What bike did you work on today?

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Nashman

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
I worked on my 1940 Dayton Zephyr on Sat./Sunday in hopes of getting the big tank lights and horn working. I had got the correct NOS thimble ( It looks correct to me) horn via mail and went right to work figuring this tank out. The light connections/battery tray were all there, so just testing/cleaning contacts and working the switch with contact cleaner and before long, I actually "saw the light". Sweet. Now the horn.

That was a bit more challenging. I'm not great with wiring. I do know that the tank is ground based on the battery tray tack welded at factory. The 4-D cells are the power source ( Neg is the tank) and positive ( terminal at tray front) for the switched light, and the button horn are completed when the switch is moved or horn button pushed.

I tested the horn button ( removed from tank) with a spare 2-D cell tank unit I had, as the button was in need of tweaking/contact cleaner. I wasn't sure where the + ( pos) to the horn went ( couldn't see anywhere/and it needed to be separate from the lights, so just soldered onto the +( pos) strip/front contacts battery above that surrounds the thimble horn/taped it up ( horn was grounded where mounted) and "voila" we have horn action. Like more "cow bell" but in this case, more horn. I got the NOS Goodyear G-3 Airwheels on it too.

The rear ( I'll call a Popes nose) light had a repro set up, so it worked with very little tweaking. Now I just have to get the Morrow hub working correct. It won't coast. ( Kinda like "that dog don't hunt") This bike will be display only, but I'm intent on having the option of riding and being totally functional, because it would bother me knowing it won't coast/brake. Does anyone know if the "innards" can easily be swapped from a donor hub? The current hub looks correct for the year, but ID numbers/letters have been plated over. Is the internal design pretty standard for late 1930's to mid 1940's? I seem to recall the teens and late 50's were different? Input/comments welcome.

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palepainter

Finally riding a big boys bike
I worked on my 1940 Dayton Zephyr on Sat./Sunday in hopes of getting the big tank lights and horn working. I had got the correct NOS thimble ( It looks correct to me) horn via mail and went right to work figuring this tank out. The light connections/battery tray were all there, so just testing/cleaning contacts and working the switch with contact cleaner and before long, I actually "saw the light". Sweet. Now the horn.

That was a bit more challenging. I'm not great with wiring. I do know that the tank is ground based on the battery tray tack welded at factory. The 4-D cells are the power source ( Neg is the tank) and positive ( terminal at tray front) for the switched light, and the button horn are completed when the switch is moved or horn button pushed.

I tested the horn button ( removed from tank) with a spare 2-D cell tank unit I had, as the button was in need of tweaking/contact cleaner. I wasn't sure where the + ( pos) to the horn went ( couldn't see anywhere/and it needed to be separate from the lights, so just soldered onto the +( pos) strip/front contacts battery above that surrounds the thimble horn/taped it up ( horn was grounded where mounted) and "voila" we have horn action. Like more "cow bell" but in this case, more horn. I got the NOS Goodyear G-3 Airwheels on it too.

The rear ( I'll call a Popes nose) light had a repro set up, so it worked with very little tweaking. Now I just have to get the Morrow hub working correct. It won't coast. ( Kinda like "that dog don't hunt") This bike will be display only, but I'm intent on having the option of riding and being totally functional, because it would bother me knowing it won't coast/brake. Does anyone know if the "innards" can easily be swapped from a donor hub? The current hub looks correct for the year, but ID numbers/letters have been plated over. Is the internal design pretty standard for late 1930's to mid 1940's? I seem to recall the teens and late 50's were different? Input/comments welcome.

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That is so awesome….
 

Ernbar

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Finally tore down the Perry hub in my 55 Spitfire, cleaned it and was repacked with fresh grease. I also switched the 46 tooth chainring for a 44 tooth one for easier pedaling. Took it for a quick test ride around the block.
The guts looked like this, very little grease visible. Sprayed brake cleaner to blast away the gunk and the parts looked like new when dry.

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The 44 tooth ring is about 1/2” or less smaller than the 46 tooth one. The chain did not have to be shortened either. Rides lots better now.

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