Turn of the century content: Wright Van Cleve copycat w/ferrier fork? (PICTURES)

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cudak888

Look Ma, No Hands!
Hello all; long-time resident of Bikeforums.net Classic & Vintage (VLW collector) here.

I stumbled upon this machine during a job that I've been doing for the last two days; figured I would share the photos here as well:

1900_ferrierfork_1.jpg


It's not a Wright Van Cleve, but the tubing, lugs, and "Ferrier" stamped dual plate fork crown seem to imitate this one quite well (save for the geometry), right down to the Ferrier (?) fork crown and blades.

It has a similar seat lug binder on it to some of the other, existing Wright machines; ditto for the rear stays and dropouts. Granted, I'd assume these lugs and tubing were common in their era; hence the similarity to the Wright machine.

1900_ferrierfork_2.jpg


1900_ferrierfork_3.jpg


1900_ferrierfork_5.jpg


Not the Wright badge, obviously:

1900_ferrierfork_4.jpg


Pedal threads are stripped, and the headset has been buggered up as well - both fixable with some brass to the headset threads (plus re-threading) and helicoils to the crankset. Someone stuck a sleeve in the seatpost too, as if they didn't understand the hex binder used back then.

Otherwise, it's pretty solid - save for the severely warped wood rims.

Straight-pull spokes - and folks thought that was innovative in the 1980's. Hardly:

1900_ferrierfork_6.jpg


No luck on getting them to sell, and no - I can't tell you who owns it. Sorry.

-Kurt
 
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cudak888

Look Ma, No Hands!
Man ! That fork is so cool as are the hubs and....well everything.

What's more, it outclasses a Peugeot UO-8 in lightness as well - no more than 25 pounds or so, despite its appearance; about on par with a Paramount P13/15/10. Quite a shock, given what it looks like.

-Kurt
 
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66TigerCat

I live for the CABE
No luck on getting them to sell, and no - I can't tell you who owns it. Sorry.

-Kurt[/QUOTE]

Kurt -

How many other bikes does the owner have ? Anything as interesting ?

Jim
 

cudak888

Look Ma, No Hands!
Interesting bike ! Have any photos of the chainring ?

This is the best I can do. Note the keyhole-style cottered cranks - a design far superior to the conventional cottered crank that became the norm until the 1980's.

1900_ferrierfork_7.jpg


A few other photos:

1900_ferrierfork_8.jpg


1900_ferrierfork_9.jpg

How many other bikes does the owner have ? Anything as interesting ?

Jim

Just a brace of random, late '50s Schwinn middleweights of varying condition, one Huffy, and a J.C. Higgins Flightliner. Nothing to write home about.

-Kurt
 
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pelletman

I live for the CABE
That bike is a Tribune, a pretty common make. Most you see are blue. It is what Charles "Mile a Minute" Murphy rode.
 

cudak888

Look Ma, No Hands!
That bike is a Tribune, a pretty common make. Most you see are blue. It is what Charles "Mile a Minute" Murphy rode.

Good to know. What details betray its origins? I notice that the Murphy bike (and a few other images I've dug up) have different dropouts and seatstay-to-seatlug arrangements.

-Kurt
 
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