Odd Campagnolo "quill" seat post

Most Recent BUY IT NOW Items Listed on eBay
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
I have an odd seat post that was either originally designed as a quill style mount, or was a stock post modified for use bike by frames requiring that style. I can't find any Campagnolo markings on it, but its design is similar or the same as Campy posts made in the mid 80s through the 90s. I have a couple examples of similar Campagnolo posts (standard clamp mount); one from circa 1985, another circa mid to late 90s. They both display characteristics of the mystery post. A photo of what appears to be the same post has it shown with a Campy Nuovo Reggisella Super Record box and has a directions brochure from the presumed manufacturer/modifier/distributor which shows the "Moser" logo and states it as a "Reggisella Super Record- Campagnolo, modificato per telaio LEADER" (modified for LEADER frame). I am curious if it was sold in a Campy box even though the post is unmarked itself.
So if my post is the same as the "Moser" one, was it "modified" by Campagnolo, or sent out for another shop to modify/distribute/retail for Moser (and probably others) during their production of the "Leader" frames needing that post design. I could not discern any markings on the "Moser" post other than "LIMIT" and related hashmarks. Why no Campy identification on either post? Possibly a liability issue regarding the modification that Campy didn't want to deal with, thus not providing a brand name connection. Although my post is professionally modified, the cinch bolt does not meet what I would expect from Campagnolo (unlike the chromed rail clamp bolt). The actual post is of Campy level workmanship. The cinch bolt is a standard steel metric bolt with the threads machined off of the first cm or so. The connecting rod is aluminum, as is the "wedge" (just the base of the barrel cut off); the plug is non-magnetic metal ("pot" metal?). There is wear of both holes where the bolt penetrates the post barrel causing elongation of the holes, and below the bolt head there is a very tiny crack from the bolt being pulled down. It will need to have steel inserts to reinforce these areas for future use or the damage will progress to a point of being unusable.
I am using this post on an '87/'88 Leader SC to replace a SunTour stock quill design and finally finish a 4 year project. The SunTour design is better, but has limitations for heavier riders which does not affect me; but I wanted all Italian parts on the bike.



1652030


1652031


Lower post is circa '85, middle post is the quill style, upper post is circa '96-'98
1652032


1652033


"Look-alike" post to mine (my post has no limit marks and no polished shoulder bevel at top of barrel) Photo credit OLDBICI.com
1652034
 
Last edited:

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
The rail clamp bolt spacer does not conform to the curve of the clamp head. Not sure why this is; it appears original with having the same patina as the rest of the post in that area. It could be a replacement from a different post due to loss of the original part, or possibly the incorrect piece was used during original assembly. Who knows; just another question without an answer!
 

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
Another Campy seat post question: Does anyone know what bike frames required 27.4 mm diameter posts? I have a Campy post (stamped 27.4; circa '68-'72) and I do not (as yet) have a frame it will fit into unless I ream the seat tube. Was this a standard size post for a certain frame design? What size post did an early Colnago Mexico use when they were made with the 0.5mm walled straight gauge Columbus Record tubing?
I can't imagine any other early 70s thin walled tubing that would be suitable for that size post. I don't know if Campy listed their post sizes in the catalogs, but I will check to see if 27.4 shows up anywhere.

Edit: Campy listed a 27.4mm post in their #14 (circa '60), #15 (circa '67), #16 (circa '69), and #17 (circa '75) catalogs. That only makes me realize that there must have been a sufficiemt amount of Italian/European frames requiring that size to keep it listed for well over a decade, but who used them.
 
Last edited:

juvela

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
-----

have always thought of the 27.4mm as a repair size

somewhat in the same vein as the 36.5mm bottom bracket cup size

do not recall it being offered by other manufacturers


-----
 
Last edited:

ccdc.1

Look Ma, No Hands!
Not an era I have much knowledge about, but I think the 27.4mm size was particular to early 90's Paramount OS tubing.
 

juvela

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
-----

as Jesper writes above the size goes back to at least 1960 in Campag catalogues...



-----
 

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
I was surprised to see the 27.4 size listed so far back in a catalog. It would make sense for it to be used as a "repaiir" part if seat lug/tube was reamed or honed. I was still surprised to see 27.2mm listed in the #14 catalog (apparently first cat. with posts). I assume Reynolds butted 531, Columbus, and/or others were making tubes apt for 27.2mm posts unless they were also first used primarily as repair parts in the 50s-60s.
Did the early high-end butted Columbus (before the "SL" designation was used) and Reynolds butted 531 seat tubes always use 27.2mm posts?
 
Last edited:

ccdc.1

Look Ma, No Hands!
My response above was a bit confused [I read The Cabe forums for Lightweights and Schwinn Lightweights, and in this case was thinking I was responding in the Schwinn forum...which this is not...thus, the response that the only Paramount I know of that was designed for a 27.4 is the Paramount OS]. My mistake.

Back on topic now, the 27.4 size is actually much older than 1960...it corresponds to earlier seat pin sizing based on 1/64" increments. The British #5 seatpost is 1 5/64" in diameter, which corresponds to 27.39mm. The attached image is from a Reynolds alloy seat pin chart chart from the 1940s. As shown, #5 would fit Reynolds 24 gauge seat tubes. Size #4 is 1 1/16" or 26.99mm, for Reynolds 22 gauge seat tubes. It might well be that the 27.2mm seat post size became popular as an easier fit in lightweight frames, as any deformation from brazing the seat cluster would make it necessary to ream the assembly to reliably fit the #5 seat post in a 24 gauge tube.

Reynolds posts copy.jpg
 
Last edited:

Jesper

Finally riding a big boys bike
My response above was a bit confused [I read The Cabe forums for Lightweights and Schwinn Lightweights, and in this case was thinking I was responding in the Schwinn forum...which this is not...thus, the response that the only Paramount I know of that was designed for a 27.4 is the Paramount OS]. My mistake.

Back on topic now, the 27.4 size is actually much older than 1960...it corresponds to earlier seat pin sizing based on 1/64" increments. The British #5 seatpost is 1 5/64" in diameter, which corresponds to 27.39mm. The attached image is from a Reynolds alloy seat pin chart chart from the 1940s. As shown, #5 would fit Reynolds 24 gauge seat tubes. Size #4 is 1 1/16" or 26.99mm, for Reynolds 22 gauge seat tubes. It might well be that the 27.2mm seat post size became popular as an easier fit in lightweight frames, as any deformation from brazing the seat cluster would make it necessary to ream the assembly to reliably fit the #5 seat post in a 24 gauge tube.
Thanks for that wonderful information; clears up everything!
I have one in use on my Moser - they're pretty much required on this marque.
What year and model is your Moser? Mine has no lugs ("SC": senza congiunzioni; fillet brazed). Does that post have any Campy markings?
 
Top