language.
Did you know that or Google it? Your explanation is the same as Google uses when it gives George Bernard Shaw credit for it.

When I was teaching, I used to tell the kids that they could figure it out by studying this. "You live in a nation of rough women."
 

all riders

Finally riding a big boys bike
The hood is the bonnet; the trunk is the boot. So is the VW Bug engine under the boot?

The biggest situation in the Riviera group is trying to convince people that that thing under the hood that runs on fuel is an engine, NOT a motor. Engines run on fuel; motors run on electricity. And they call themselves "car guys."
Well, true--but who wants to ride an enginecycle?
 
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