Tire Glue?

Discussion in 'Antique Bicycles Pre-1933' started by Ed Minas, Dec 5, 2017.

  1. #1 Posted Dec 5, 2017

    Finally riding a big boys bike

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    Just received my new Robert Dean Tires. They are stunning and I am very pleased.
    Looking for suggestions on types of glue. Instructions say use rubber cement but there are many types of rubber cement with many varying strengths. I welcome suggestions on glues others have used and techniques on how to glue the tires to the wood rims with out making a big mess.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. #2 Posted Dec 5, 2017

    Cruisin' on my Bluebird

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    tufo rim tape
    All I ever use
     
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  3. #3 Posted Dec 5, 2017

    I live for the CABE

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    There is a trick to using the TUFO tape, read the instruction or find videos, or you will end up learning on your second one. Its worked for me also.
     
  4. #4 Posted Dec 6, 2017

    I live for the CABE

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    use tape, ending up with glue everywhere and tyres stuck to your hands is not good!
    comical for onlookers though.
     
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  5. #5 Posted Dec 6, 2017

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    Ed, Most any rim cement or even adhesive tire tape as DNC1 recommended will work fine. The most important thing you can possibly do is thoroughly clean the rim and the tire for a good glue bond. Especially the tire, Robert Dean tires have sort of an oily film that must be completely cleaned off the gluing surface of the tire, otherwise no matter what cement you choose to use it won't hold the tire.

    I highly recommend using a rubber prep cleaner on the tire to remove the oily film.

    51uqp%2BHPbtL._SY445_.jpg
     
  6. #6 Posted Dec 6, 2017

    Look Ma, No Hands!

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    Ed, whatever contact glue you decide on, it is important to keep in mind that the tire pressure must be maintained around 50 psi or the glue may separate off the rubber. Also, the tires must be heated up first before mounting to stretch it on the rim. Leaving them out in the sun on a hot summer day works, or if it is cold outside, a torpedo type kerosene heater works good. Just don't get the tire too close!
     
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  7. #7 Posted Dec 6, 2017

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

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    Continental makes rim cement for carbon fiber rims.
    This might work well on wood rims as well.
    The important thing to remember, is that it is a contact cement.
    You only need a slight film on each surface to be effective.
    Use it sparingly, right down the center of the contact point with the rim and tire, and folliw the manufacturers instructions, and you should have good results.
     
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  8. #8 Posted Dec 6, 2017

    Cruisin' on my Bluebird

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    I used a 3M adhesive (yellow, snot like) on my robert deans, worked great! Sand the Wood part of the rim smooth where the glue is going. Also, once the tire is in place, there is little time to get the tire aligned. I set up a Jig on my workbench where I clamped on the axle Nut and spun the wheel and could easily see where the tire needed some adjusting. Air pressure is VERY important!
     
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  9. #9 Posted Dec 6, 2017

    Finally riding a big boys bike

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    I can’t tell everyone who replied how much I appreciate your help. I searched this topic before I posted the question so as not to be redundant, but there was not a comphensive discussion as was just posted on this thread. Thank you so much.
     
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  10. #10 Posted Dec 7, 2017

    Cruisin' on my Bluebird

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    Sorry, I only have one bottle

    us-cement.jpg
     
  11. #11 Posted Dec 7, 2017

    I live for the CABE

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    The thing about rubber cement is you are supposed to apply the cement to both the tire and the rim and let set for a while then bring both together, once together they cant be separated easily. Here is what I do. Mount the tire on the wheel, centering the tire evenly. Pull a section of tire away from rim, if real tight, just roll it away. Place something like a piece of wood between the tire and rim and apply cement to both surfaces trying not to get cement on tire sidewall. Let cement set for 15 minutes or so and them bring both tire and rim together. Do the same to the next area. By doing small areas at a time you can avoid the mess and can keep tire aligned on wheel.
     
  12. #12 Posted Dec 11, 2017 at 6:31 PM

    Finally riding a big boys bike

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    Thanks kunzog. That is helpful information.
     
  13. #13 Posted Dec 13, 2017 at 1:47 PM

    I live for the CABE

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    That definitely seems easier and less messy than the trad. method I used:
    One coat/application to both tyre and rim, leave for 24 hours .
    Repeat above, leave for another 24 hours.
    Apply a third coat to the tyre, leave it to dry a little and then wrestle it into position with much cursing/wailing and general existential angst. Then go and purchase large amounts of acetone in order to try and clean up any errant glue residue on your lovingly revarnished rims whilst trying not to cry!

    That's why I'll be using tape in future.