i.d. help Crescent Sweden??


This ad disappears when logged in

Mr. Monkeyarms

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Oct 30, 2018
788
2,629
Colorado
#4
I can't help with information, sorry. I can help your ego, perhaps by saying this bike is AWESOME!! So many cool details. Fender trim, decals, paint, rear reflector, etc. And that chainguard!! :hearteyes:(I have a thing for cool chainguards). Great patina!Very cool bike I would be proud to ride! Enjoy!
 

New Mexico Brant

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jul 6, 2016
2,039
6,410
49
Santa Fe, New Mexico
www.BrantMackley.com
#5
Sorry to say it is not early 1900's, more like 1960's is my guess but you should defer to others who have expertise with these. It is amazing to see a serial number in the 3+ million numbers. According to the link below, these were high end bicycle in Sweden at that time. Looks like it would clean up and be a great rider!

http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Sweden/crescent.htm
 

kshimp41

Finally riding a big boys bike
Jun 10, 2015
166
158
Williamsport, United States
#6
Sorry to say it is not early 1900's, more like 1960's is my guess but you should defer to others who have expertise with these. It is amazing to see a serial number in the 3+ million numbers. According to the link below, these were high end bicycle in Sweden at that time. Looks like it would clean up and be a great rider!

http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Sweden/crescent.htm
Thanks. I was thinking earlier, but I am guessing.
 

GiovanniLiCalsi

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 29, 2012
3,669
1,975
Alameda, California
#9
Crescent Bicycles in Sweden
Cykelhistoriska Freningen

- From USA to Sweden -
The American company Western Wheel Works in Chicago was a big manufacturer with a production yearly of 50.000 bicycles in 1894. Adolph Schoeninger, the founder came from Germany. He had the idea of making "Crescent" bicycles affordable for working people and of widening the market by massive exports. He used sheet-metal stamping and other production methods aimed at lowering costs. In many ways he was preceding Henry Ford and mass production. Due to that the export from the United States generally lowered prices in Europe. And the bicycle boom was a fact. In Sweden few manufacturers was at hand in the middle of 1890ies. As the demand was great – the interest for the new method of transportation was rising enormously - a stockholder company was formed called Aktiebolaget Amerikansk Cycle Import, Eli Pettersson & August Lindblad in 1896. August & Eli decided to import and sell, among other brands, the Crescent and Miami bicycles, and also had agencies of several bicycle accessories. They were no beginners in the business, although both were young men. August (born 1864) was importing among other bicycles the American brand Eclipse and some English brands. His hardware store in Stockholm was selling bicycles as a side-line. Eli (born 1868) was a renowned racing man and managed a small bicycle store selling the Humber from England and also repaired bikes.
In 1896 August and Eli imported 6.000 Crescent bicycles. Stockholm was a rather small city at the time with 200000 inhabitants. In only a half year all bikes were sold, either to the countryside or in their own shop. With the purchase of a bike followed a free lesson in a bicycle school (Östbergs Velocipedskola). The following year they had 38 employees, and got the agency for Dunlop in Scandinavia.
Crescent Amerikansk Cycleimport also sold the American Snell in black or green, and the German bicycle Allright with Dunlop tires and yellow mudguards made of wood
Around the years 1907-1908 AB Amerikansk Cycleimport started to produce bicycles with the name Crescent in their own factory. How they could use the earlier so well-known American name is unclear. As a comparison the name from Gormully Jeffery, Rambler was registered by Albert Öhman around this time and used on Swedish made bicycles for a long time.The factory was actually more like a large forge, 10 men working with tools and machines of old-fashioned types. The frames were made during the autumn & winter and were assembled in the spring & summer. An ordinary working day was between 8 am and 8 pm, except during high season (April-October) when they worked until midnight. Between 1500 to 2 000 bicycles were made each year. As fashion influences from abroad.dictated the bikes had a long basic frame with a height of 24(60cm) inch but also 22(55cm) or 26(65cm) inch were possible. For the exceptionally long gentlemen they could make a 28(70cm) inch frame on special order. In the primitive storage were supplies for American Crescent and Rambler, English B.S.A., German Dürkopp, and Austrian Styria.The request for more and more bikes and frames made it necessary to move the manufacturing to larger space. In the autumn of 1910 the company moved to Tunnelgatan 10 and the business changed the name to Velocipedaktiebolaget Lindblad. For unknown reasons the partners Eli Pettersson and August Lindblad went separate ways. Eli Pettersson moved and started business at Birger Jarlsgatan 9 in 1914. He was selling the New-Hudson motorcycle.
The company Lindblads Velocipedfabrik had a number of users among the competitive men in Sweden. The long and demanding road races were most popular as velodromes were scarce. One rider using Crescent during the Olympics on the July 7 1912 in Stockholm was Henrik Morén. He was expected to be the best Swedish rider since he had won the distance 10 times. Against the toughest competition the Swedish team won the gold medal. The individual gold went to the completely unknown Rudolph Lewis from South Africa who won his biggest victory. The race had individual start and Lewis was second out from the start. Henrik Morén and many others suffered in the morning heat and he was only the fifth Swede far away from the medals. Still Sweden and Morén had hopes for the next Olympic Game.The first world war changed many things and the Olympic games were no exception. Even though Sweden didn't participate in the war it had its effect - tires and other bicycle parts were extremely hard to get.
After the war Lindblads had a good time where new machines were bought and branch departments was opened in Malmoe and Gothenburg. Lindblads sold, together withtheir own makes Crescent and Drott, the Torpedo hubs from the German company Fichtel & Sachs and motorcycles from Harley-Davidson. The Danish racer Henry Hansen went to Sweden 1924 and for a long time during the 1920's he was competing more in Sweden than in Denmark.He managed to take the Olympic gold in Amsterdam 1928 on a Crescent and became the world champion in Copenhagen 1931. With those victories the bicycle brand Crescent showed its capacity. Even though the brand Crescent was successful in competition and the times were good, a deal of cooperation between Lindblads in Stockholm and Nymans in Uppsala was discussed. In the autumn 1931 the manufacturing went to AB Nymans Verkstäder in Uppsala, with Lindblads as a sales organization. This deal came about mainly because the factory in Stockholm had old machinery and no possibility of expanding. Already the same year the production of Crescent and Drott moved to Nymans Verkstäder and also the agency for the Torpedo hub. Gustaf Grahn who had been an employee of Lindblads since 1910 and had shown his skill, got a head position in Nymans Velocipedfabrik. Later he become the president and worked for the company until Monark purchased Nymans in 1960.
Written by Åke Stenqvist
 

kshimp41

Finally riding a big boys bike
Jun 10, 2015
166
158
Williamsport, United States
#11
Thanks. Confused Torpedo hub could barely read
51. 1951?? Looks like behind badge is a faded triangular area . Another badge? Is bike mixture of
mid century and prewar? Help
 

andybee75

Finally riding a big boys bike
Jul 25, 2011
110
162
Markaryd, Sweden
#12
OK, so here´s the fact: The bike is from 1951, the year stamp on the hub aligns as it should with the serial number. It´s a ongoing number, so there´s no model code or anything like that in the number. The maker, Nymans Verkstäder in Uppsala, bought the company August Lindblad in 1931 and continued to make the swedish Crescent in Uppsala. It was previously made in Stockholm. Nymans Verkstäder made a lot of similar bikes with different names, some brand owned by their own company, some for others. The bikes were of very good quality and finish and are nice to ride. The paint behind the head badge is correct, the bike in general are original except for the head lamp. Here´s my unrestored and almost unused Crescent from 1952, the same bike: http://veterancykel.se/Crescent-1952-herr/
 

Jeff54

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Sep 11, 2013
2,171
942
Ft Myers, Florida
#13
Indeed it is nearly the exact same bike that andybee75 has, and what a cool bike it is too. The saddle is exact construction except yours has a cooler texture. rear rack is a little different and as shown the appearance of a ghost badge on paint is accurate in that it's not but just original painted area. Perhaps not as highly valued for the age and not USA made nor are the 50's US racers or lightweights but certainly nice construction, design and decoration (Paint scheme). It's the 1st I've seen of this but thought too, even before I noticed the 1st clue; the forward facing drop outs would be no older than late 1930-early 40's, not an early bike .

Regardless, comparatively in consideration to a US early 50's verses yours, It's a Keeper!
 
Last edited:

andybee75

Finally riding a big boys bike
Jul 25, 2011
110
162
Markaryd, Sweden
#14
The rack was changed 1951/52 and the toolbox inserted below in slots of the rack was changed from a paper material to plastic. The cleverly constructed lock also locked the toolbox simultaneously when locking the wheel. The saddle might not be original, but at least it's contemporary, they used leather cladded saddles before 1952 and as far as i know the saddles were brown plastic cladded in the same smooth structure my bike has.
 
Last edited:

This ad disappears when logged in
Most Recent BUY IT NOW Items Listed on eBay
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture
eBay Auction Picture