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Toc Lenox with large tubed frame

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cr250mark

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Acquired this Lenox awhile back as the large tubed frame caught me eye.
Cool tall frame (24” frame 1-1/8” tubing) -
What was the purpose of the larger tubing , seems to be a pretty light overall .
Was this primarily availability ,durability, trades marking or performance choice ?
This is the second Toc I’ve had with the larger tube but definetly different manufacturer
And frame style .
Also has Unique adjustable bars I posted separately here on the Cabe to try to acquire a little information
Slightly different from from the Claus I’ve had before on another Toc and also slightly different than the few others That were posted as similar designs , any thoughts ?
I’m assuming Pope manufactured based on fork ,rear stays / drop out design and most literature I have seen . Any thoughts welcomed .

Early owner added custom leather toe guards or debri flaps to original traps.


Seen a few other posts with Lenox badged bicycles but not a lot so figured I’d post
To get a little info and share for further use.

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Last edited:

Ricker

Finally riding a big boys bike
Larger diameter tubing is stiffer and therefore could have a thinner wall thickness- In other words if two frames have equal weight, and one is large diameter tubing and the other is small diameter tubing, the large diameter will be stiffer and perform better

That is a great bike! Thanks for sharing
Rick
 

cr250mark

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Larger diameter tubing is stiffer and therefore could have a thinner wall thickness- In other words if two frames have equal weight, and one is large diameter tubing and the other is small diameter tubing, the large diameter will be stiffer and perform better

That is a great bike! Thanks for sharing
Rick

Thanks for info makes sense , so simply 1-1/8 tubing possibly also used as early Sales technique to differentiate its Bicycle for “Performance” over others since assuming less 1-1/8” framed bicycles were being manufactured in comparison to typical 1” extc. frame diam.
 
Last edited:

cr250mark

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
I see quite a few of these early Toc bicycles with these dropped bars , sleek saddles and brakeless rear hubs like this Lenox and always think Racer !
What categorizes a true racer from a standard Toc roadster so to say.
Assumed a lot was chaining , bar design , wheel size possibly and frame profile .
I’m sure it was challenging to stop these guys
 

locomotion

Cruisin' on my 1897 Comet
I see quite a few of these early Toc bicycles with these dropped bars , sleek saddles and brakeless rear hubs like this Lenox and always think Racer !
What categorizes a true racer from a standard Toc roadster so to say.
Assumed a lot was chaining , bar design , wheel size possibly and frame profile .
I’m sure it was challenging to stop these guys
that is a good question, and I wondered the same
from researching one of my bike, a '95 Lovell, I found in the catalogue that the only difference between the racer, the semi-racer and the light roadster was the bars and the seat, the rest was basically the same
 
Last edited:

cr250mark

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
that is a good question, and I wondered the same
from researching one of my bike, a '95 Lovell, I found in the catalogue that the only difference between the racer, the semi-racer and the light roadster was the bars and the seat, the rest was basically the same

Thank you , i see as bicycles transitioned into the early to mid 1900’s it was a little easier to distinguish a racer .
So back in 1800’s sounds like the only real advantage
Was the Rider ! Size , weight and pedaling endurance because that seat and bars wasnt adding a ton of advantage
Now a days , whoosh ...,.,. So many variables weight , airflow gearing extc.
Cool stuff ! I Appreciate your feedback
Its feeling like Quebec City here In Illinois Cooooold hopefully not this bad in Canada lol

Thank you
Mark
 
Last edited:

dnc1

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
I see quite a few of these early Toc bicycles with these dropped bars , sleek saddles and brakeless rear hubs like this Lenox and always think Racer !
What categorizes a true racer from a standard Toc roadster so to say.
Assumed a lot was chaining , bar design , wheel size possibly and frame profile .
I’m sure it was challenging to stop these guys
Tubing size, tyre clearance to stay bridges and fork crowns.
Even then this was a consideration I believe on true race models.
Then, as now, at the end of the day ultimately it was down to training, rider strength, nous, and (unfortunately) the ever present doping.
 

locomotion

Cruisin' on my 1897 Comet
Thank you , i see as bicycles transitioned into the early to mid 1900’s it was a little easier to distinguish a racer .
So back in 1800’s sounds like the only real advantage
Was the Rider ! Size , weight and pedaling endurance because that seat and bars wasnt adding a ton of advantage
Now a days , whoosh ...,.,. So many variables weight , airflow gearing extc.
Cool stuff ! I Appreciate your feedback
Its feeling like Quebec City here In Illinois Cooooold hopefully not this bad in Canada lol

Thank you
Mark
your bike is very nice, and it's cool that the catalog is available on Ebay
got to love it when sellers post good clear pictures directly in the for sale ad ..... you won't have to spend the $165 ;)
looks like your bike was set-up as a light roadster (only a guess by the tires used, seat and bar drop)
the bar drop on the Racer in the 1895 Lovell catalog is very low

We have some pretty good weather here in Quebec this winter, doesn't get too cold (our worst was -28) and not too much snow ..... prefect winter to play outside
 
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