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dnc1

I live for the CABE
Apr 1, 2016
1,469
3,467
52
Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK
Fairbanks wood rim co - factory in England. After Importing rims to the UK in 1894 demand was such that In 1895 Fairbanks rented a facility in an old lace factory located in Draycott, Derbyshire called Draycott Mills that still stands today. Also located in this old lace mill was the manufacturing of the Simson lever Chain at the same time ( Lever Chain and Cycle Co. ). The facility was huge and host to many industries in the day. In fact, it is said that the building was based on the dimensions of Noha's Ark.

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View attachment 722496

View attachment 722521 View attachment 722519 View attachment 722518

Simpson "Lever" Chain, a much-boomed novelty which enjoyed a brief but hectic career, 1895 - 1897. The first patent W.S.Simpson took 27th December 1894. Simpson Lever Chain and Cycle Co., Ltd. was a maker of the Simpson lever chain, this company premises at 110 Regent Street, London and works at Draycott, Derbyshire. This maker offered his own bicycles under name "Simpson" lever chains have been used by many riders on other bicycles. „The great Humber Company took up the idea and the famous Gladiator firm of Paris adopted it. The result was that riders using the chain began to sweep the board, and by January Simpson lever chain riders had made all the existing word's records from a quarter of a mile to forty-four miles, and since then the successes have been constant!!!!“. Wrote The Illustrated London News 20th June 1896

View attachment 722500
Thanks for the info re. the Derbyshire factory, I bet they're now very desirable/very expensive apartments now at the mill.
 
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filmonger

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Dec 25, 2010
4,867
5,394
Dublin, Ireland
Edward B Dake..... 1897 Pat rim joint ( Do not confuse with Drake )

US579673-0.png


E. B. BAKE. RIM JOINT FOR VEHICLE WHEELS.

No. 579,673. Patented Mar. 30, 1897.

' WITNESSES v IJVVENTOR WW 6%. {9w

' flaw,

( Attorney nu: nonms mins 00. momma. wAsnmmox. o. c.

tion of parts, all as hereinafter described, and

EDWVARD B. DAKE, OF MUSKEGON,

rrnn STATES ATENT Fries.

MICHIGAN, ASSIGNOR TO HORACE ALVORD, OF PAINESVILLE, OHIO.

RIM-JOINT FOR VEHICLE-WHEELS.

atent No. 579,673, dated March 30, 1897.

Serial No. 558,104. (No model.)

To ctZZwhom it may concern.-

Beit known that I, EDWARD B. DAKE, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Muskegon, in the county of Muskegon and State of Michigan, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Rim-Joints for Vehicle-Vheels; and I do declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to letters of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

Figure 1 of the drawings is a perspective view of wheel-felly with the invention applied thereto. Fig. 2 is an enlarged perspective of the two sections of the felly to be joined. Fig. 3 is a plan view of one of the sections.

This invention has relation to a joint for the wood rims or fellies of vehicle-wheels, and has for its object the provision of a joint which cannot be pulled apart in a sidewise direction, and which is strong and rigid.

WVith this object in view the invention consists in the novel construction and combinapointed out in the appended claim.

Referring to the accompanying drawings, the letters A and B designate two sections of a wheel-rim or felly which are united in accordance with this invention. Each of said sections is provided at its end with a series of parallel interlocking tenons, as a, which conform to the general contour or curvature of the rim and which fit between a corresponding series of tenons on the opposing section'which, for distinction, are marked b. In the present instance I have shown each section as having three of these tenons, but I do not wish to be limited to any particular number.

The tenonsare of equal thickness throughout their length, and their lateral faces are parallel and vertical, and the end of each is continuously beveled from its upper to its lower surface, as at 0, adjacent tenons having directly opposite bevels. The abutments for said tenons are also alternately beveled, as at d.

This feature of beveling the ends of the tenons enables the joint to hold glue much better than would be the case were they formed with square abutting ends. It also greatly strengthens the joint. The opposite bevels hold the sections from all tendency to buckle either outward or inward and renders it impossible for the sections to separate except by a direct longitudinal movement away from each other. It will also appear that this feature greatly strengthens the joint owing to the fact that the wood between the tenons is not entirely cut away, but is left to increase the strength of the abutments, and that this increase of strength is distributed equally upon both the upper and lower portions of the joint and upon opposite sides of the transverse center of the joint, adjacent tenons being of different lengths upon the same side of the joint and their end bearings upon the beveled walls of the interspaces of the opposing section being at different points with relation to such transverse center.

I am aware that it is not broadly new to form a rim-joint having a series of interfitting tenons, as instances of such joints are shown in the English Patents No. 503 of 1895 to Cooley and No. 7,062 of 1894 to Marble; also in the United States patent to Rastetter, No. 528,741, of November 6, 1894:, and I hereby disclaim the constructions shown in those patents. The present invention is clearly distinguished from the joint shown in the said English patent to Oooley in that the beveled abutments between the tongues or tenons are not extended to form a second lower set of tongues or tenons which are opposed to the first or upper set, the tongues or tenons of both sets being of gradually-decreasing vertical thickness which renders them less strong. I11 the present construction each tongue or tenon maintains its full vertical thickness to a point near its end where the bevel commences. The invention is distinguished from the joints shown in the said patents to Rastetter and Marble in the features of its beveled ends, which, as above pointed out, greatly increases the strength of the joint and decreases its tendency to buckle in either direction. The invention is also distinguished from the said patents in the feature whereby adjacent tenons are oppositely beveled, which also greatly adds to the the rear Wallsof the interspaces of each end strength of the joint. being beveled alternately in opposite direc- Having thus described my invention, what tions to correspond with these engaging pro- I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters jeetions.

5 Patent, is In testimony whereof I afiix my signature 1 5 A wheel-felly having interlocking ends, in presence of two Witnesses. each end being provided with a series of par- EDWARD B. DAKE. allcl projections separatedby interspaces, the Witnesses: extremity of the projections of each end being R. J USTIN RoTE,

i0 beveled alternatelyin opposite directions and V. A. MURRAY.

Norace Alvord who was assigned the Pat.

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filmonger

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Dec 25, 2010
4,867
5,394
Dublin, Ireland
Huseby Bicycle Co......

They produced Bamboo bicycle frames, bars and rims. The picture below iwas taken 1897 - again I will do more indepth research on this comapny soon.

Artistry-Milwaukee-history-Huseby-Cycle-Co.jpg


The first known manufacturing company tenant of the building was Huseby Cycle Company in 1896. Although the company was not among the largest in this time, it was an innovative and unique cycle company. Probably the most significant feature of the Huseby bikes were their use of wood in manufacturing wooden bikes: “Wood frames are a specialty with this company, and they are the only manufacturers of the same in this or any other country.”

The company’s modern production line was able to make 40 bikes as a day, employing 75 skilled workers. Just one year after the establishment of the Huseby Cycle Co., William Casper, the president, died on April 16, 1897, at the age of 58. This, along with the emergence of affordable automobiles for the public around the time, spelled the end for the company.

bamboo-bike-Huseby.jpg


Assignment after William's Death 1896 To Hugo Casper

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Hugo authorized to sell plant..... ( both from the Wheel )

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Last edited:

shoe3

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Feb 2, 2011
827
568
Springfield, United States
Huseby Bicycle Co......

They produced Bamboo bicycle frames, bars and rims. The picture below iwas taken 1897 - again I will do more indepth research on this comapny soon.
I wonder what happened to the Dietz Museum I assume Wi. ????
View attachment 724242

The first known manufacturing company tenant of the building was Huseby Cycle Company in 1896. Although the company was not among the largest in this time, it was an innovative and unique cycle company. Probably the most significant feature of the Huseby bikes were their use of wood in manufacturing wooden bikes: “Wood frames are a specialty with this company, and they are the only manufacturers of the same in this or any other country.”

The company’s modern production line was able to make 40 bikes as a day, employing 75 skilled workers. Just one year after the establishment of the Huseby Cycle Co., William Casper, the president, died on April 16, 1897, at the age of 58. This, along with the emergence of affordable automobiles for the public around the time, spelled the end for the company.

View attachment 724243

Assignment after William's Death 1896 To Hugo Casper

View attachment 724763

Hugo authorized to sell plant..... ( both from the Wheel )

View attachment 724764
 

retrobuilder

Finally riding a big boys bike
Oct 8, 2017
115
41
64
Alpharetta, GA
Older posting but a gem of a personal discovery today...also shows that with sadles- what new is a repeat of old for center RELEIF saddles...AWESOME! :)
 

filmonger

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Dec 25, 2010
4,867
5,394
Dublin, Ireland
Stearns manufactured their own wood rims - early use of V-shaped rim 1899 and an explanation as to why they used this shape for their wood rims.. Again, I will have to dig deeper into their wood rim production.

From the Cycle age and trade review 1898/99

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filmonger

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Dec 25, 2010
4,867
5,394
Dublin, Ireland
Additional Information for H.G. Shepard ( more detailed info at the start of the thread on his company. ) Here is an Ad from 1894 and some Patent info filed in 1894 and granted in 1895.

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US540074-0.png

H. G. SHEPARD.

MACHINE FOR REUESSING'WHEEL RIMS.

' No. 540,074. Patented May 28, 1895.

UNTTED STATEs PATENT EETEE.

HARVEY G. SHEPARD, OF NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO G. SHEPARD & SONS, OF SAME PLACE.

MACHINE FOR RECESSING WHEEL-RIMS.

SPECIFICATION forming part Of Letters Patent NO. 540,074, dated May 28, 1895.

Application filed May 14, 1894.. Serial No. 511 ,162. (No model.)

To 12% whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, HARVEY G. SHEPARD, of New Haven, in the county of New Haven and State of Connecticut, have invented a new Improvement in Machines for Recessing WVheel-Rims; and I do hereby declare the following, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings and the letters of reference marked thereon, to be a full, clear, and exact description of the same, and which said drawings constitute part of this specification, and represent, in

Figure 1, a plan view of a machine constructed in accordance with my invention; Fig. 2, a view thereof in front elevation; Fig. 3, a view of the machine in vertical section on the line a b of Fig. 1; Fig. 4, a view of the machine in transverse section on the line a d of said figure; Fig. 5, a sectional view of the wheel-rim, showing by broken lines the recess formed by my machine; Fig. 6, a plan View of the abutting ends of the wheel-rim after they have been recessed.

My invention relates to an improved machine for peripherally recessing wheel-rims, preparatory to the reception of a joint-piece uniting their abutted ends, the object being to produce a simple, convenient and effective machine for the purpose.

With these ends in view, my invention'consists in a machine having certain details of construction and combinations of parts as will be hereinafter described and pointed out in the claims.

In carrying out my invention, I locate a head-block A upon a table B, adapted to be moved laterally and longitudinally upon two horizontal frame-pieces C C, united at one end by a cross-piece C and supported upon uprights, of which two, C 0 are shown in Fig. 2. The frontframe-piece C carries two boxes D D, in which a shaft D, furnished with a rotary cutter D is mounted, the projecting outer end of the said shaft being provided with a pulley D receiving a belt driven from any convenient source of power. The headblock A is secured to the table B, by means of three bolts A A A, passing through elongated holes in the block, which is adjusted forward by means of a wedge A interposed between its rear end, and a small fixed block A The forward end of the head-block is conformed in curvature to the curvature of the inner periphery of the wheel-rim E, to be recessed by the machine, the center of the said edge of the block being centrally cut away to form an observation opening a, through which the abutting ends of the rim may be observed.

For the purpose of clamping the rims upon the table, I employ two cams F F, each provided with an eccentrically arranged handle F F. It will be understood, however, that the particular construction of these holding devices may be varied. The forward portion of the table B is provided with apair of movable jaws G and G, the inner ends of which are separated sufficiently to adapt them to engage with the opposite edges of the wheelrim, as shown in Fig. 3, the separation of the jawspermitting the rotary cutter to pass between them. It will be observed that these jaws are arranged in line with the head-block, and that both the jaws and head-block are arranged at a right angle to the rotary cutter D Thelowerjaw Gis furnished withadepending lug G which receives theinner end of a horizontallyarranged adj usting-screw G mounted in a box G secured to the table 13, and furnished at its outer end with a hand-wheel G by means ofwhich the said jaws are moved back and forth, according to the direction in which it is turned. Two guide-plates H H secured to the table by screws it, take into the op posite sides of the lower jaw G, and guide the same. The said jaws are secured together by means by heavy set-screws I I, and adjusted by means of four adj usting-screws I I mounted in the upper jaw, and impinging upon the lower edge, as shown in Fig. 3, which shows how the upper jaw fits into the lower jaw. The lower face of the table B, is provided with two bars or stops J J, arranged parallel with each other, and respectively adjacent to the two parallel frame-pieces C C, but having less separation than the said frame-pieces, so as to permit the lateral movement of the table B upon them, the said lateral movement of the table being gaged by adjusting-screws J mounted in the bar J and extending forward for engagement with a metal wearingplate J which faces the inner face of the frame-piece O, as shown in Fig. 3. Two ad j usting-screws K, vertically arranged in the forward end of the table, impinge at their lower ends upon a ledge K applied to the outer face of the frame-piece C. These screws are employed when it is desired to tilt the table,which may sometimes be convenient.

In using my improved apparatus, I first place a rim upon the table, and clamp it in place by means of the cams F F, with its ends abutted in the center of the curved outer face of the fixed head-block A. The two jaws G G are then moved inward by means of the hand-wheel 9 until their inner ends engage with the opposite edges of the abutting ends of the rim on opposite sides of the joint, so as to hold the said ends of the rim firmly against the forward end of the head-block. The table is then moved laterally rearward until its bar J engages with the frame-piece C, after which it is moved longitudinally on the said pieces so as to cause the cutter to partially cut the recess E in the abutting ends of the rim, as shown in Figs. 5 and 6. The table is then moved back to its starting position, and drawn forward until the adjusting screws J in the bar J engage with the wearing-plate J after which the plate is moved toward the cutter again, which this time makes a deeper cut and completes the recess E. The cams F F are then operated to release the rim which is replaced by another, and so on. The long oval recess E thus formed, is divided equally between the two abutting ends of the rim, and is designed to receive a joint-piece of corresponding form, but not herein shown.

It will be understood that my improved device is adapted in its adjustment to receive rims of different sizes, and to make a recess of more or less depth as required. It is apparent furthermore that some changes may be made in its construction without departing from my invention, and I would therefore have it understood that I do not limit myself to the exact construction shown and described, but hold myself at liberty to make such alterations as fall within the spirit and scope of my invention.

The wheel-rim shown in Figs. 5 and 6, has been made the subject of an application filed January 24, 1894:, serially numbered 497,871, and is not claimed herein.

Having fully described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. In a machine for recessing wheel-rims, the combination with a longitudinally movable table, of a head-block mounted thereupon, means mounted upon the table for clamping a wheel rim thereto, a pair of jaws having their inner ends separated for engaging with the opposite edges of the wheel-rim and forcing the same against the head-block, means for operatingthe said jaws, and arotary cutter arranged at a right angle to the jaws which it is permitted to pass between by the separation of their inner ends, which also permits the cutting of the wood by the cutter at apointbetweenthe points engaged by their said ends, substantially as described.

2. In a machine for recessing wheel-rims, the combination with a table, of a head-block secured thereto, having its outer end conformed in curvature to the curvature of the rims tobe recessed, means for holding a rim with its abutting ends against the said curved end of the head-block, a pair of movable jaws mounted upon the table and having their inner ends separated for engaging with the opposite edges of the wheel-rim which they force against the curved portion of the head-block, and a rotatable cutter arranged at a right angle to the said jaws which it is permitted to pass between by the separation of their inner ends, which also permits the cutting of the wood by the cutter at a point between the points engaged by the jaws, substantially'as described.

3. In a machine for recessing wheel-rims,

. the combination with a longitudinally and lat erally movable table, of a head-block fixed thereto, means for securing a wheel-rim upon the table with its abutting ends engaged with the head-block, a pair of movable jaws fixed to the table, and having their inner ends separated to engage with the opposite edges of a rim mounted thereupon, and a rotary cutter arranged at a right angle to the said jaws, which it is permitted to pass between by the separation of their inner ends, which also permits cutting of the wood by the cutter at a point between the points engaged by the said jaws, substantially as described.

4. In a machine for recessing wheel-rims,

the combination with a longitudinally movable table, of a head-block mounted thereupon and adapted to form a bearing for the abutting ends of a wheel-rim, and cut away to expose the same for observation, means mounted upon thetable for securing the wheel-rim thereto with its ends bearing on the block, jaws mounted upon the table, and having their inner ends separated to engage with the opposite edges of the abutting ends of the rim which they' press against the head block, means for operating the said jaws, and a rotary cutter arranged at a right angle to the jaws, which it is permitted to pass between in the separation of the same, which also permits the wood to be cut away by the cutter at a point between the points engaged by the jaws,-substantially as described.

5. In a machine for recessing wheel-rims,

. the combination with a longitudinally movable table, of a head-block mounted thereupon,

a pair of movable jaws having their inner ends separated for engagement with the opposite edges of the abutting ends of the wheelrim which they force against the head-block, one of the said jaws being movable toward and away from the other to vary their separation to conform to the width of the rims to be recessed, means for operating the said jaws back and forth toward and away from the mounted upon the table, and having their inner ends separated for engagement with the opposite edges-of the abutting ends of the rim which they force against the head-block, a rotary cutter arranged at a right angle to the jaws, which it is permitted to pass between by their separation, which also permits the wood to be cut away by the cutter at a point between the points engaged by the jaws,

and two stops for limiting the lateral movement of the table, one of the said stops being provided with adjusting screws for varying the range of such movement, substantially as described.

7. In a machine for recessin'g wheel-rims, the combination with a table, of a head-block mounted thereupon, movable jaws also mounted upon the table and having their inner ends separated for engaging with the opposite edges of a wheel-rim which they force against the block, a rotary cutter located at a right angle to the jaws, which it is permitted to pass between by their separation, which also permits the wood between the jaws to be cut away by the cutter at a point between the jaws, and means for tilting the table vertically, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

HARVEY e. SHEPARD.

' Witnesses:

GEO. D. SEYMOUR, J. H. SHUMWAY.
 
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filmonger

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Dec 25, 2010
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Dublin, Ireland
Shepards New Improved Patent... 1896

US564802-0.png


H. G SHEPARD. WOODEN WHEEL RIM.

(No Model.)

No. 564,802. Patented July 28, 1896.'

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HARVEY G. SHEPARD, OF NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO H. G. SHEPARD & SONS, OF SAME PLACE.

WOODEN WHEEL-RIM.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 564,802, dated July 28, 1896. 7

Application filed January 24,1894. Serial No. 497,871. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern;

Be it known that I, HARVEY G. SHEPARD, of New Haven, in the county of New Haven and State of Connecticut, have invented a new Improvement in Wooden Wheel-Rims; and I do hereby declare the following, when taken in connection with accompanying drawings and the letters of reference marked thereon, to be a full, clear, and exact description of the same, and which said drawings constitute part of this specification, and rep resent, in

Figure 1, a View in side elevation of a wheelrim constructed in accordance with my invention; Fig. 2, an enlarged broken plan View thereof; Fig. 3, a View of the rim in longitudinal section on the line a b of Fig. 2; Fig. i, a view of the rim in transverse section on the line a d of the same figure.

My invention relates to an improvement in wooden rims for cycle-wheels, the object being to produce at a low cost for manufacture a light, simple, strong, and durable rim constructed with particular reference to taking the strain of the spokes and to resisting exposure to the weather.

With these ends in view my invention consists in a wooden wheel-rim having certain details of construction'and combinations of parts, as will be hereinafter described, and pointed out in the claims.

In carrying out my invention I employ a single long strip of wood A, such as hickory, ash, or elm, and of any desired cross-section, so long as it has its outer periphery concaved suitably to the reception of a tire. Its ends are formed squarely with reference to its length, so as to be abutted squarely together, or'at a right angle to the length ofthe strip. The outer 'face of each end of the strip has a recess B formed in it, the recess of one end of the strip corresponding to the recess of the other end thereof and both recesses sinking below the concavity of the strip; As shown herein, these recesses are nearly as wide as the strips at their outer ends, but taper gradu ally in width and depth as they progress inward. They are designed to receive a supplemental binding-strip C, which is applied over the joint formed by the squarely-abutting ends of the rim-strip A and inserted into and secured in the said recesses, to which it conforms in shape, being thickest in its center and tapering gradually laterally and longitudinally therefrom. It is also made to conform to the curvature of the outer face of the rim-strip, so that the concavity of one is made coincident with that of the other. This binding-strip is secured in place by means of glue or other equivalent material, and also by two of the wheel-spokes D D, which are passed through it at points opposite of its longitudinal center, as indicated by broken lines in Fig. 3.

By abutting the ends of the rim -strips squarely together they efiectively resist the strain of the spokes, whereas if the joint is formed by chamfering and lapping the ends of the rim-strip the tension of the spokes exerts a constant effort to cause the two chamfered ends to slide upon each other. Furthermore, the formation of a square joint reduces the opportunity of moisture to work into the joint from the exposed portion of the rim to the minimum, as a square joint makes the shortest line of union between the ends of the rim-strip that can be made. The main por tion of the joint, which may be said to bearound the edges of the supplemental bind- I ing-strip, is located entirely within the outer faceof the rim, and when the same is in use will be concealed and protected by the tire; but independent of the glue or other material used in the formation of the joint the two spokes which pass through the binding-strip and through the abutting ends of the rimstrip cooperate therewith, so as to hold them all together firmly, even in the absence of glue or cement. I also wish to call attention to the fact that the supplemental bindingstrip, being made of wood, yields or springs with the rim, and avoids the formation of a dead-point therein.

I do not of course limit myself to the application of my invention to rims of any particular form in transverse section, as that may be varied according to the dictates of circumstances. It is to be understood, however, that wheel-rims constructed in accordance with my invention will have concave outer peripheries for the reception of tires; nor do I limit myself to recessing the outer faces of the ends of the rim-strip in any particular manner, nor to using a supplemental binding-strip of any particular form, for obviously the shape of the recesses and bind ing-strip may also be varied. I would there fore have it understood that I do not limit myself to the exact construction herein shown and described, but hold myself at liberty to make such changes and alterations as fairly fall within the spirit and scope of my invention. I am aware, however, that it is old to squarely abut the ends of a wheel-felly and connect them by means of a metal bindingstrip applied over the abutting ends of the telly, and secured thereto by inwardly-bent retaining-points located at its ends, and I do not claim that construction broadly; nor do I broadly claim a wooden wheel-rim concaved to receive a tire. Neither do I broadly claim a joint formed by scarfing and abutting two ends and binding them together by means of a short piece of wood set into the space formed by scarfing them, for that is old in the art of woodworking. I am also aware that it is old to construct a suspension-wheel with a wooden rim, the ends of which are directly abutted and overlapped to form a joint.

Having fully described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. A wheel-rim consisting of a circularlybent wooden strip having its ends joined together and the concave tire-seat surface of its end portions grooved or recessed circumferentially, and a wooden lap-strip fitting into and cemented to the walls of the recessed ends of the rim-strip.

2. The herein-describedwooden rinr for bicycle-wheels, composed of a rim-strip and a short supplemental binding-strip, the said rim-strip consisting of a single strip of wood having its outer periphery grooved or con-.

caved throughout its length to adapt it to receive a tire, and also having two recesses corresponding to each other, formed in the outer faces of its respective ends, sinking below its groove and deepest and widest at their outer ends and gradually tapering both in width and depth as they progress inward from the ends of the rim-strip, and-the said bindingstrip being ooncavo-convex inTcross-section, tapering in thickness and width in each direction from its longitudinal center, set into the space formed by recessin g the ends of the rim-strip as described, so that its concaved outer face coincides with the curvature of the groove in the rim-strip, secured in place throughout its length by an adhesive, and located entirely within the edges of the rimstrip, substantially as described, and whereby the said binding-strip being made of wood is elastic and springs with the rim-strip, and whereby, also, the joint formed by the binding-strip is protected from injury and'moisture by the tire which is located in the groove of the rim-strip and covers the binding-strip.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

HARVEY G. SHEPARD.

Vitnesses:

FRED O. EARLE, LILLIAN D. KELsEY.
 
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