Wheel building class..How much would you pay?

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Sven

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Dec 24, 2017
3,471
56
Mechanicsville, MD, United States
There is a class offered by a not so near (an hour or mire away) bike shop. The instructor is a highly distinguished wheel builder. The course is one on one, and you can come back anytime afterwards to refresh your skills at no charge. The cost is $399 , if you buy the needed components at the shop..or $499 if you buy, elsewhere.. ln addition you need to purchase his two videos prior to class -$50

So its around $450 to $550.
Worth it or not?

.
 
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49autocycledeluxe

I live for the CABE
May 29, 2017
1,530
60
fremont california
no. if you only plan on building vintage wheels there is no need to take a class. our wheels are very forgiving. you tube is good enough. spend that money on a quality truing stand and a spoke tension gauge

if I were to wanting to build high end road bike wheels for money then it may be worth it
 

Shawn Michael

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Oct 3, 2012
746
Keizer, OR
That seems pretty steep to me. You may want to see if there is a community bicycle shop or co-op that offers classes first. I wouldn't pay that much to learn it.
Good luck!
 
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Sven

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Dec 24, 2017
3,471
56
Mechanicsville, MD, United States
I thought it was very pricey myself. I have the tools (a truing stand , dishing tool, spoke tension gauge, nipple driver......)I have the basics.
Lacing a wheel is no problem. Truing a rear free wheel hub is some what of a b#tch for me. I get it laterally and radially true, and the dish is off.
Dishing screws me up, I have to remember that I am moving the hub over not the rim. Fix the dish issue and it is out of whack laterally, correct that and the radial is out of true.
It's a whole lot of give and take and patience. I have to walk away . Then I think really hard about taking it to my LBS to deal with it..$40.
A class for$550 ..nope.
 

GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Sep 2, 2012
11,978
Central Arizona
This guy is pretty thorough and easy to understand. There are so many HOW TO youtube vids on anything that are totally worthless and finding a good one on your specific HOW TO can be frustrating.

 

Sven

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Dec 24, 2017
3,471
56
Mechanicsville, MD, United States
This guy is pretty thorough and easy to understand. There are so many HOW TO youtube vids on anything that are totally worthless and finding a good one on your specific HOW TO can be frustrating.

You are right about that video. He does a great job of explaining.
But when I need to adjust the dish, I'm like a deer in the headlights at times.
I need to draw a diagram of hub movement requirements.
 
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Shawn Michael

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Oct 3, 2012
746
Keizer, OR
Wheel building is an art I haven't learned yet, but would like to. I do think that some hands on training would be great. There are lots of talented people out there.
Shawn M.
 
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bikemonkey

I live for the CABE
Jun 25, 2016
1,361
67
North Carolina , Albemarle, NC, United States
I have been building wheels in bicycle shops since 1975. There are several key elements which make a big difference in overcoming potential building problems, especially in dishing.

Dishing rear wheels is a PITA but can be reduced to a minor irritation if approached in the right fashion. :sunglasses:

Assuming that you are dealing with a decent rim and the correct length of spokes, then the concept of centering the rear rim between the lock nuts (and not hub flanges) is the one thing to keep in mind throughout. Have I ever lost my concentration and moved the dish the wrong way...yes...it happens. Always put the wheel in the truing stand facing in same direction (I prefer the freewheel threads on the right when looking at it in the stand).

Here are some things you may find helpful.

The spoke threads, base of nipple heads, and rim spoke holes must all be properly lubricated before lacing.

Begin by tightening the nipples gradually and consistently by using the visible threads remaining as markers. When they disappear, count the number of nipple turns. Later, you may see the spoke end thought the end of the nipple slot and use that as a reference. The object is for all spokes nipples to be threaded the same distance - initially.

Detecting when the spokes begin to lose their initial slackness and start to move the rim is the point that makes all the difference in easier, accurate dishing, and removing/preventing rim "hop" (rim being out of round).

Spin the wheel and gun sight the rim in relation to the lock nuts and estimate where the rim will be properly dished. Using that reference, roughly true the wheel to that point using the least amount of tensioning as possible and then check the dish - the trueness does not need to be fine at this point as you are checking to see how close the dish is. It will be easy to make rim corrections at this point because of low spoke tension.

Once the wheel is close to being properly dished, then next adjust the hop without grossly affecting trueness. Then it is back and forth, keeping in mind that spokes on the right will be a lot tighter than the left side and the right side nipples will be harder to turn towards the end. As you are approaching optimum spoke tension, slightly over shooting the dish to the right (freewheel side) is a lot easier to correct than having it dished to far to the left.

Hope this helps!
 
Last edited:

Sven

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Dec 24, 2017
3,471
56
Mechanicsville, MD, United States
I have been building wheels in bicycle shops since 1975. There are several key elements which make a big difference in overcoming potential building problems, especially in dishing.

Dishing rear wheels is a PITA but can be reduced to a minor irritation if approached in the right fashion.

Assuming that you are dealing with a decent rim and the correct length of spokes, then the concept of centering the rear rim between the lock nuts (and not hub flanges) is the one thing to keep in mind throughout. Have I ever lost my concentration and moved the dish the wrong way...yes...it happens. Always put the wheel in the truing stand facing in same direction (I prefer the freewheel threads on the right when looking at it in the stand).

Here are some things you may find helpful.

The spoke threads, base of nipple heads, and rim spoke holes must all be properly lubricated before lacing.

Begin by tightening the nipples gradually and consistently by using the visible threads remaining as markers. When they disappear, count the number of nipple turns. Later, you may see the spoke end thought the end of the nipple slot and use that as a reference. The object is for all spokes nipples to be threaded the same distance - initially.
When the spokes begin to loose their initial slackness and start to move the rim must be detected - this is the point that makes all the difference in easier, accurate dishing and removing/prevent rim "hop" (out of round).

Spin the wheel and gun sight the rim in relation to the lock nuts and estimate where the rim will be properly dished. Using that reference, roughly true the wheel to that point using the least amount of tensioning as possible and then check the dish - the trueness does not need to be fine at this point as you are checking to see how close the dish is. It will be easy to make rim corrections at this point because of low spoke tension.

Once the wheel is close to being properly dished, then gradually adjust the hop without grossly affecting trueness. Then it is back and forth, keeping in mind that spokes on the right will be a lot tighter than the left side and the right side nipples will be harder to turn towards the end. As you are approaching optimum spoke tension, slightly over shooting the dish to the right (freewheel side) is a lot easier to correct than having it dished to far to the left.

Hope this helps!
Thanks a million...
I am using an old Schwinn Approved low flange hub, new spokes, nipples and rim (700c aluminum)
I got the rear wheel dished and mostly laterally trued . As I spin the wheel , there is a small area with a slight shift to the left ( non drive side) as well as a hop in the same location.
I hate hops...only in beer do I like hops.
Radially truing to me at times is like chasing a ghost.
 

vincev

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Nov 2, 2008
13,587
crown point<indiana
Call me lazy.Unless you want to do wheels for "fun" I would just get good wheels.lol....I have done wheels in the past and it can become frustrating if you dont know what your doing. Truing wheels is very easy.
 
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Sven

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Dec 24, 2017
3,471
56
Mechanicsville, MD, United States
I've done this Bikeman4U method with good results for non dish wheels. Starting at the valve hole tighten the first a half a turn, go to the third one after that and turn a half turn. Continue until all the spokes are tighten
 

Sven

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Dec 24, 2017
3,471
56
Mechanicsville, MD, United States
I like this video. The first 9 spokes, flip over the next nine. Rotate the hub , then over, over under and skip.


This man from Australia laces up his wheel completely one one side and then flips it over to do the other 18 spokes. Ive tried thus way, its okay. You are bending the heck out of the spokes, getting it through the previous pattern
 
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1817cent

Finally riding a big boys bike
Oct 18, 2016
455
Ellensburg Washington
I have built wheels over the years by using You Tube and the wheel building book. My most recent challenge was building a prewar high low hub on a Deluxe Schwinn where 2 spokes use the same hole. That was a challenge but a couple of people here on the Cabe told me how to do it and it worked. I would save your money and invest in a decent stand and tools AND use the resources on this site....
 
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