Cap's Collectibles Kids cool finds


This ad disappears when logged in

glenhobbis

Look Ma, No Hands!
Sep 7, 2018
52
89
64
Port Moody, BC, Canada
#1
I'm selling my entire collection (located in Vancouver BC, Canada) of many categories of "wheeled" goods! Here is my first go at posting with many more to come! Future posting will include "An Austin J40 " pedal car, more misc pedal cars, pedal tractors, 1970 Peugeot 10 speeds NOS in the box, vintage tricycles NOS in the box etc, etc, etc!!!

Looking for good homes! Pricing in US dollars, will invoice through paypal, shipping is extra, happy to package with care and arrange shipping!

Vintage Antique Wicker Doll Carriage 1900's - $100.jpg


Vintage Baby Stroller with pull handle - $135.jpg


Vintage CCM 10%22 Trike Blue - $50.jpg


Vintage CCM 10%22 Trike Red - $50.jpg


vintage CCM joyrider tricycle - $85.jpg


Vintage CCM Wagon - $195.jpg


Vintage Childs Art Linkletter Gym Dandy Surrey Cart Bicycle - original untouched working condi...jpg


Vintage Childs Horse & Sulky Late 1940's metal - $310.jpg


Vintage Gendron Doll Buggy 1960's - $75.jpg


Vintage Sport Roadster Wagon - $375.jpg


vintage wooden seat tricycle.jpg


Vintage Wooden Seat,spoked wheel tricycle - $65.jpg
 

glenhobbis

Look Ma, No Hands!
Sep 7, 2018
52
89
64
Port Moody, BC, Canada
#2
oops pricing didn't show up, so here we go:
1. Vintage Wicker Doll Buggy = $100.00
2. Vintage Baby Stroller with Pull Handle = $135.00
3. Vintage CCM 10" Red Tricycle = $50.00
4. Vintage CCM 10" Blue Tricycle = $50.00
5. Vintage CCM Joyrider Tricycle = $85.00
6. Vintage Childs Art Linkletter Gym Dandy Surrey Cart Bicycle = $775.00
7. Vintage Childs Horse & Sulky Late 1940's metal = $310.00
8. Vintage Gendron 1960's Doll Buggy = $75.00
9. Vintage Sport Roadster Wooden Wagon = $375.00
10. Vintage Wooden Seat Tricyle = $65.00

All the above are in original untouched working condition (the horse & Sulky is missing a handle though)!
 
Likes: A.S.BOLTNUT

Nashman

I live for the CABE
Oct 2, 2016
1,638
2,460
62
Winnipeg, Canada
#5
Met your Dad ( or is he your late Grandpa?) Took the tour back in the old days. My Folks live in Van ( and Bro). Cool stuff. Tell me about the A40. I've had a couple. Cheers, Bob

j 40.JPG


j40 and pedal boat.JPG


rt side.JPG


rear.JPG
 

Nashman

I live for the CABE
Oct 2, 2016
1,638
2,460
62
Winnipeg, Canada
#7
Hi Bob, Cap was my dad. Your car sure looks nice! Mine sold a few months back. I still do have my Thunderbird Jr by Powercar! Glen
I'd love to see pics of the T-bird. I sold my J40 locally about 5 years back. I have too many toys as it is. ( or not enough, depends what day you talk to me?) Your Dad was a gem.

P1010017.JPG


P1010039.JPG
 

Jaxon

Finally riding a big boys bike
Nov 28, 2011
436
169
Sherburne, United States
#8
What kind of bike is the black and cream bike with the curved front forks? Are those forks custom or original? I want to make a pair of those forks.
 
Likes: Nashman

Nashman

I live for the CABE
Oct 2, 2016
1,638
2,460
62
Winnipeg, Canada
#9
What kind of bike is the black and cream bike with the curved front forks? Are those forks custom or original? I want to make a pair of those forks.
It's a 1938 CCM Flyte. Paint is custom, as are the handlebars ( Scott's nice repro Aiflow bars). Tires are oversize. I'll be putting correct chrome with red inserts/white pinstripes on it today, with correct 28 x 1 1/2 " tires. Frame is BONE stock/as are Gibson aluminum pedals, crank, chain ring, hubs etc. Toolbox saddle were common stock items. I'm in a long lineup to get one of those. The bike was restored by a CABE member well know for his Flyte knowledge and collection. I bought it from him, and put my own "spin" on it.

A LARGE history clip, I quote, ( See PDF for pictures)
"The CCM Flyte: The CCM Flyte, his lasting masterpiece, was a very unusual bicycle. Produced for just 5 years, from 1936-1940, before war clouds shut down most bicycle production in Canada, the Flyte remains a much sought-after collector machine to this day. It was also the only bicycle design that CCM ever patented

The Streamlined Decade: As well-described in Donald Bush’s classic book of the same name1 , the Streamlined Decade was an exuberant time in the 1930’s when top industrial designers, mostly in the USA, styled just about everything from locomotives to toasters as if they wanted to fly. These designers included Henry Dreyfuss (the New York Central’s amazing 2 1938 New York Central streamlined Hudson locomotive 1936 Kodak Bantam Special 1939 Sunbeam S9 toaster 1935 Elgin Robin, built by Westfield/Columbia Which brings us nicely to the streamlined bicycles - that sprang to life in the mid-thirties, from just about every North American manufacturer. Here are some examples from Elgin, Monark and Schwinn. Note that Elgin commissioned their streamlined bicycles, styled by Juan Morgan and sold through Sears, from either Westfield/Columbia in Massachusetts or Murray-Ohio in Cleveland. 1936 Elgin SkyLark 1938 Elgin Twin Tube 20 3 1933 Schwinn CyclePlane 1936 Monark Silver King FloCycle - with leaf spring! Canada Cycle & Motor: Canada Cycle and Motor or CCM (founded in 1899 from five Canadian competitors in The Junction, Toronto during the safety bicycle consolidation era)2 was a fairly conservative company by the 1930’s.

Their bicycles were well-engineered, solid and dependable, if somewhat uninspiring. They made skates in winter, bicycles in summer. But in Chicago, things were stirring in bicycle innovation and styling, in a bold attempt to shake off the last vestiges of the Great Depression. Home city to Sears Roebuck, Elgin, Monark and Schwinn, also not far from the other mid-west bicycle manufacturing hub of Cleveland; Chicago was, and remains, Toronto’s American rival city in many ways. There was nothing but a Great Lake or two to separate them. 1910 CCM Factory – The Junction, Toronto 1930’s CCM Factory – Weston, Toronto Things finally warmed up at CCM in 1935 when Harvey Webb Peace3 , the Chief Engineer (later Factory Manager) at CCM for several decades, decided to break away from the mould. CCM were by now located in a large, vertically integrated factory in Weston, Ontario (NW Toronto), having long outgrown the pre-WWI location at The Junction nearer town. 4 The CCM Flyte: The CCM Flyte, his lasting masterpiece, was a very unusual bicycle. Produced for just 5 years, from 1936-1940, before war clouds shut down most bicycle production in Canada, the Flyte remains a much sought-after collector machine to this day. It was also the only bicycle design that CCM ever patented4 . There were two evident objectives: a sleek, streamlined style (after all this was the middle of the Streamlined Decade) and a comfortable sprung ride without mechanical suspension.

Roads were still pot-holed and uneven in the Dirty Thirties. The Monark Silver King Flo-Cycle bears a superficial resemblance to the Flyte with its rear elliptical frame, but the Monark was constructed of stiff thick-walled aluminum tubing and had to use a leaf spring between the bottom bracket and rear frame to provide resilience. The leaf spring on the 1936 Monark FloCycle Over 2” wide balloon tire debuting on 1933 Schwinns The Schwinn CyclePlane of 1933 achieved resilience by using wide and low pressure balloon tires on giant rims, the invention of which was forced on the US rubber industry by an exasperated Frank Schwinn. In the decades before, American bicycles had mostly used the unreliable one-piece tire with no inner tube. To achieve resilience with the Flyte, Harvey Peace came up with an innovative solution, a combination of an unusual reversed fork geometry and a rear loop frame, all made from seamless aviation-grade thin steel tubing. Both the front fork and the frame provided a reasonable feather-bed ride over harsh surfaces, without the drag of balloon tires or the movement of springs. 5 Designed in the spring and summer of 1935, by early Fall prototypes had been built and tested. Here is a September 1935 photograph of a working prototype at the factory, and an isometric drawing made at the same time of the design concept, but with racing bars.

Canadian Industrial Design #10893, 26 September 1935 US Design Patent #99302, filed October, 1935 Figure 1 from the CCM Flyte patent CA358849, of June 1936, showing the unique frame and front fork 6 Impact at the time At the time, the CCM Flyte was considered the height of Canadian style. In the first year it was in mass production; Canadian National Railways, famous then for such innovations as the first diesel-electric train to cross the North American Continent, in 67 hours5 (in 1925 long before diesel locos were in use) and the first wireless service on TransContinental passenger trains (1923), saw the appeal of the Flyte design and adopted it for their telegram messengers. Here is a great 1937 picture from CCM’s dealer magazine of a pair of CNR messengers posing proudly with their Flytes, in Dominion Square, Montreal - not far from the CNR pre-war System Headquarters on McGill College Avenue. CNR Telegram messengers in Montreal’s Dominion Square, 1937, with modified CCM Flytes The heavy-duty braced handlebars for the CNR messenger version were borrowed from CCM’s Motorbike range, pace Schwinn. CCM was easily the biggest bicycle manufacturer in Canada at the time, and had an excellent reputation for quality. What made the Flyte special, especially at a time when American (as opposed to Canadian) bicycle styling and design was in overdrive, after decades of slumber? It was firstly an engineering job rather than just styling.

There is a humorous story in Peddling Bicycles to America6 of Westfield rushing their prototype Elgin Bluebird streamlined bicycle to Sears HQ in 1935, for viewing by the President. Behind the drapes, Juan Morgan’s stylists did some final finessing. When unveiled, the Bluebird’s headlight ended up a sticky mass of modeling clay in the over-curious President’s hands. The Flyte close-up: The Flyte was a streamliner in a leaner more engineered tradition. It included an advanced cotterless crank (developed inhouse by CCM and used on other top models) the Triplex Hanger. This had a triangular projection on the bottom bracket axle to grip the 7 CCM’s advanced Triplex Hanger crank Triplex Hanger axle and cranks The pedals, also designed and patented by Harvey Peace in the 1920’s, were of an innovative aluminum monocoque design, named - after the General Manager of CCM - as Gibson pedals7 . This prevented the twist experienced with built-up pedals of that era. Monocoque aluminum armature – the Gibson pedal From the Gibson patent, showing interlocked rubber blocks Balloon tires and fat rims were eschewed in favour of quality Dunlop Fort tires of modest size (28” x 13 /8”) for the time and roads.

Alas, the elegant drop handlebars and graceful fluted fenders shown in the 1936 patent did not make it to production. The most prominent difference (from all bicycles before or since) was the reversed and sharply contoured front fork, intended to give a better cushioned ride on the rough and tumble urban pavements of the streetcar-dominated 1930’s. The rake angle was actually conventional, despite the startling appearance. In a radical design move, the fork came horizontally out of the headset (instead of the normal vertical) and acted as a C-shaped trailing link spring. Chrome-moly hi-tensile aircraft steel tubing was used, again ahead of current practice in the industry at the time. Then there was the frame itself, with an elegant rear loop design that included a built-in rear axle adjuster. The rear stays followed the curve started by the crossbar, then curved around to the rear axle forming an elliptical rear spring suspension. Two years later, Elgin in Chicago were to go even further with this concept, with their innovative twin loop frame with no seat tube, allowing the whole frame to work like an elliptical spring. Juan Morgan took out a design patent for that8 .

Was he inspired by Harvey Peace’s Flyte 8 design? Cushioning from road shocks was the objective in both cases, without adding mechanisms or links. Transverse rigidity was thus maintained for good handling. Increased tire life was even claimed from the sprung frame benefit, in the Flyte patent4 . Present day riders of restored Flytes confirm the smooth ride sensation18. The Elgin twin loop sprung frame, 1938 The Elgin twin loop with 2 speed Musselman hub Tube Tales: Two main companies made the critical seamless steel tubing for the burgeoning bicycle industry out of Great Britain, both started at the end of the 19th century and both based in Birmingham. The one still famous today is Reynolds, the one forgotten today is Accles & Pollock. A&P were the innovators in the 1930’s, adapting their aircraft ChroMoly alloy tubing for lighter yet stronger bicycle frames. Unlike the Reynolds Manganese alloy, A&P’s ‘Kromo’ increased in strength at brazed joints, rather than weakening. 1927 ad from Flight magazine, A&P tubing 1931 ad for the new A&P ChroMoly bicycle tubing 9 When Kromo was introduced in 1931, CCM were one of the first North American manufacturers to use it, on their Flyer racing machine17. So it was no surprise that they again adopted this alloy for the streamlined Flyte in 1936, saving pounds on the frame and forks, yet giving superior strength and fatigue characteristics. It would be another 60 years before Reynolds would develop a ChroMoly alloy for bicycles16 (the same 525 alloy used on one of the authors’ Moulton TSR2 bicycle), displacing their older 531 alloy Manganese tubing.

Sadly, A&P have now disappeared as a tubing manufacturer. Coaster Brakes: Braking on the Flyte was by CCM’s sturdy Hercules design of coaster brake on the rear wheel. No front brakes were fitted, a common practice in North America, particularly during the Streamlined Decade. As a vertically integrated factory, CCM were quite proud of their own design of coaster brake - at a time when most other manufacturers in North America were using the classic New Departure Model D coaster brake (70% of the market) with its internal disc pack. Hercules cross-section from 1937 patent CCM Hercules coaster brake hub The Hercules hub had originally been invented during WWI, but had recently been improved under Harvey Peace’s direction. There were several 1930’s CCM patents for the Hercules coaster brake9 , which claimed simplicity and dependable braking: at a time when English bicycles were using the not-so-dependable side caliper or rod rim brake on chromium plated steel rims (uncertain braking in the wet). North America had better allweather bicycle brakes10 than Europe in the 1930’s. Extras: From the start the Flyte was priced well above the conventional CCM bicycle product range.

In 1937 they were even fitted with chromium-plated forks. The Flyte remained a single speed coaster bicycle (with a high 78” gear) throughout its 5 year production run. American bicycle manufacturers were largely pre-occupied with the new two speed domestic hubs at the time, for example on the 1938 Elgin Twin Loop with its Musselman geared hub and hand shift lever). 12 Sturmey Archer, to whom CCM as part of the British Empire tariff zone would later turn to for 3 speed hub gears, had unfortunately dropped coaster 3 speed hubs with the 1936 10 introduction of the AW hub. Not until 1952 would they bring back the coaster geared version as the TriCoaster TCW. 1936 CCM Catalogue for the new Flyte model Attractive drop handlebars added to Flyte by owner Innovative running gear was everywhere on the Flyte, from ‘aerodynamic’ Troxel leather saddles with integral streamlined tool compartment to aluminum/bonded rubber lightweight Gibson pedals to the “Triplex Hanger” cotterless cranks. Flyte as in Flight indeed. Much of this was in-house CCM designed. Wheels were the larger 28” variety, a common choice at the time. The Flyte weighed just over 30 lbs, half the weight of the typical Streamliner of the time18. CCM’s racing origins: As early as 1917, CCM had introduced the CCM Flyer, a racing bike for the track or road, with drop handlebars, triple hanger cranks and laminated wooden rims. The frame was light yet sturdy enough to be used on a Roadster version.

By the 1930’s, CCM had a major commitment to racing with champion riders like Willie Spencer and Torchy Peden13 , winning races on both sides of the border. They sponsored a CycleDrome on Dundas Street, Toronto, modeled on the Newark, New Jersey track with 6 laps to the mile14. Later Six Day indoor races became very popular with the public. The Afro-American ‘Major’ Taylor was another famous rider associated with CCM, contributing a special Major Taylor version of the drop handlebar stem on the Flyer. 11 The CCM Flyer track and road racer, 1917 on Post 1938 Flyte with conventional Truss fork The Flyte designer, Harvey Peace, was also a champion cycle racer in his youth, his son Douglas was on the Canadian Track Cycling Team at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin. This racing background did two things. It enabled CCM to leverage the racing success in their ads for regular bicycles. In addition, it informed the choice of Streamliner when the Flyte was designed, without the excess weight found in much of the ‘Streamlined’ competition. The Triplex Hanger saved weight in the crank, at a time when virtually every other manufacturer was using the Ashtabula one-piece design – sturdy but heavy.

The Flyte’s narrow (by 1930’s standards) 28” x 1 3 /8” tires on Endrick rims also helped. Ironically, postwar, CCM dropped the Triplex Hanger and patented15 their own version of the ubiquitous Ashtabula crank for their regular production bicycles. Epilogue: In retrospect, it seems CCM did not know quite what to do with their new prodigy. Little marketing was done after Harvey Pearce’s untimely death (he only lived to see the first year of Flyte production); and the pricing and perhaps those radical front forks may have put some buyers off. The country was still recovering from the Great Depression which had hit the Prairies hard with droughts for a decade, along with a collapsed stock market. There appear to have been failures of the streamlined fork design after a few years of use. Clayton Foxall of BackPeddling18 recalls entering a shuttered old CCM shop from the 70’s and seeing as many as half a dozen broken or bent Flyte forks hanging in the rafters. The failures often occurred at the location of maximum bending stress, where the curved fork horizontally attached to the top lug casting. Harvey Peace would no doubt have been able to redesign the fork for greater fatigue strength here, but he was long gone. Instead, in 1938, CCM introduced a modified version, with a conventional truss fork of the time, later called the Flyte Eight. They continued to sell the streamlined fork original version as well, with only a 5% price difference between the two premium models. Clearly this was not an attempt to lower the price to significantly increase sales. 12 It is in the ensuing decades since Harvey Peace’s premature death on 12 December, 1936 in High Park, Toronto, that the brilliance of the Flyte design has come to be appreciated - by both bicyclists and collectors alike, surviving the hubris of the Streamlined Decade. Requiescat in Pace. Harvey Webb Peace, 1880"
 

Attachments

Last edited:

This ad disappears when logged in
Most Recent BUY IT NOW Items Listed on eBay
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture