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Freewheel rubbing on rear derailleur nut

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GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
I hope yours isn't the model J. Hard to find RT for that one.



1669608443083.png
 

GTs58

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
It is the model J. I was able to remove it from the hub using the Park Tool FR-4 tool.
I thought the J had a handful more splines and a bigger ID. My collecting ends were the Sprint models ended.
 

WillWork4Parts

Wore out three sets of tires already!
I thought the J had a handful more splines and a bigger ID. My collecting ends were the Sprint models ended.
Both of the freewheels pictured in this thread are the smaller spline and use the same removal tool. The freewheel cluster that started being used in roughly 73 has a noticably larger ID.

I'd say in this case, it was likely just the freewheel replaced....so, I'd shim both sides of the hub to make it ride until a Sprint freewheel cluster is found. Then remove the shims so you don't have to worry about dishing the rim multiple times.
 

juvela

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
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One possible source of the rubbing which has not as yet been mentioned would be a gear block spacer.

This is a plain washer fitted between the hub shell and the gear block in order to fine tune the chainline.

The common thickness is 1.5mm, however 1.0mm and 2.0mm were also used.

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The Schwinn Approved gear blocks which came in ca. 1973-74 with the large splined opening for a remover are Normandy brand as manufactured in France by the firm of Maillard.


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notroman

On Training Wheels
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One possible source of the rubbing which has not as yet been mentioned would be a gear block spacer.

This is a plain washer fitted between the hub shell and the gear block in order to fine tune the chainline.

The common thickness is 1.5mm, however 1.0mm and 2.0mm were also used.

---

The Schwinn Approved gear blocks which came in ca. 1973-74 with the large splined opening for a remover are Normandy brand as manufactured in France by the firm of Maillard.


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Good to know for future, thanks. I had this hub completely apart. No extra spacers in this one, just the items posted in the hub parts diagram above.

I may just add axle spacers on both sides as WillWork4Parts suggested and avoid dishing the wheel again. This will push me 1mm over the current dropout spacing which means getting the wheel on will be a bit of a pain, but I think that's less headache than dishing the wheel multiple times. The wheel isn't going to come off that frequently.
 
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