What are your favorite vintage shop tools

Discussion in 'The Workshop' started by Barto, Dec 18, 2016.

  1. #1 Posted Dec 18, 2016

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    Every shop needs to start with the basics like a bench, lignts, a vice and bench grinder but part of the basics for me is some kind of compressor (even a small one). Stand-up compressors take up less room and modern units are more efficient. But my 1931 60 gal Manley built in Bridgeport Connecticut does ok. My 1934 Turner drill press is a bit of over kill for a simple oversized garage/shop like mine but was free from a neighbor and we put it to very good use.
    So, what's your favorite tool in your shop?
    Bart

    20161218_105348.jpg
     
  2. #2 Posted Dec 18, 2016

    I live for the CABE

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    The Air compressor. The motor is fairly new [1948] the tank is WW 1 or older. 3/8" riveted steel. 001.JPG
     
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  3. #3 Posted Feb 28, 2017

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    What, no one has any tools they like or want to share? Shocking!
     
    #3 Barto, Feb 28, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2017
  4. #4 Posted Feb 28, 2017

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

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    All I have are some hand tools by Ford Motor Co. from the 30s & 40s. :(
     
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  5. #5 Posted Feb 28, 2017

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    That's all? Ha, my neighbor has a bunch and has traveled all over the USA to find them....those original tools are gold! Can we see a photo? My friend would flip to see them (and he' s 80).

    Let's face it, these old tools are stil, being used for a reason....good quality tools made in the USA!!!!!
     
  6. #6 Posted Feb 28, 2017

    I live for the CABE

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    Back in the early 60's every time I seen an old balloon bike in the trash I dragged it home. I drove my dad nuts with all the old bikes I was always bringing home. Anything you would kill for now-a-days was on the curb for free back then and nobody wanted them [except me.....] Anyway while my older brother was customizing his 49 ford coupe I was mixing and matching bike parts to different frames making today what we call "rat rods".
    Taking off the head nut on a fork or changing a chain ring was always a big problem for me as I did not have a wrench big enough to fit something that big. I would always have to ride my bike about 3 blocks to my friend Bob's house to borrow his dad's big Crescent wrench. One day I was with my grandfather riding in his little Rambler American and I seen this old Monark in the trash and I ORDERED HIM TO STOP!! so I could put that big old bike into his tiny trunk,
    We got the bike in the Rambler 's trunk and old gramps gave me a lecture about how my dad would get mad for me bringing home another piece of &#!^ bike. I explained I wanted the spring fork for a project .......
    Anyway when we got back to gramp's house he produced this big ass old adjustable wrench like this one: il_570xN.751188380_auim.jpg
    and I took the springer off the Monark and put the bike in his trash. As a gift.... the best gift I got that year.... He gave me that wrench to keep.
    That was in 1962 and somewhere along the line that wrench disappeared ,but today all these years later those big wrenches are still my favorites...... Next flea market I go to I will hunt for one of those big old curved wrenches and buy it.

    004.JPG

    I know this was a long story, but I felt sorry for Barto........and anyone who ever talks to me at a bike swap knows, "I like to tell long stories."
     
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  7. #7 Posted Feb 28, 2017

    I live for the CABE

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    I too love old tools made in the U.S.A. I find them at estate sales and even some antique shops. Here's some hand tools I favor. 20161220_144651.jpg

    And a couple vises.
    20161220_144244.jpg

    20161220_144309.jpg

    EZ One pinstriper.
    IMG_20160427_201938.jpg
     
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  8. #8 Posted Feb 28, 2017

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

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    I managed to locate these. Most are scattered all over the house in drawers and boxes
    jjsbo6.jpg
    fdhmw9.jpg
    9jg1fc.jpg

    This old tire tube & clamp says it all!
    352nihk.jpg
     
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  9. #9 Posted Feb 28, 2017

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    That's what I'm talking about....these tools survived because they were made with quality in mind. Super nice tools, thanks for sharing....I gotta show my friend. Thanks man,
    Bart
     
    #9 Barto, Feb 28, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2017
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  10. #10 Posted Feb 28, 2017

    Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe

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    I refer to these old tools as "my reliable survivors!".
    Most of the modern ones made in... who-knows-where... have broken.
     
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  11. #11 Posted Mar 1, 2017

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    I know exactly what you mean...I'm 59 and still have and use my Dad's tools....I plan on passing them down as well. The hammers are pretty cool and the Wilton, I've always wanted one - I have some 5 large vices but the Wilton eludes me. Really cool tools! Thanks for sharing
     
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  12. #12 Posted Mar 1, 2017

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    HAHAHAHA, Yeah, I am pretty pathetic - had to beg to get some responses:) But look at the results, I got to see some really cool tools!
     
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  13. #13 Posted Mar 1, 2017

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    I keep coming back to this old compressor....looks really cool..what the heck is the tank made out of??
     
  14. #14 Posted Mar 1, 2017

    I live for the CABE

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    The tank is 3/8" + thick steel boiler plate rolled into the shape that forms the tank and riveted together This was assembled before the days of welding as a steam tank for a hot water boiler system sometime in the teens. The tank was made into a compressor sometime in the 50's. I am the second owner and have owned it 30 years with no problems.
    Solid as a rock and very heavy. I would like to see the machine that rolled that heavy flat plate steel into the tank shape.
     
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  15. #15 Posted Mar 3, 2017

    Wore out three sets of tires already!

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    My Compressor is dated 1931..I like yours better, looks so cool. Using giant rivets I wonder how they got the metal to seal back then....
     
  16. #16 Posted Aug 12, 2017

    'Lil Knee Scuffer

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    we have some old black smith made wrenches one that's got four heads on one end and another that's bent at a certain angle we know their black smith made from the way their made and the thickness of the metal and lack of markings but dont have pictures cause we still use these antique tools and usually their tossed in the tool bin with the modern wrenches..lol
     
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