Boiled linseed oil?


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David Larson

Look Ma, No Hands!
Nov 16, 2017
97
192
23
North Dakota, United States
#21
If you know what you are doing the results IMO are worth the effort for a crusty original paint bike. There are truck loads of how to videos and information on the net from people that don't know what the f they are doing, to the experts and everyone in between. Nice job Mr. Larson
Thank You!

I actually filmed the entire process of disassembly, oxidation removal, detailing, and re-assembly. As soon as I get the rear rack and headlight lens in, I will finish the video and it will be on my YouTube channel. I will be doing this for a number of bikes in the coming months. I also included a short section about safely disassembling and cleaning that original prewar/wartime speedometer!

I'll be posting about these videos in the near future!
 

stezell

I live for the CABE
May 8, 2014
1,651
1,805
Clarksville, TN, United States
#22
My uncle Jim was a vintage body and fender guy from the 40's .Said the best way to paint a car and get the best finish was a combination of gasoline and lacquer paint ... Would leave a perfect shine ...Dangerous practice ...But seems like the gas from the past not only smelled good but didn't leave a bad taste like the gas of today...
Gasoline from the past also evaporated a lot quicker.
 
Likes: SKIDKINGSVBC

Muleman121

Finally riding a big boys bike
Nov 28, 2012
311
292
Murrieta, United States
#23
Thank You!

I actually filmed the entire process of disassembly, oxidation removal, detailing, and re-assembly. As soon as I get the rear rack and headlight lens in, I will finish the video and it will be on my YouTube channel. I will be doing this for a number of bikes in the coming months. I also included a short section about safely disassembling and cleaning that original prewar/wartime speedometer!

I'll be posting about these videos in the near future!
Very cool! Can’t wait! Have much to learn.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Shawn Michael

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Oct 3, 2012
589
625
Keizer, OR
#27
I have used boiled linseed oil on a couple of bikes with good results. The rags are very flammable and I just dispose if them by burning them outside.
 
Likes: TieDye

OhioJones

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Aug 1, 2015
988
1,096
Detroit, United States
#28
Wanting to try BTO err BLO on one bike. Also, use a wax or paste (?) on another. See which I prefer. Can anyone offer a suggestion for a brand or a particular automotive product as far as the waste pax paste wax is concerned?
 

GiovanniLiCalsi

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 29, 2012
3,669
1,975
Alameda, California
#29
I use linseed oil, cut 1-1 of lacquer thinner. It cleans and preserves. Try a small section, under the bottom bracket, for testing.....
 
Likes: stoney

TieDye

I live for the CABE
Aug 24, 2015
1,004
919
Henderson, MI, United States
#30
Looks too wet. Is too wet. Used rags are extremely flammable. Why not just use an automotive paste wax?
Automotive paste wax, even the best, does not prevent it from rerusting. I did a few bikes that way and I need to do them all over with the linseed oil. They are rusting on all the metal parts. Stuff I did with linseed oil still looks like the day I did them.
 

SKPC

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Feb 2, 2018
998
5,616
62
Utah - United States
#31
I use boiled Flaxseed oil all the time for most everything I want to seal from the elements. On old painted bikes, or exposed metals, it seems a perfect sealer. A natural product, non-toxic, and it has been an Oil-based paint additive for years. I have never had LS-wiped down rags catch fire...Hmmmm.
When I use it on old paint, I put it on thick and wet to ensure good seal-age, then with old clean rags and paper towels, wipe away all evidence of it.
Keep wiping it down as it dries for less glossy look. It'l dry in a few days via oxygen/air exposure.
 

Keith D

On Training Wheels
Aug 12, 2019
5
8
England
#33
I.m going to use the BLO sealing option for my bike as the weather here can make things rust in the workshop, even if I dont use the thing.

I have a few questions though, I see you have to re-apply the oil occasionally, do you have to strip off the old oil first or just apply over the top?
Secondly, I left some BLO out in a plastic cup and see that its gone fairly hard, If you do have to strip it off it looks to be a fairly hard process as the hardened oil didnt readily
mix with turpentine or most other thinners, Only cellulose thinners worked and that wasnt particularly quick. Any thoughts on this please?

Thanks for looking
 

GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Sep 2, 2012
10,545
9,314
Central Arizona
#34
I.m going to use the BLO sealing option for my bike as the weather here can make things rust in the workshop, even if I dont use the thing.

I have a few questions though, I see you have to re-apply the oil occasionally, do you have to strip off the old oil first or just apply over the top?
Secondly, I left some BLO out in a plastic cup and see that its gone fairly hard, If you do have to strip it off it looks to be a fairly hard process as the hardened oil didnt readily
mix with turpentine or most other thinners, Only cellulose thinners worked and that wasnt particularly quick. Any thoughts on this please?

Thanks for looking
If you use the linseed oil on exterior wood then yes you need to re-apply. On a bike frame I'd say no, you don't need to re-apply unless the bike was yard art being exposed for years outside. I had a 1 gallon can of this blow open from the Arizona heat and leak out all over the concrete floor. When I noticed it maybe years later there was a super hard pile of a resin type mess that I couldn't even chisel off the concrete. Once it's on it does not evaporate like an oil, it's more like a coating of resin so if the bike is stored out of the elements I would think it will last for a very long time.
 
Likes: Keith D

GiovanniLiCalsi

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 29, 2012
3,669
1,975
Alameda, California
#35
I like to blend melted bees wax, lacquer thinner and boiled linseed oil. You can use an inexpensive single unit conduction cooktop. Open flame is unsafe for flammables.
I used gallons of this on painted metal parts and wood, for many years, in my business.
 

NoControl

Look Ma, No Hands!
Oct 11, 2017
68
87
61
Bennington, NH, United States
#36
I like to blend melted bees wax, lacquer thinner and boiled linseed oil. You can use an inexpensive single unit conduction cooktop. Open flame is unsafe for flammables.
I used gallons of this on painted metal parts and wood, for many years, in my business.
How hot did you need to get the mixture, Giovanni? Just enough to melt the beeswax?
 

GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Sep 2, 2012
10,545
9,314
Central Arizona
#37
How hot did you need to get the mixture, Giovanni? Just enough to melt the beeswax?

I would like to know what the reason is to add bees wax to linseed oil for a paint/metal protectant. Maybe for waterproofing a canvas tent maybe?
 
Likes: piercer_99

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